I want to make a floor roller


Instead of renting one for $20 a day or buying one for $350 I'd like to make one. This is only for rolling a glue down floor, not for linoleum. I was thinking about mixing concrete or cement in a 5 gallon bucket, letting it harden and then somehow removing the bucket. Sounds stupid, but I think that's really all I need to have it work. It's too hard to justify spending $20 a day (which I'll need multiple times).
Is there something that I can line the bucket with so the cement comes out easy and clean on the sides?
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Buckets are tapered. That idea won't fly.
You could get a piece of PVC pipe of some diameter. You would need to cast a center axle through it or create some centered up axle point depressions in the ends.
Most flooring asks for a 100# or more roller. Concrete weighs 150#/cubic foot. 6" diameter = 3" radius =.25ft - r^2=.0625sq ft - times pi= .196sq ft - times 3' long=..588cf - times 150#/cf 88# A bit on the light side. Either more diameter or more length, or a more dense material (maybe that is why the pros use steel!). Pipe starts to get expensive past 6", but you could add more weight on the handle(s) ___________________________ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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Me and a buddy made one using a steel pipe filled with scrap lead. then added some brackets to hold extra lead weights.
By the time I was done I decided buying a roller would of been better, although I have the roller for future projects in my shed
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Excellent idea! I guess if I want to make it exactly 100lbs I could use 3.4 ft of 6" diameter. Thanks for the suggestions. I never thought of buckets being tapered, but makes perfect sense, since they often need to be stacked.
Thanks again.
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When I was younger I used a commercial size rolling pin (like from the kitchen) and my body weight to do the job.
I doubt you will find a bucket that is a perfect round. Most of them have a taper. Some sonotube might work if you painted the inside of it with an oil based paint first.
Or were you just trolling?
Colbyt
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Colbyt wrote:

Why remove the sonotube?
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removable weights that go on the handle are nice, making it easier to move around or travel in car.
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Not removing it is fine. The purpose of the oil based paint is to prevent moisture absorption while the concrete is still damp. That and the driest mix possible will keep the thing as round as possible.
Colbyt
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On Tue, 5 Dec 2006 20:08:38 -0500, "Colbyt"

I dxon't know what sonotube is, but couldn't you just rub it with motor oil or cooking oil. I usually use vaseline for things like this, but I think it is more expensive than the two oils.

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I have no idea why one would do any of the above. Sonotube is a cardboard tube made for forming columns that is made to peel off the concrete once set. I don't know how appropriate it might be as a roller because the sonotube leaves a noticeable and feelable spiral pattern in the concrete unless you buy the finish free style. Form release can be used, but it is rare in my experience if the tubes are fresh and haven't been exposed to long term sun, rain, and elements. ___________________________ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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6" dia. 4' long sonotubes are cheap. No need to remove the tube after you pour the concrete in it, in fact it would be better if you left it on. (more padding)

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On 5 Dec 2006 16:23:23 -0800, smith snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

USe sonatube, and don't remove it at all.
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