I need ideas for a support bearing for a spinning table.

I need to spin a 24 inch round table at about 150 RPM several hours a day. The motor will drive a belt going around just under the table at a circumference that allows the slow speed. What I can't find is a lazy susan or bearing that I can attach under the spinning table and to the top of my work stand. Because the motor is driving the table it is also pulling it sideways so a standard lazy susan bearing might not work as they are designed for force downward, not sideways.
Any thoughts.
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i built a 24" lap grinder that spins at around 125 rpm under load. i used the following plans: http://mrcol.freeyellow.com/grinder/flat_lap_grinder.htm and just scaled them up for 24". i used 2 pillow blocks and a couple of pulleys to make the arbor, and 2 flange blocks to support the axle.
chose the pulley sizes to get the speed you want. if you want my spreadsheet that has the part numbers and places i used, send me an email. remove the obvious from the address.
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Check out http://www.mirror-o-matic.com/ for some ideas.
George Anderson Montreal Canada

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Charles Spitzer wrote:

Ouch!
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Hi,
Any of the ball bearings types that one normally thinks of are called "deep groove" bearings.
They will take a load downward (axial), as well as sideways; usually pretty substantial in each direction.
Try a company like Bearing Specialties, etc.
Bob ----------

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Andy Dingley wrote:

Current Dodge truck front hubless designs come to mind. Maybe the 1 ton model, 2000, 2001 year. Bottom flange ( inboard on the truck ) will have 4 threaded holes so you can bolt it to something. The top flange ( outboard on the truck, where the rotor and wheel attach ) will have eight studs. Maybe 5-6" total height. Nice big ol' tapered bearings in there, too. That'll handle a load!! And guess what? With rim / tire assembly on the vehicle, it turns out to be almost a 24" diameter if not more. Put a side force on it all you want, that's how they work in their designed environment. Multi-directional load.
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Jack R wrote:

What are you going to do with this thingamajig? Cosmetics important? If you can find a junk potter's wheel, it might work.
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wrote:

150rpm is quite fast for 24inch diameter. It's fast enough to need things fastening down to it.
For a hub, go to a scrapyard and get a car front hub. Something with a Macpherson strut often allows easy unbolting and re-mounting. A brake disk can make a base for the table.
Rubber toothed belt drives will easily drive by friction alone onto a turned cast iron cylinder and a toothed pinion on the small diameter motor shaft.
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Drive the table with a rubber wheel at the edge, and put one or more idler wheels across from the drive wheel. What's this for, pottery?
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