In the old days

In the old days people would periodically lubricate the gears on their tools and appliances to keep them in good working order. In our so called modernity people have become too lazy and stupid to go around lubricating; so manufacturers have replaced hardened metal gears with plastic ones so that people dont have to lubricate them. In fact in most modern tools and appliances, the way they are designed, you can barely access the gears let alone lubricate them. The downside is that plastic breaks a lot easier than hardened steel. Welcome to the throw away garbage life style. Heres a thought: How many bottles and cans etc. do you have to recycle to make-up for all the damage that a throw-away appliance or tools is responsible for?
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 14:44:48 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

and appliances to keep them in good working order. In our so called modernity people have become too lazy and stupid to go around lubricating; so manufacturers have replaced hardened metal gears with plastic ones so that people dont have to lubricate them. In fact in most modern tools and appliances, the way they are designed, you can barely access the gears let alone lubricate them. The downside is that plastic breaks a lot easier than hardened steel. Welcome to the throw away garbage life style. Heres a thought: How many bottles and cans etc. do you have to recycle to make-up for all the damage that a throw-away appliance or tools is responsible for? Perhaps but most here know how to "lubricate the gears" of their newsreaders.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The other side of the argument is that a better model of the tool becomes available before the one with the plastic gears wears out. I could be wrong, but I'm thinking of portable devices like drills, saws, and the like.
Then, too, my garage door openers contain nylon gears slathered with some kind of grease (chicken fat?). True, they give up the ghost but it's not a big deal to replace them - and not expensive.
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themselves rather than the other side, which is usually far more expensive and/or harder to replace. IOW, they're designed to break.
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On Sunday, June 24, 2012 6:24:23 PM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

I always thought that's what a clutch was for.
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 19:14:15 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

1) nope 2) There usually isn't one
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In the old days people would periodically lubricate the gears on their tools and appliances to keep them in good working order. In our so called modernity people have become too lazy and stupid to go around lubricating; so manufacturers have replaced hardened metal gears with plastic ones so that people dont have to lubricate them. In fact in most modern tools and appliances, the way they are designed, you can barely access the gears let alone lubricate them. The downside is that plastic breaks a lot easier than hardened steel. Welcome to the throw away garbage life style. Heres a thought: How many bottles and cans etc. do you have to recycle to make-up for all the damage that a throw-away appliance or tools is responsible for?
There's also a plan called "Obsoletion" which manufacturers have in place to limit the life of their products for several reasons, but the main reason is to provide jobs.
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On Sunday, June 24, 2012 4:46:39 PM UTC-7, Meanie wrote:

Jobs in China.
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 17:18:44 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I find that the people who bitch the most about jobs going to China buy less US content than those who don't. What do you drive? What appliances? Tools?
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On Sunday, June 24, 2012 6:26:06 PM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

GMC, SPEED QUEEN, HILTI
No, I don't know if the parts for them are made in China but at least it's better than buying a Rockwell 3RILL.
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 19:18:30 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Government Motors. Figures.
You have a speed queen refrigerator? A Hilti Drill.

Not the point. I wouldn't buy one, either.
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manufacturers may have many plans, but creating jobs is never their top priority...that belongs to the search for profits and the two are almost mutually exclusive
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On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 14:44:48 -0700, recyclebinned wrote:

Some of us still do that kind of thing...

I've seen white silicone grease used a lot in things with plastic gears. I suspect that plastic gears are used simply because they're easier to fabricate (and yes, as someone mentioned, because sometimes they're designed to be a weak point in a mechanism).

Thankfully there are usually older products available on the used market which will do the same job.

Here's another thought: How are those bottles and cans recycled? Where are they shipped for handling, and how much energy is used in the processing?
cheers
Jules
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