Ideas to remove 50-year old 2-inch diamater galvanized "nipple" under kitchen sink

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On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 23:30:48 -0600, Vic Smith wrote:

For this idea, cutting a wide berth around the pipe DOES give us some useful access.
It would give us the width of the cabinet (about 3/4 inch) extra room to slide the hose and hose clamp on.
I've never heard of this type of "pipe hose" so I'll google as that is one idea to add to the list of how to fix this leak.
At the moment, it's holding with LOTS of pipe dope (#4 stuff) but I don't expect that to last long so I will have to do something.
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Harold Lathom wrote:

Don't know.
This is an example of a T Bolt clamp. They clamp pretty tight. It might be easier to use for your problem. > http://tinyurl.com/4cu9qr4
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On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 21:54:40 -0500, clare wrote:

In effect, what I've done, so far, is just that.
Only I used plumbers pipe dope in a can, number 4 IIRC. I just gooped it on until the leak stopped. But, of course, that's only a temporary fix.
I guess I could just epoxy the whole thing up, and maybe silicone it too. In fact, I think that's my "last resort" as it should work.
It wouldn't be something to be proud of ... but ... it should work. Thanks for the idea.
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Are you absolutely sure that pipe is 2” and not 1 ½ “? You do know that pipe diameters are measure from the inside and not the outside right?
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On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 20:09:30 -0800, Molly Brown wrote:

Well, I 'was' sure, until you asked. :)
And, I am measuring from the outside to the outside (I had no idea HOW they measure the stuff as all I want is a part that fits).
I'm not at that location right now so I can't double check; but I did a rough measurement with my hands and then went to Home Depot and bought 2 inch replacement parts.
What is the 'normal' diameter of 1960's era kitchen sink drain pipe?
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You will need this tool:
http://www.perfectoproducts.net/index.php?page=right-angle-pipe-wrench
I would recommend making a sleeve for the “plug” using a short piece of 1 ½” copper pipe to bring it up to 1 Ύ” when you insert it in to your 2” galvanized pipe so that it doesn’t get completely crushed while you’re removing it.
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Have you ever used one of their tools? It's pretty weird that apparently all of their tools only exist as computer drawings. I didn't see a photograph of a single tool - even the simple things. Go figure.
R
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On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 21:00:39 -0800, RicodJour wrote:

Interesting. But man, what weird tools they have!
I'm not a tool collector, but, if I were one, I'd be salivating over these specialized tools!
I'm still looking for prices on the net (maybe will have to call tomorrow) but the catalog sure has some GREAT looking tools (diagrams only though - no pictures whatsoever!).
http://www.perfectoproducts.net/uploads/pdfs / PerfectoBinderCatalog_2010.pdf
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On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 21:00:39 -0800, RicodJour wrote:

You know. I find them all over the web now when I search for "right angle pipe wrench".
All the drawings (so far) are drawings. No pictures. That "is" weird. http://toolmonger.com/2008/08/05/right-angle-pipe-wrench /
http://www.nextag.com/Perfecto-1700-D-Right-531382836/prices-html
http://www.faucetdepot.com/prod/Perfecto-1700-SD-Right-Angle-Pipe-Wrench -% 28Super-Deluxe-Kit%29-20059.asp
http://home-and-garden.become.com/perfecto-1700sd-right-angle-pipe-wrench - super-deluxe-kit--compare-prices--sc1154031766
I wonder why there aren't pictures of the thing ... just drawings???
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I have one in my truck and I can even tell you where you can buy one if you're in Southern California.
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Please post a picture. I find it really odd that someone would use a computer graphic instead of an actual photograph of their product. That's vaporware territory.
R
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Mine looks just like this. I almost always use a couple of pipes a cheater bars with it.
http://www.faucetdepot.com/faucetdepot/ProductDetail.asp?Product=20059&AffiliateID=SingleFeed&utm_medium=shoppingengine&utm_source=become
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On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 20:41:14 -0800, Molly Brown wrote:

Now THAT is the kind of tool idea I was looking for!
Who'd have thought a "right angle pipe wrench" even existed!
The description says: The Perfecto Right Angle Pipe Wrench is the best tool for the worst jobs. Set the wrench head on the pipe or stubborn nut and make sure the grip is tight. Then insert the extension piece into the socket on the wrench head. Now you are ready to twist away.
And, I like the idea of the "crush proof pipe plug" so that the 50-year- old threads sticking out aren't crushed inward by the force of the pipe wrench.
I'm surprised it has enough leverage; but that's what the T handle is for, I guess.
It's not easy to find prices but they have a store selector so I should be able to call in the daytime tomorrow to find prices. I might even be able to rent it somewhere now that I know what to ask for.
This seems like the perfect tool for the job, albeit it may be expensive.
I also found, on that same web site, this "Outside Easy Out": 7000-EO - Perfecto Outside Easy-Out http://www.perfectoproducts.net/index.php?page=outside-easy-out
The description says: Perfecto's Outside Easy Out offers another way to remove stubborn pipe nipples when an ordinary wrench won't fit. Simply tighten the bolts around the nipple and turn the Easy Out with a Meter Key.
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On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 06:20:58 +0000, Harold Lathom wrote:

Looks like the right angle pipe wrench is about 225 bucks: http://www.faucetdepot.com/prod/Perfecto-1700-SD-Right-Angle-Pipe-Wrench -% 28Super-Deluxe-Kit%29-20059.asp
Not cheap. But cheaper than a plumber! :)
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On 1/27/2011 12:39 AM, Harold Lathom wrote:

Pssst! Harold, "http://tinyurl.com /" :-)
TDD
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On Wed, 26 Jan 2011 22:30:50 -0800, Smitty Two

Water pipe is pretty soft. I had a similar broken off nipple at the wall, but it was 1/2" pipe. I had plenty of old chisels I picked up at flea market. Quickly tapered one that was bit over 1/2" wide on the grinder, hammered it into the broken nipple, it bit right in, and I cranked the chisel shaft to get the nipple out. The OP might be able to the same with the right size/hardness bar stock, but with 1 1/2" there's a lot more torque needed.
Unless he's willing to risk going into the wall he should listen to those here suggesting putting something on the existing nipple. There are plenty of almost ready made solutions nowadays. Like others have said, drains aren't subject to much pressure. They also don't cause a catastrophe when they fail. My test is filling the sink to the brim, or both if it's a double, and yanking the plugs. If the fittings are dry after that, it's good. Don't know about dishwasher effects though. That's something else to test before you put your tools away.
--Vic
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On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 04:11:27 +0000 (UTC), Harold Lathom

I worked for a company that remodeled old buildings for years. This was a common problem. Those nippled hold lots of crud and stay wet all the time. They just corrode away in time. They were sometimes as thin as tin foil. A strong twist with a wrench and they will collapse. Sometimes that collapse will crunch them where they enter the tee and you can chisel away and eventually crush the threads till it comes out. But often they break off leaving part of the threads in the tee.
In all the years I did this work, I can only recall breaking a tee or other fitting twice. They usually hold up pretty well.
I dont recall seeing too many go thru cabinets, usually just plaster. But there were a few. I would cut a hole in the cabinet, maybe 4 or 5 inches all the way around (8 to 10" square). Bust out the plaster behind it till you see the tee. Get in there with a chisel and try to collapse the pipe along one side (start on top if you can swing a hammer easily). If it collapses, you can often crush it (like I said above). If it breaks off, chisel out the pieces from the threads, and you may have to buy a costly 2" NPT Tap, or rent one. Re-thread the tee. Just take your time. It's a pain in the ass job but we always managed sooner or later.
Now, here is another idea. Does this pipe go into an exposed basement right below? If so, make a hole above the tee in the wall/cabinet. Use a sawsall to cut off the vent pipe about 5 inches above the tee. Chop, pull, saw, bust, yank out the tee and pipe below it to the basement. Replace the whole section of pipe from the basement and the tee with PVC. Put a short stub of PVC above the new tee and atttach to the vent with a fernco coupling (rubber clamped thing). This way you're rid of the whole mess of old cruddy pipe. The vent pipes generally dont corrode out as badly and are fine.
You could also cut a hole in the wall above the cabinet and cut your vent pipe up there and do the same as I just said.
--
If all else fails, there's always duct tape :)

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On 1/27/2011 4:50 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Me and my friend had to remove a 4" pipe plug at an old building and it came apart. We were able to pick the pieces of metal out of the threads and replace the plug with a threaded PVC plug. That darn drain can be a lot easier to snake now.
TDD
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I need to remove a 50 year old nipple from my wife's chest. It's a 50-year-old 2-inch diameter nipple on her left boob. It sticks out horizontally and protrudes about a half inch from the boob. I want tit removed. How do I remove?
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snipped-for-privacy@ontheair.com wrote in

The nipple is hers to do with as she wants. Are you jealous that it's larger than your wee-wee?
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