Identifying a Faucet

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Can anyone tell me the manufacturer of this faucet? It needs some work, and I cannot get it apart. (The left handle will not come off of the valve.)
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and I

Not sure of the maker, but if you can get the right side apart, a good hardware store might be able to match it for you.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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Those are phillips screws in the tops of the valves? Hard to tell form your picture. The screw won't come out? Or the handle won't come off after you get the screw out?
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On 6/7/2010 9:09 AM, jamesgangnc wrote:

The handle on the left will not come off after I get the screw out. The handle on the right removes with no problem. I tried loosening it with WD-40 and even tapping with a hammer, but it didn't help. I have some other stuff to try when I go back over there. At this point, I'm getting really close to replacing the whole unit, which is what's going to happen if I break it anyway.
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there are handle pulling tools once the phillips screw is out. or carefully destroy the handle and put on a new pair
often replacing the entire faucet is easier :(
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Go buy a new unit. Then pull on the handle until it either comes off or something breaks. If it doesn't break then you can just return the new one while you are buyng washers or whatever the old one needs.
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If you opt to replace consider the American Standard brand with the ceramic disc valves.
Not too pricey and in the 15 years I have had these in my home not a single drip and they work as smooth today as they did when I installed them. The only thing I don't like about then is the drain plug that doesn't seem to effect a very good seal so soaking something takes a bucket.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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My suggestion is to go to Lowe's and buy a new ffaucet and then install it. Once it's installed and working. the old handle will come off very easily. It's amazing how that works...
Rob
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Take the screw out and pour a bunch of vinegar down the "hole". Let it sit while you rent/borrow/steal (or if you have to, buy) one of these:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
You can get them at ACE, Home Depot, Sears, etc.
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Agree with DerbyDad -- you need the proper tool to take apart the faucet as it is obviously gunked/corroded together...
The tool he linked you to will help you deal with your issue...
~~ Evan
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I was thinking the right tool would be more than I would be willing to spend. But this one is not bad.
It might also be possible to use a piece of wood as a rest and a couple larger screwdrivers as pry bars.
The vinigar is a good idea too. If it's stuck it's probably calcium. Some diluted muriatic acid might work as well but you would have to be careful to keep it off the finish unless it is sealed.
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On 6/8/2010 8:23 AM, jamesgangnc wrote:

I have a similar tool that I used to use to pull bearings from motor capstans, but the center pin is too large. My local Lowes store appears to have this one in stock, so I'm going to buy one for the toolbox, even if I decide to replace the entire faucet.
It's possible that the valve has trash in it. If all I have to do is clean it, I'd rather not replace the faucet.
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If you have a puller that you think will grab the sides of the handle then you can put something small on top of the shaft to deal with the center pin being too large. Like a small nut. You could also try leaving the screw in but loosened but there is a risk that pushing against it will deform the threads.
Not that it's a bad thing to get a new tool :-)
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On 6/8/2010 11:30 AM, jamesgangnc wrote:

Leaving the screw in but loosening it may work. If I do that, though, I will deprive myself of a new tool. There could be a time in the future when loosening the screw will not work and I'll need the tool. Plus, with inevitable inflation, the tool could cost a lot more next year, so I need to get it this year. (Ignore that I have not needed one in the last fifty years.)
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I can't argue with an excuse to buy a tool since I'm always looking for those, yukyuk. Every project should include at least one new tool.
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nope tool prices may fall with the new factory opening on the island of datlya. the islanders are thrilled to make 3 cents a day.
perfect to export into the US
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What is the nature of the problem which requires "work" on the faucet ?
~~ Evan
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On 6/8/2010 8:24 PM, Evan wrote:

The flow is restricted, and the problem is not the aerator.
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Restricted flow in the hot side might be chunks of dip tube from the water heater.
A while back some water heater manufacturers used a plastic that would degrade over time causing this very mischief.
You might also check the angle stop on the hot side if you find crud in the valve.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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Usually you find some of those bits in the aerators. I know I did.
Before forcing the handle off I'd get a bucket, diconnect the lines at the bottom of the faucet and make sure both flowed well and equally into the bucket.
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