ideas for leveling floor

A freind asked me ideas on how he could level his floor.
My feinds kitchen is in the korner of his house, and that corner of the house has settled... so now the floor is unlevel
I talked to him about sheeting it with 3/4 or so sub floor. this would give him a chance to cut a long tapering wedge for each joist.. and cap his old floor. the existing floor is 1" wood t/g old flooring.
any ideas are appreciated.
another option is to raise each joist along the band where the foundation has settled....?
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wheat germ wrote:

Fixing the foundation is probably the best choice as fixing the symptoms won't necessarily stop it...
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Two or three 20 ton hydraulic bottle jacks can be had for $60-$80. Sounds doable enough to me.
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NuWave Dave in Houston



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I've done minor adjustments on a large garage and a sunroom using a floor jack and some 4x4s. Just be sure to use spreader to distribut the forces appropriately.
Bob
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HAve to agree with fixing the problem first otherwise you may be douing these repairs every few years. If you are planning on ripping up the existing subfloor it would be easier to sister the joists with a 2x4 or 2x6 that is set level. Otherwise use to 3/4 plywood to build up the one corner and then use a leveling compound that you just pour on the floor and trowel down.

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As the others have said, proper leveling from foundation to support beams, adjusting teleposts, jacking rogue joists, etc, is the proper and long lasting way to repair. But if that isn't practical for you, I'd suggest a gypsum lath solution. As long as the leveling problem isn't way understated, gypsum lath is often used even in new construction, to give a solid, level base for tiles or even lam flooring. You pour it into place, level with trowels, screeds etc. But note, its not really meant to fill in huge problems( like 4 inches over 30 feet.)
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see my comments below, same should apply to you. Make sure your foundation is in good shape as stated in other posts, the rest of the replies are pretty much bullshit ideas
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