I want to kill the weeds in my St. Augustine grass

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Ive only had to use roundup a few times on a newly sprigged lawn. This gave it the fighting chance it needed to take off. Only had chinch bug one time and Spectracide took care of that.
Jimmie
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On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 15:27:32 -0500, "bob callaway"

You want to KILL...... Everyone wants to KILL.......
You're a killer and a murderer. I hope the police arrest you before you do any more killing. Today you will kill weeds, next week it will be the neighbor's pets, and the folloeing week you will kill the neighbors and their children. You're a very sick and deranged psychotic murderer. Get help, you need it...... Just go to your nearest police station, walk inside, and say to them "I WANT TO KILL". They'll lock you behind bars where you will be unable to kill ever again. Go now. Do not delay.
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On Mon, 15 Mar 2010 04:58:00 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@mynips.com wrote:

"then the sargent came over, pinned a medal on me, said you are our kind of boy and sent me on down the hall"
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Scott's Weed and Feed if it's a nice healthy lawn. Unless you have those weeds that have "spurs". I can't think of the name of them right now, but there is only one product that will kill them. It's very expensive and you have to get it from a specialty store. Home Depot or Lowes doesn't carry it.
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Globe sedge is what it's called, and it is very hard to get rid of. Some lawn services won't even guarantee complete removal.
http://www.turffiles.ncsu.edu/Weeds/Sedge_Globe.aspx
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Ron wrote:

Our lawn service and the neighbor's were surprised when we got rid of dollar weed (southern version) with Weed B Gone. Worked very quickly on a lawn that was covered with it. The little that remained was spot treated and S.A. grass fills in pretty quickly...good reason to use after fertilizing grass.
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Ron wrote:

fairly new home that had this stuff in it. I had to spray Roundup on 3/4 of it two years ago. My lawn looked disastrous all that summer. I interviewed two lawn pro's and they both told me to do the same thing. I was ready to rip the lawn out and rock it in as it is a small patch, in my front yard. This is a five-year process and I need to keep on top of it. This is my third summer coming up, and I have made quite a bit of progress. I just need to keep on top of it.
You are not alone with lawn problems.
Good luck, I wish I had the answer for you.
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Ron wrote:

We have a nasty pest in Florida, one of many household plants that become invasive...asparagus fern. Not a fern, but a nasty, spiky vine with lots of tubers. They bear berries that birds carry off and really mess up hedges, etc. Cut to the ground, wait for new growth to reach about 3" and then paint with a brush and Roundup. Rather fussy, but much easier than trying to dig them up. Did same with a few lawn weeds that were tough. Would work nicely for the occasional dandelion.
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My experience with living where St. Augustine flourishes: A climate where everything else grows as well. One MUST mow their St. Augustine every week, or if you don't, you have to do more than one mowing to cut it down a little at a time. Where St. Augustine flourishes, people don't know what an irrigation system is, as there is plenty of moisture and rainfall to keep it going.
Hence, an abundance of weeds. You have gotten some good advice here with specific weeds. Your local nursery and co-op should be able to help you, too. Look into pre-emergent herbicides, and these, if applied at EXACTLY the right time, can cut down on a LOT.
Spendy, though.
HTH
Steve
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And always cut with the mower deck at 4".
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Steve B wrote:

Whaaaaaat? Florida? Don't know anyone with S.A. grass who doesn't have an irrigation system....too much water in summer, none in winter. Last year, Tampa was so dry they got down to forbidding lawn watering. But, then, during the recent freeze the strawberry farms had to water to protect their crops and caused a rash of sink-hole collapses. Ah, paradise...pythons, fire ants, monitor lizards, poisonous toads, walking catfish, tourists.

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On Tue, 16 Mar 2010 23:05:25 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net"

Just last week, became an open season on pythons and monitor lizards in Florida. Fire ants, walking catfish and Buffo toads have been there for years.
*Save the oranges and berries
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wrote:

Home 1 that I mentioned in this thread didn't have a sprinkler system.
When it needed watering I used the spikes.
One thing about that lawn though, it was lake front (back of house to the lake) and that part of the lawn looked awesome! Never had to do anything to it. And I'm talking about a LOT of St Augustine. Back yard was about 200' W by 150' D (depending on how high the lake was).
First thing I did after buying that home was go to Sears and buy a 42" riding mower.
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How far down in Fl do you have to be for SA to stay green all year round?
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I'm in Orlando, and home 1 stayed green all yr long. Just didn't have to mow it in the "winter".
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Let me add to that. I bought the home from a contractor, and he added about 2 ft of topsoil before laying the sod. The back and one side of that house was always in direct sun light, so it was very healthy.
The home I own now, has no topsoil, so that doesn't help matters.
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On Tue, 16 Mar 2010 21:00:00 -0700 (PDT), JIMMIE

Tampa will be green all year but like Norminn says, for about 3-4 month of that year you will be putting about 27,000 gallons of water per acre per week on it minimum to keep it green (1" of water per week). If it turns brown you will probably lose it. We got a real good chance to see that here in Ft Myers when the foreclosures stopped getting watered. The yards were deserts in less than a month and when the rains came there were just weeds. I will stick with my Bahia. It comes back just fine from a drought. They already restrict when and how much water you can put on the lawn. I guarantee it is just a matter of time here in Florida before they just ban watering your lawn completely. It is pretty short sighted to be putting your drinking water on the grass. The problem will probably just be cured with the price they will have to pay for it.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Hell's bells! By the time you put 1" of water on a Florida lawn, half of it will be back in the aquifier. You can saturate the root zone with a lot less than 1". This is where proper mowing and feeding come in - cut it high, at least 3" and preferably 4", and keep it healthy so it doesn't dry out. The city waters during the day, when homeowners are forbidden....nice afternoon wind and the water blows across the street:o) We converted a good deal of lawn to islands with hardy plants, and difficult areas to river rock. Building code forbids "all stone" lawns, allowing stone for just areas that won't grow green stuff.

We are again talking about putting reclaimed water into the aquifiers. Might save on medical expenses, given the levels of pharmaceuticals found in ground water :o) Drink your Prozac daily and nothing will bother you, even lumpy water :o)
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On Wed, 17 Mar 2010 08:18:34 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net"

That is what SFWMD recommends. Most homeowners with a green lawn in April are exceeding that.

Reclaimed water is far from universally available. When Cape Coral installed their system it cost the homeowners over $12,000 to hook up (no choice) and they quickly ran out of reclaimed water. They were making up for it by pumping from the fresh water canals. Eventually the canals were going dry. They were still under water restrictions. The idea that this water reenters the aquifer is flawed too. It goes into ground water but potable water usually comes from the deep aquifer, 200' down, below the rock barrier. Nobody wants to water their yard with the ground water because it stains anything it hits and it literally smells like shit (septic tank effluent). The reality is most of this irrigation water just flows into the gulf. That is why we have so many red tide blooms and algae. The fertilizer elevates phosphates and nitrates in the estuary.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

Johnson Grass. I got rid of most of it two years ago spraying Roundup on 3/4 of my lawn. It looked awful all summer. Now, I just take a paint brush and paint the leaves, and eventually the new stuff will die. At least the yard does not look as bad as it used to. I was told this is a five-year ordeal, and it is working. I am going on three years now. Digging them up did not help as the tubers are way underground.
I was told the birds bring it in, plus I believe two of my neighbors have it, and are not aware that it is a noxious weed.
I don't know, I may be wasting my time, because if the neighbors' have it, the wind will blow it into my yard.
Oh the joys of home ownership.
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