ice cube madness

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PD wrote:

Which is also why, if the entire Artic ice shelf melts, the ocean level will rise exactly zero feet.
This is not true of the Antarctic ice fields - they've got southern ice.
If the Arctic ice melts, however, the salinity of the oceans will change and all the fish will DIE. Bathers will no longer have to worry about sharks, true, but Pirana will be able to live in the ocean...
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This is also true. Unfortunately, if the Arctic ice fields melt, then so do the Antarctic ice fields, though there may be some short-term (~10 year) anisotropy. And there is far more ice in the Antarctic than in the Arctic -- about 8 times as much.
PD
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jmcquown wrote:

There is a similar question about a boat full of iron ore sinking in a canal lock. The water level does not change because floating objects displace water equivalent to their weight.
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True, but beyond that, most things expand as they melt.
Ice is one of the few solids that is less dense in solid form than liquid form.
And that's a good thing, otherwise, lakes and oceans would freeze from the bottom up.
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And sunk objects displace water equivalent to their volume.
A boat full of iron ore has a density greater than that of water, else it would not sink. Accordingly, the volume it displaces when sunk is less than the volume it displaces when floating.
The level in the canal goes down.
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Nope. The water level drops.
In the boat, the iron ore displaces a volume of water equivalent to its weight. Once the ore sinks, it displaces only its own volume of water. As water is significantly less dense than iron ore, the water level goes down.
You're confusing this puzzle with the one about floating ice cubes. Even Mr. Wizard got that one wrong
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But if the ore is more dense, it would not float in the first place by itself. That is only a portion of the puzzle. The boat also had air pockets, lighter material in the hull, etc. If all of it sinks and air pockets remain, the level goes up.
If you took iron ore by itself, it would sink right away and raise the level, but it never did float in the first place so it just moved water. .
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wrote in message

Bzzzz! Sorry, you lose.
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jmcquown wrote:

Googling is less work that posting and reading a replies... so I don't buy your excuse, Jill.
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Most thing shrink when frozen. Water expands when it freezes and can exert a lot of pressure. Thusly, when ice melts the volume decreases.
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re: Most thing shrink when frozen
Which is why I avoid nude beaches when the water's cold.
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jmcquown wrote:

Very much good answers, it's nice to see people sharing their ideas and knowledge.
As far as the ice water thing goes, I seem to remember some science show explain it some years back.
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On Tue, 18 Mar 2008 02:20:39 -0700 (PDT), monkey snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

When I had roommates, it used to annoy me how they would fail to fill up the ice cube trays after they used ice.
Eventually I got down to no roommates, but still they came in and used my ice.
Eventually I figured out that the ice was sublimating, going from solid to gas without passing through a liquid state. It happens whenever there is air above the ice, and if you don't use your ice for weeks or months like me, it's very noticeable.
They make some ice-cube trays that are bottles with caps. I tried one and it worked but the cubes were little balls, and too small.
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wrote:

And this is why some people take the ice cubes out of the trays and put them in bags, so they don't disappear.
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Actually, I took them out of the trays and put them in bags so I would have more than 24 cubes available.
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