I never throw anything away

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Some times it looks like my garage is cluttered but those old bolts etc can be used in other ways. Do you never throw out stuff especially if is has possible multiple use options? Guess it could be called part saving. Funny I save no electronic stuff with the exception of various cables but find the connectors keep changing like UBS or firewall. Sort of makes recycling harder for sure.
--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden



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On Tue, 16 Nov 2010 18:02:54 -0500, Bill who putters

I have a problem throwing stuff away too. I have 2 sheds and a room in the house that look like this too.
Your mission, find the Harley in this picture (1970 FLH)
http://gfretwell.com/ftp/garage.jpg
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You are a very sick person but I'd guess you know where every thing is sometimes. I intend to keep your image perhaps mount it to keep the neat police at bay.
Sick Bill.
--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden



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On Nov 16, 7:09 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Please start the Harley so we can follow the sound.
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On Tue, 16 Nov 2010 17:43:52 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

A real Harley guy could smell the leaking oil. ;-)
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On 11/16/2010 6:09 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Under the boards and behind what looks like a carpet cleaner. Darn! I knew I'd find a use for those X-ray glasses some day. 8-)
TDD
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FWIW, I think the lost bike is to the right of the grey coil of wire(?) and the left of the rectangular bucket with the blue label with the red line across it. I assume that because the reflective license plate (we have to turn ours in now under serious penalty) is overexposed as it would be in a flash photo at precisely the right angle. What is the vehicle with the red milk crate and orange wire in the back? We have a lot of the same junk, although my wife would fail you big time on the fluorescent lamps stored glass out. (-: And maybe that sky-hooked ladder depending on its moorings.
I have a personal question. Feel free to ignore it. Are you both married, singled, widowed or what? I married late in life, and as part of that Faustian bargain (which has worked out pretty well so far) I agreed to a serious decluttering of my bachelor life style. Implementation, however, has proceeded at Federal contracting speed (as in not much progress for the last 4 years and then a sudden flurry of work as final deliverables come due). (-:
However, a big move (our last, we've agreed) is on the horizon and has brought a sort of shocking realization. Nineteen Pentium 3 and 4 class machines will have to go, the collection of 3/4" furniture-grade plywood and scraps must go, 300' or so feet of double-slotted shelving standards and matching brackets must go (my junk is at least well organized!), stacks of old VCR, receivers, TV's, cassette decks, darkroom gear, CCTV gear, conduit, miles of smurf tube, spools of wire (250' 12-2 Romex NIB OS - marked $14.23 - guess what year I bought *that*), all must go. Oh, the humanity. Not moving looks pretty attractive compared to the ocean of junk that needs to be dealt with!
Anyway, our big concern now is what are of the US (or maybe even outside the US) meets our needs and desires and isn't going to turn into a "tax the property owners to death" state because of the projected shortfalls in local government revenues. She wants to be near an area with good skiing within driving range (mostly because flying is now such a hassle) and I want to live in a climate like San Diego. So far, it's been a tough search.
-- Bobby G.
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They have a series of shows on TV these days called "HOARDERS". The guys and gals on tv make you guys seem like beginners.
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On Tue, 16 Nov 2010 18:04:08 -0800 (PST), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

Just recently in Las Vegas a woman went missing. After days of decay they found her body under a pile of hoarded stuff. The husband was the usual first suspect. He was cleared of any wrongdoing.
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wrote:

Somebody find the cite for those two brothers in New York City, I believe. They had a whole building. They made booby traps, and one got caught in one of his own under tons of newspapers. They found him a few years later. They had even brought in a Ford Model T frame and partial car. Happened probably in the thirties or forties, and they found out about the missing brother when the surviving one got sick.
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wrote:

Collyer Brothers, the patron saints of hoarders:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collyer_brothers
Homer Lusk Collyer (November 6, 1881 - March 21, 1947) and Langley Collyer (October 3, 1885 - March 1947) were two American brothers who became famous because of their snobbish nature, filth in their home, and compulsive hoarding. For decades, neighborhood rumors swirled around the rarely seen, unemployed men and their home at 2078 Fifth Avenue (at the corner of 128th Street), in Manhattan, where they obsessively collected newspapers, books, furniture, musical instruments, and many other items, with booby traps set up in corridors and doorways to protect against intruders. Both were eventually found dead in the Harlem brownstone where they had lived as hermits, surrounded by over 130 tons of waste that they had amassed over several decades.[1]
-- Bobby G.
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wrote:

That was very similar to the case of Homer and Langley Collyer.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collyer_brothers
Langley was suspected in the death of his brother and was the subject of a huge manhunt after his brother's body was discovered when neighbors complained about an unpleasant odor. It turned out he had died a few weeks before, killed by a booby trap of newspapers he had made to keep thieves out. His blind and invalid brother Homer also died soon after Langley, who had been caring for him. The newspapers of the time kept running articles about the supposed treasure trove the brothers had in their mansion which inspired near nightly raids on their house. Hence the booby traps, which like so many other such traps, ending up trapping its maker and not the criminals it was intended for.
Hoarding is an affliction that seems to bother observers a lot more than it does the hoarder. In many cases, when there is an "intervention" the hoarder either quickly restocks the hoard or dies very soon after from the incredible stress of watching stuff (mostly junk) that they've come to treasure, being dumped in the trash. Just imagine how you would feel if someone came in and threw out most of your belongings? In the case of hoarders, they attach great value to things you and I would consider junk. So, to them, it's as if someone came in and junked their big screen TV, their tools, their clothes, etc.
It's thought to be an obsessive-compulsive disorder, but its causes, treatment and cure are still quite elusive. I save stuff because once I have something, and know where it is, it becomes part of my brain. Throwing it out seems to be like deliberately forgetting something. Many of the hoarders I've seen are quite intelligent and well aware of their "problem" and show very little interest in changing their ways. There's a hierarchy of hoarding listed here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compulsive_hoarding
I am not quite sure where I stratify, but I think it's level II (or maybe III).
-- Bobby G.
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wrote:

Though not common, it happens more than you think.
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On Tue, 16 Nov 2010 20:53:37 -0500, "Robert Green"

Married but my wife keeps my junk contained in the garage, shed and my computer room.

I have a room full of PC hardware too.. We have 8 or 9 around the house doing something and I have another dozen in various states of assembly.
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Ah, a combination of peaceful co-existence and containment. (-;

Just a room full? (-:
I gradually replaced them with Fujitsu tablets from Ebay that had touch screens ten years before the Ipad showed up and that draw about 17W each (and even less on standby) compared to the 135W the desktops ate. The desktops were all hand-built, and each one was usually a slight improvement over the one it was replacing. The years that PIII's were evolving saw an incredible number of "must have" changes - USB 2.0, XGA, gigabyte hard disks, CD and DVD burners and more. It's not that way anymore. The only thing the old 400-600MHz PC's won't do well is record/process HD TV or play the latest video games (SFW!).
Ironically software of the period has no problem playing MPG files and DVD's, but not versions that are just a few years newer. Now programmers are so used to having oodles of memory, CPU and diskspace that nothing's coded compactly or elegantly anymore. I just bought a Toshiba laptop with Win7 because a few sites we deal with demand more recent software than W2KPro, but I hate it. I would like to know how much productivity has been lost nationwide having people learn new ways of doing things that aren't really better, just different. I recall Steve Jobs saying that Apple's quicker boot time saved the world thousands of man years when you add up all the time people sit around waiting for their PC's to boot up. I mean why change "Find" to "Search" unless you're just out to confuse your customers?
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

I pick up old computers at the 2nd hand store, get them going and give them away to someone that doesn't have one. A pretty good hobby and cheap. Some of the P4s I hate to let go but there's always another one sooner or later. Main problem lately is people are taking the hard drives out before donating them to the God place that has the 2nd hand store. That place is filling up with old CRT TVs as people switch over to HDTV.
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message
<stuff snipped>

I used to give away the old machines, but it turned out to be a bad idea. I became the technical support for such machines, and a common complaint was "They won't play <insert popular game of the month here>" I would tell the parents that's a GOOD thing, because kids will be using the machines for schoolwork and not game playing. Didn't matter.
I finally gave up after one person kept installing animated cursors and boatloads of some of the seediest looking PD shareware garbage that slowed an already slow (200MHz PII) down pretty seriously. It was still absolutely fine for schoolwork, running Quicken, making Powerpoint presentations, etc. I ran for years doing programming and WP - had an AST TurboLaser board and laser that went with it (that's about the time HP won the laser printer wars). I told them that at the time, the machine and laser printer were still worth at least $700 and they were over $6000 new. Something just slightly faster from Circuit City would cost at least $1000 and wouldn't come with a laser printer or any service other than "you need to reformat and reload."
One day, when I realized I hadn't heard from them in a while, I called only to find out that they had "junked it" and as far as I could tell, they were still having the same old problems with their new Circuit City computer, multiplied by 10 because now they were on the Internet and corresponding with Nigerian Princes with slight banking problems. (-:
And that's why there are 19 PC's stacked in the basement. Less trouble for me to hang on to and possibly be able to restore an Email from 15 years ago if I ever needed to. I stopped doing almost all my tech support efforts after that, figuring that the old saw was right "no deed goes unpunished." I am kind of looking forward to seeing which ones will start up after a 5-15 years nap. I'm betting it won't be many. My laptop collection has not fared well without exercise. The New Year's resolution that I would exercise them lasted about as long as they all do. Some beep, some don't and some have their CMOS backup batteries located in impossible to service places
-- Bobby G.
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On Thu, 18 Nov 2010 23:27:09 -0500, "Robert Green"

I also have a wall of beige in the basement. Luckily it really doesn't take up much room since it's only 6" thick or so. I could probably just pull all the drives, copy all the data onto a tiny sliver of a spare 1tb drive, and get rid of them all. But they do no harm sitting there. One is a 450 that I overclocked to 500. One is a 120. Somehow I doubt I'll ever need them again.
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On 11/19/2010 8:39 AM, dgk wrote: (snip)

My other living room and 3rd bedroom resemble that remark. Glad to see I'm not the only one.
--
aem sends...

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On Tue, 16 Nov 2010 20:53:37 -0500, "Robert Green"

Club Car golf cart
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