I need some advice about retro-insulating a cathedral ceiling.

A couple of years ago a raccoon ripped open an eave vent in a cathedral ceiling next to the chimney and just above a casement window and moved in. It took awhile for me to catch on. I eventually caught and relocated several raccoons and had the vent repaired. I sleep just beneath that cathedral ceiling in the loft. B4 the repair I was able to sit in the casement window and hold a digital camera in the hole and snap a few pictures. It appeared that any insulation in there had been pushed back. I'm guessing fiberglass batts. The repair was combined with re-siding several months later, and the insulation was never replaced (my bad). I can confirm this in both winter and summer by reaching up and feeling the temp differential in that one 16"? run in the ceiling. I can touch the ceiling from the loft. I'm thinking about cutting a wide hole through the ceiling sheetrock and blowing some cellulose into that run. How doable is this (inside the house), and what alternatives are there?
p.s. there is some chance that I may reroof in the near future (hail damage). This roof is 2 1/2 stories up. Would it be easier to do this repair then? Of course the roofers in this area are swamped and want to do the roof and run to the next job.
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fixing it from the outside would be better, but at two stories up it might be tough. I would try to get a roofer to do it, and if that didn't work, you can always go back to fixing it from the inside. you might try cutting a smallish hole in the sheetrock and sliding a hose down there and blowing cellulose in working it up. that's a lot of work too. you'll have to get a blower for one bag of cellulose, create the mother of all messes, etc. the other option is to remove sheetrock from most of the joist bay and use fiberglass batts. then you would have a large patch to contend with.
finding z0 wrote:

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marson wrote:

Pretty much where my thinking ended up as well. Another issue is how to prevent the cellulse from blocking either end where the air circulates to the eave vents. It's a half roof with eave vents on top and bottom. Some suggested making a small hole and pushing foam peanuts up there....not sure if they are right for the job...lol...
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Foam peanuts? Sounds like a bad idea. Cellulose? Sounds bad too: you DO want air circulation just under the roof surface, you DONT want cellulose in a place that might get even a tiny leak, and cellulose makes a huge mess (it was worth it to do my whole house, but anything less would have not been worth it). I'd go with fiberglass from inside.
've learned that the _size_ of the patch does not matter so much -- more is the complexity of the job. This would be a real easy job, b/c you have the two rafters on either side. Cut the drywall right down the center of those rafters, maybe 6 feet long and one bay wide. Add your fiberglass. Then replace the drywall. You have the half rafter on either side to screw it on to (and to add screws on both sides of the cut). At the top and bottom, you can leave it loose and just do drywall tape, or stick a 1x4 up behind the cut to give you something to screw into.
-Kevin
finding z0 wrote:

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technically you need ventilation. however, leaving one rafter cavity without ventilation is not going to cause a total system failure.
kevin wrote:

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marson wrote:

Is this true? I never thought much about it, but seems like you might just end up with only one area of ruined, useless, leaking, melted shingles rather than a whole roof full of them. Is that much of an improvement?
-Kevin
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Lowe's and home depot sell some ventilating baffles made of thin foam so you have a path for air to circulation from soffit to ridge/roof vent. The ones I saw come in 4 feet length and are as wide as most roof rafters. Then you lay your insulation between them and your sheetrock ceiling and you have ventilation next to the roof and insulation next to your ceiling.
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