In-floor radiant heat. Repl. floor. Long!

Hello-
My house, in Northern Virginia, was built in the late 1940s. It is heated, on both levels, by in-floor radiant heat. It's a pretty early version of the technology, and original to the house. It consists of a network of 1" steel pipes embedded in concrete (or perhaps mortar-- I'm not sure), fed by a gas fired boiler.
Originally, it had oak parquet flooring glued down (each tile being made up of five small strips). Early on in the life of the house, the floor more or less disintegrated. The individual strips came apart, and the tiles themselves separated from the floor.
Subsequently, a second floor-- this time oak parquet single piece tiles-- was glued down *on top of the old floor*. So, we now have a forty year old, fairly unattractive, crunches-when-you-walk-on-it floor. I could have it refinished, which would make it a moderately better looking, crunches-when-you-walk-on-it floor.
Aside from the aesthetics (and for that matter, the acoustics), my major concern is the efficiency of it all. In order for the main level to achieve a comfortable temperature, the boiler really has to crank it up. The bathrooms and kitchen floors, which are tile over the subfloor (no layers of wood) become quite warm. Hot, even. Now, the cat loves it. And I appreciate it when coming out of the shower, but otherwise it makes for more cold spots elsewhere than we would like.
I'd like to strip off both layers of wood floor and replace them with a single layer of...something. But what? Of course, tile, slate, terra cotta, terrazzo, etc. would work beautifully; but would be a pretty bold fashion statement for a post-war "colonial." Not to mention pretty pricey for anything worthy of LR, DR, Den, etc..
Is anyone aware of a wood product that can be laid down like tile (i.e. in a mortar bed)? What about a floating floor? Would the heat transfer be better than the current situation? Would an engineered product hold up to the heat?
Incidentally, the second level is carpeted over the slab. The heat in this zone is much more uniform. I just do not want to carpet the main level.
And finally, if you are wondering: yes, the house is built like a bomb shelter in order to support all of the weight. The construction is block and brick, with almost all first level interior walls being load bearing (and block), and any large open areas are spanned by steel I-beams.
It's difficult to find contractors locally who have any experience with this system, so finding any sort of solution has been problematic. Your thoughts and suggestions would be very much appreciated!
-Chris
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Wood is apx 1-2 R per inch ,a laminate product or new thinner prefinished wood may be better but you need to find our the products R value, insulating value before you buy. Main level vs second floor , you have valves you can adjust and should for each room.
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