Ideas to remove middle decking boards?

I'm in the process of replacing 1/2 my decking boards with new 5/4 x 6 boards. It works out to half the width of the deck measured side to side. Where the old and the new meet I'll be intermingling the old and new boards with a 32" intersection (kind of like putting ones fingers together). The old decking used concealed fasteners (which I hated). My question is: any ideas how I can cut the old decking board midway across a joist without destroying the adjacent two?
A sabre saw needs space below the board; a circular saw won't cut to the edge; an ocillating tool doesnt really make a straight line; etc.
Any ideas suggestions appreciated.
tired old man!!!
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On 7/5/2014 2:40 PM, BobMCT wrote:

Use the circular saw to get as far as can; then cut thru and remove the bad side to the some access. Then clean up w/ whatever you've got...with care it can be down w/ a Sawzall, a multi-tool, while slow will certainly clean up a cut, or even if there aren't too many, a good sharp chisel will do wonders.
With care a pattern bit and router could be used as well...
--



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In typed:

If you have access from underneath ---, maybe you could use a sabre saw and just cut the old decking boards off even with the edge of the joists below rather than trying to cut them off in the center of the joist below. Cut those boards off from above, then put a sister joist along that same joist from underneath and use the sister joist as the nailer board for the new boards that you are adding. That would be easier than worrying about having both boards land on the center of one existing joist.
Even if you don't have access from underneath, you may be able to figure out a way to nail sister pieces along the existing joist by dropping them through the half of the deck that you are replacing, pulling them up in place from above, and nailing them through the spaces where the "finger spaces" are located.
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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 20:10:30 -0400, Chuck Finley

Wow, thanks Chuck. I have a router w/bit and never thought of that. Also, the deck is at ground level so unfortunately no way to get under it. But I like the router idea.
ps: to bad Burn Notice got canceled!!!
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wrote:

Rotozip type cutter. Slow but effective.
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I'm not sure why you say an oscillating tool doesn't make straight line. I've cut many a straight line with one using various blades: plunge, straight, and half moon. The main key is to mark a line so that you have a guide to follow.
If you choose to go the router route, just be sure to compensate for the width of the bit. You want your guide to be positioned so that the edge of the bit cuts along your line, not the center of the bit.
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wrote:

I suspect you'll need something other than a router as the length of the cutting edge on bits smaller than 1/4 is too short to cut through the boards. That's true of all the bits I have seen at least.
Maybe one of those zip tools like drywall guys use to cut out inside electrical boxes?
--

dadiOH
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On 07/06/2014 08:33 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Yah, amateur stores like McLowesDepot prolly doesn't carry long bits but MSC does.
http://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/58535824
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On Sun, 06 Jul 2014 09:19:30 -0400, Chuck Finley

Well gents, I did have a 1/4" straight router bit and tried it. Set the plunge to limit to the thickness of the old board. Sort of worked OK. But out of frustration I tried my oscillating tool with a straight wood blade. Cut almost like butter and I did NOT have any issues with straightness. I simply followed the lines I had measured and marked. Finally, as the old decking was held in with concealed clips nailed into the sides of each board, I used my circ saw to rip up the center of each board to come out all the way until it met the perpendicular cut. I could then literally lift each side out from the middle and discard. Whoa! quite easy and worked great.
Thanks for the suggestions.
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On 7/5/2014 3:40 PM, BobMCT wrote:

Drill hole. Use jig saw raised on a shim if the blade is longer than the board is thick. Looks good on paper ;o)
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