If you had roofing work done:

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mm wrote:

Hi, Of course, whole house shakes.
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wrote:

The floor generally outlasts the house built over it.
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On Fri, 11 Jun 2010 23:17:52 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Oh. Well, what if you have to dig it up to bury someone? Be sure to check the furnace for parts dislodged by the jack hammer vibration. Crime Detective, June 1988, page 114.
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Hehe-- My friends are always asking who I have buried in the basement. For 20 years I've been lowering the floor in the basement of my 100yr old house. Last summer I removed the furnace & lowered that section. I guess I'm lucky the furnace was outside [in pieces] when I was running the Stomper down there.
Now the only part of the basement that has a new, permanent floor is the 6x10 slab that the new furnace sits on.
I do use a Bosch demo-hammer to break up the clay- so next time I'm digging down there I'll keep an eye on the new furnace. [the old 'floor', an inch of rotten concrete comes up easy]
Jim
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around here the roofer is supposed to inspect the chimney cap when doing a complete re roof.
the roof was replaced in july, the carbon monoxide poisioning in december
so it definetely was a problem when the roof was replaced.
and since my ladder doesnt reach to the chimney height and i dont like heights to begin with its the roofers job and a pretty easy one at that.........
I have replaced chimney caps on other homes since then.
Inspect cap if its cracked remove broken masonary, clean area so new cement sticks.
Mix new cement and place neatly and finish so its smooth. Mostly the hassle is the inconvenient location.......
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Molly Brown wrote:

Huh? Our furnace is in the basement. I have a metal roof which will last more than 50 years.
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Did you check to see rotted wood was replaced, flashing inserted on the chimney not just caulked on, proper grade of nails used. Ive been cheated all the time, you should have gotten a permit and the free inspection, then paid.
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Molly Brown wrote:

3. If your dryer vent exited through the roof, does it still do so after the roofers leave? 4. While we're at it, does the gas water heater vent still vent through the roof? 5. Not connected to the possible fire issue, but do the sewer vents still vent through the roof?
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On Fri, 11 Jun 2010 15:32:12 -0700 (PDT), Molly Brown

Would be kinda difficult with the furnace in the basement - - - - - .
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Umm... If the roofer is only doing work on the outside surface of your roof, then anything that happens inside the attic other than the appearance of a water leak in the new roof isn't the roofer's problem... Making sure your attic is clean inside would only be within the roofer's scope of work if they had to replace the roof decking and had to strip your roof down to the rafters... Otherwise, cleaning up INSIDE your house is your responsibility unless you arrange for your contractor to take care of that extra work for you at an additional expense because you are either unable or unwilling to do it yourself...
Saying that a contractor is required to OR SHOULD be checking up on your house on things way outside the scope of their work is crazy... It shows that you really don't know enough about home repairs to do more than ask silly questions on a newsgroup...
~~ Evan
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On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 12:28:11 -0700 (PDT), Evan

All this is true on a solid roof deck - like plywood or (gasp) OSB - but what about on a roof where the board decking has 1 inch (or more) gaps, like on many of the roofs I've stripped in years and decades past????
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On Jun 12, 8:50pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

If the roofer did not cut a hole into the roof or go up in the attic to access some aspect of the job, cleaning the attic is not within the scope of the roofing work...
Someone who is that anal to want whatever small debris that would fall into the attic from a roofing job to be cleaned up by the contractor doing the roofing work has other issues they need to address which have nothing to do with home repair...
BTW, I have only seen some roofs with the gaps in the sheeting which used solid roofing materials like wooden shakes or slate tiles, as asphalt shingles require a solid deck to be used on a roof...
~~ Evan
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On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 20:13:41 -0700 (PDT), Evan

I've removed a fair amount of Cedar over the years, as well as the old interlocking asphalt shingles that were installed on open board sheathing. Then there's the "old" tin shingle, as well as standing seam and corrugated metal. Generally requires laying plywood over the boards for modern 3-tab or architectural shingles.
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My furnace is in the basement. I don't have recessed lighting.

What are covers on a furnace? You mean the vents? They're screwed in place.
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wrote:

I've seen shingles used with 1x roof decking. It was quite common up to perhaps fifty years ago. Those houses haven't gone anywhere.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

They are talking about skip sheathing, which was common before asphalt roofs, so as to keep the bottom of the wood shingles dry.
--
aem sends...

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No, and no.
However, I don't think that smearing some tar and press on some fiberglass of a trailer will knock the access panels off my furnace. Nor drop dust on my lights.
--
Christopher A. Young
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