If torsion spring breaks on metal garage door

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Hypothetically, on a metal garage door, if the torsion spring breaks, can you disengage the garage door from the garage door opener (track) and open and close it?
Suppose there are 2 torsion springs and only one spring breaks, same question?
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Doug wrote:

Hi, When it happened to me, I temporarily joined broken spring together with small U bolt and rewound it to just open the door once to bring cars outside. Then I closed the door down, called the service guy.
After watching him do it, now I can work on door problems myself.
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On Mon, 26 Nov 2012 08:55:47 -0700, Tony Hwang wrote:

I've seen the youtube videos and web pages where they actually weld the spring together temporarily and they also use a u-shaped spring clamp.
Seems to me the u-shaped spring clamp is the easiest for a homeowner to get the car out of the garage.
The only thing is that I winced when I saw the video of the guy winding the temporarily repaired spring.
I kept thinking to myself "what if that spring clamp broke?"
So, its' probably slightly more dangerous to wind a temporarily fixed spring - but it will work for sure.
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Danny D. wrote:

Hi, Using U bolt is only one time deal to get the cars out of garage. I have pair of winding bars I made of steel rod in 2 feet length. I wear work gloves, safety goggles when I work on springs. Have done it only couple times over the years. Springs last long time.
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On Mon, 26 Nov 2012 18:39:24 -0700, Tony Hwang wrote:

I understand.
There are at least THREE temporary repair options, two of which were not initially obvious to me: 1. Use a grooved spring coupler to connect the two pieces 2. Clamp the two pieces together with a spring clamp 3. Use the shortened spring with the GDO disconnected
Here's a video where a supplier of the grooved spring couplers (DMATools.com) shows how the moon-shaped spring coupler is used to repair a broken torsion spring: http://www.veengle.com/s/spring%20coupler.html
Here's a supplier of the cable clamps who also provides a detailed DIY for how to temporarily repair broken torsion springs: http://www.prodoorsupply.com/category-s/192.htm
Here's a video where they used a 'spring clamp' to temporarily fix 3 3/8" and 6" torsion springs.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sHu3JtoUhV0

Personally, if I had to temporarily repair a garage door torsion spring, I would probably disconnect the garage door opener and remove the winding cone from the broken end and insert it onto the long end.
Then I would manually open the garage door, with the shorter spring counterbalancing 'most' of the weight, but not all.
Since torsion springs are so inexpensive (less than fifty bucks in most cases), I wouldn't bother with either the grooved spring coupler or the U-shaped spring clamp unless I happened to have them in the garage already.
The beauty of those two methods is that the spring retains its strength - but the beauty of the shorter spring method is that you don't need anything to temporarily fix the torsion spring.
Of course, winding either a repaired torsion spring, or winding a shorter (but old) torsion spring has its dangers - so - when mine broke a couple of weeks ago, I simply hefted the door open, and then left the garage door down until the new spring arrived by UPS.
Installing the new torsion spring takes less time than it took me to watch all the youtube videos! :)
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What if you have both Springs broke. How do I open my door?
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On 4/4/2016 10:22 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Get some extra muscle!
If all else fails, you can isolate each individual panel (beginning with the topmost) and raise each separately. I.e., the opposite of when the door is assembled/installed.
Do *not* play with the torsion springs! You are likely to lose a finger (or three).
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Don Y wrote:

Bullshit . With reasonable caution and the PROPER tools most handy men can replace tham . One caveat - tension both sprinngs at the same time , alternating between them to avoid problems caused by the tension rod being twisted by spring torque .
--
Snag



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wrote:

Agreed. I did mine when I installed this door but you do have to be careful and have the right rods to crank them up (typically 1/2" cold rolled steel). You can make up a nice set out of a 30-36" stick of steel rod, cut in half. As you say, it is handy to have 2 sets, so you can bring the springs up evenly. Do one turn on one, then go do a turn on the other. Once I got a few turns on each I raised the door enough to put an old bathroom scale under it and used that as a guide to how close I was. It did take a little fine tuning to find the sweet spot, where up force on the closed door was about as much as residual force against trying to close the open door.
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On 4/4/2016 1:13 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

With reasonable caution and the PROPER tools most handy men can fix their own computers, rebuild their own automobile engines, blow their own glassware, rewire a home, dig out their own crawlspace, fell their own trees, etc.
Yet, amazingly, few people do these things -- and few do so without also injuring themselves (or damaging some collateral property)
You get slightly *less* than ONE mistake when tensioning a torsion spring. Belatedly discover that you need to take a breather or that one of the "sockets" for the tightening bars is a bit buggered and you can't "press pause".
far less risk in changing your own motor oil -- yet amazing how few folks will go to that "extreme"!
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Don Y wrote:

Doing it myself instead of paying someone with probably less knowledge and damn sure cares less about my ass has enabled us to live a lifestyle otherwise out of our reach . I figure if I can do it I should . About the only thing I won't tackle is automatic transmissions . Today a neighbor and I laid the Advantech flooring on our new 24 x 24 foot kitchen ... by the end of the week I expect to be standing up some walls , next will be building the 6/12-3/12 scissor trusses , then on to decking the roof . And on and on , until ...
--
Snag



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On 4/4/2016 5:59 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

Isn't that the motivation behind *most* DIY'ers? My car hasn't seen a shop in more than 10 years. SWMBO's last vehicle only saw a shop when the timing belt had to be replaced.
One of the five 40+ ft trees on the property was felled commercially (because a large bough passed *through* a neighbor's tree meaning that tree, at the very least, would likely see damage if I tried to fell it from below). None of the stumps for the four felled trees were ground -- I dug them each out!
No one has ever touched any of my PC's in the 35 years I've been running them. No one has fixed a piece of electronic kit that I owned *ever*.
The roof here has ~25 years on it. The neighbors' have all been replaced in that time period.
We don't "buy on time", carry balances or pay late fees. We can live without cellphones (though SWMBO has an "emergency phone" for those times when she is out and runs into difficulties). We don't need to "pay for TV" -- or other "entertainment services" (library can supply us with more media than we've time to watch).
Etc.
BUT, we *can* do these things. I'd be very reluctant of recommending to
capabilities) that they even APPROACH the "both springs broke", let alone try to dick with them!

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Ditto here.

Agreed.

I've done two. And I'd do a third one before I'd replace a torsion spring on a garage door. I'm not as young as I used to be, and the healing process takes a lot longer than it used to. It's just more risk than I want, and the amount of money I'd save by doing it myself does not IMO justify the risk.
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On Mon, 04 Apr 2016 13:52:42 -0700, Don Y

I was working in my garage one day when I heard some yelling I couldn't make out. It continued, so I investigated. A neighbor two doors down had tried adjusting his torsion spring and dropped the door. His index finger got squashed between the top 2 panels and was still stuck there. I lifted the door with a wrecking bar and freed him, then took him to the hospital - he was a nurse there. The broken finger had to have the meat stitched back on. OTOH, I've adjusted them using screwdrivers to crank them. Of course, that's with the damn door closed.
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On 4/4/2016 7:11 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

I tend to operate on the premise that I can always get more *money* (or, can choose to live without something for some period of time to "make up for" money spent) -- but can't always get another hand, foot, eye, etc. This is particularly true for things that can go "very wrong" in an instant!
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On 4/4/2016 10:11 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

That fellow is quite fortunate to have you for a caring neighbor. I'm not sure he said thank you, but I am, and will: Thank you.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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On Mon, 4 Apr 2016 23:36:41 -0400, Stormin Mormon

I think he did say thanks, but it's something any normal person would do. But I didn't like that he insisted he be taken to the hospital where he worked, which was at least a half hour farther than a number of local hospitals. Understandable, I suppose, for insurance reasons. Nor did I enjoy waiting at least 3 hours while he was treated. It was a terrible day for him, just a bad day for me.
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Robert Heinlein:
A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, bu ild a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooper ate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, progr am a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Special ization is for insects.
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On 4/5/2016 1:14 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

That's my general experience with such things. The folks who need help often put a lot of conditions. And it's seldom fun or convenient for the helper.
Still, it shows and speaks well of you as a person.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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On 4/5/2016 10:14 AM, Vic Smith wrote:

Three hours seems blazingly fast! I've had two ER visits in the past 20+ years, was "#1" coming out of triage -- yet spent 5 hours there, in each case.

We've stopped acting as ambulance for folks. They can call 911 (or, I can call FOR them). The ambulance is parked less than 2 miles up the road and there are at least two hospitals within 3 miles of here.
OTOH, if I put someone in my (or their) vehicle, then I assume liability, have to address traffic, lights/etc. ("officer, we're on our way to the hospital -- which is why I ran the light -- and would have been there by now had you not stopped us"), can not monitor the "patient" to see if their condition is deteriorating, can not render aid (and still operate the vehicle) if the "patient" takes a turn for the worse, etc.
The EMT's can be here in 5 or 6 minutes. My time is better served observing the patient and taking direction from the 911 operator (who is, undoubtedly, relaying my observations to the ambulance crew).
Some things really aren't worth "saving pennies". A friend was found dead in her car on the side of the road cuz she opted to drive herself to the hospital. A lot of good those savings did *her*, eh?
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