Improving house heating

I'm trying to get more heat and cooling to the second floor in our house.
We have a few sections of flexible, metalized (but not metal) ribbed tubing in the basement that connect the furnace to the ducts going upstairs. This is probably slowing down a lot of the airflow. I'm guessing they used it where they had to go up and around beams and tight corners.
Should I: - leave it - replace it with same sized galvanized ducting (5" I think) It would be a slightly longer distance because of the limitations of the pieces. - find a flexible ducting material that's smooth on the inside to reduce friction
Thanks in Advance
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Brooklin wrote:

You need to start by doing or have done a Manual D calculation. This will help you figure out what is really wrong without guessing. Normally this would be done by a contractor.
While I suspect you are on the right track, you may find that you do a lot of work only to end up with minimal improvement.
I have two problems with my current system, and I have just lived with it as it is not too bad. Come time for a new system, I will find someone who will do all the right planning and improve my system at that time. I will also look into a zoned system.
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Joseph Meehan

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Good advice from Joseph, load calculation is first step. I'm a huge fan of variable speed furnaces. They reduce your electricity consumption and if matched to your home with proper calcuations will push air longer which may help in reaching the second floor. You can buy them in both 80% effecient models and deluxe 90+% models which will save on gas consumption too.
There comes a time in the affairs of man when he must take the bull by the tail and face the situation. -- WCF http://www.utahhousevalues.com
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As the others have said, you really need a Manual D calculation, with calculations for each run of duct. However. . .
My sense is that your ribbed duct isn't likely to be the major source of the problem. While it will slow the airflow some, at least it won't leak unless punctured. Metal rectangular duct, if not properly sealed, which it wasn't until recently, will leak like crazy, especially at every turn.
There are a ton of other factors that come into play, such as the location of the thermostat - on the first floor, I'm guessing, which would explain the lack of cooling in the summer on the second floor.
I'd start with a consultation with a quality HVAC contractor who can suggest various ways to fix the problems that are bothering you.
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Doug Boulter

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