I may attempt to murder a gopher ... I just might stoop to that level (so help me God)

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On Sat, 30 Nov 2013 18:54:40 -0800, bob haller wrote:

I try not to kill even the black widow spiders I catch almost weekly and baby rattlesnakes I catch ever few months.
I relocate them to a far corner of my property. These gophers, I'd relocate, if I could. I first tried noxious chemicals to try to French them out, but, so far, that hasn't worked.
Now I'm moving one notch up, by soaking them out. I have hilly property, so, on purpose, I chose a hole that was halfway on a hillside. There is about four feet above and below the hole that is soil (concrete being on both sides of that).
So, I'm hoping that the 5,000 gallons of water I just put into two of those holes will flush them out. They're welcome to find another spot to live, as I have plenty of non-grassy land further from the house.
Let's hope they got the hint, because I plan on giving them another 5,000 gallons of water (4 hours, 3/4" hose, 80psi) from the two hoses again tomorrow.
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as a child i tried to flood chipmunks out. they dug drain holes so the water didnt effect them...
burrowing animals are excellent engineers
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On Sat, 30 Nov 2013 21:57:21 -0800, bob haller wrote:

This, I don't doubt. Simply because I put 5,000 gallons into the soil (by my calculation) and absolutely none if it rose to the surface.
The ground absorbed (almost) all of it! (Cracks weeped in the concrete.)
Seems to me a good week of rain, which is what we get in California during the rainy season, would add to the soil far more water than I can flood into that gopher hole. Right?
And they live through that every year.
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On Sat, 30 Nov 2013 01:41:57 +0000, Danny D'Amico wrote:

(preliminary) LESSONS LEARNED:
1. My first lesson learned is that it's just not worth trying to irritate the mole out of the yard with noxious chemicals. Mainly, it doesn't work; and secondarily, it costs $8 a gallon (or so) for the chemicals (when a reusable trap only costs $9).
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3668/11125640846_9fe016e77b_o.jpg
2. My second lesson learned is that flooding them with water isn't worth it either. Maybe it worked, maybe it didn't. I don't know yet. But, after flooding for two days at 2,500 gallons a hole, that's 10,000 gallons of water that started leaking out of my concrete anywhere it could leak out.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7319/11179083966_23c0d4a04e_o.jpg
3. My third lesson learned is that I should have tramped down *all* the gopher holes *before* beginning the "treatment". I can't tell if the flooding worked or not. So, today I raked over all the mole hills, so I can tell if he's gone for good.
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2842/11179226013_8f1f1d15a3_o.gif
4. My fourth lesson seems to be that the cheapest effective way to get rid of the gopher will either be this rat poison or that Mcabee gopher trap!
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7378/11179081816_b9a5a510a1_o.gif
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On 12/2/2013 3:10 PM, Danny D'Amico wrote:

Trouble is, addlepated gopher wanders out of burrow, is eaten by family dog or neighbor's cat, and now you have a situation on your hands. Learn to trap. Use Macabees, and trust me, you will get them, and catch new ones before they make too much of a mess. Just put the trap at the freshest dirt, and like you said, rake off the dirt so you can see the fresh stuff, and that identifies the active tunnel. They will make several, one for food storage, one for breeding and raising young, and alternatives for escape routes, and further food gathering when the roots are ready to be eaten.
It's a pain, but once you learn how to trap, you will get them in a day or three, they don't make a mess all over, and for some reason, other ones stay out of the yard, and it's a long time inbetween. Maybe they smell the tunnels of the removed gopher, and think there's one there, and respect its territory?
Watch it with the poison. You might have more than a dead gopher in your yard in the morning.
Steve, King of SW Utah pocket gopher stalkers, Great Poohbah and Mucketymuck of Gopher Assassins of Utah Lodge #1847.
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On Tue, 03 Dec 2013 12:19:40 -0700, SteveB wrote:

This is a good point.
Especially since the rodenticide I bought is the type that kills on first eating, but takes a while, so they eat a super-lethal dose.
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On Tue, 03 Dec 2013 12:19:40 -0700, SteveB wrote:

After having talked with the Federal EPA and the California Department of Pesticides, I see now that poisoning the rodent isn't really all that good of an idea.
The so-called second-generation anti-coagulants, which I just bought three pounds of (bromadiolone), will deliver a lethal dose on the first feeding, but, they won't die for a day or so. They then come back for a second and third feeding, building up a super lethal dose.
If they die inside their burrows, nothing bad happens, but, if they die outside, then whatever eats them also dies.
Hence, the EPA and California have both banned the second-generation rodenticides from being easily bought by you and me.
Pros can buy them, but, in large sizes only (the EPA told me 8 pound sizes, but, I read 5 pounds). Either way, it's more than one person would need for a while, so, they've effectively banned them from homeowner use.
Luckily, I was able to buy three pounds of the stuff, so, I'm ok for a while, but, I won't use it outside on the gopher. I'll just use it inside on my garage shelves and drawers.
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On 12/04/2013 11:30 AM, Danny D. wrote:

Dudes! Two words: C-A-T S-H-I-T !!!!
My sister lost a cat to secondary poisoning. That is why we researched and came up with the cat shit treatment. (She is single; she has lots of replacements.)
Speaking of spending eternity in the bad hell playing golf with Stomin' and folks who talk in theaters and fart in crowded elevators, after my sister did "the deed", I called her up and apologized profusely, telling her I was only kidding and I did not expect she'd actually do it. She threatened to kill me. It is good to be a brother. I wonder if Stormin' cheats at golf?
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On Fri, 29 Nov 2013 18:33:42 -0800, bob haller wrote:

I don't know what caused all these holes, but, they are scattered every two feet on my lawn in all directions!
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5513/11179222783_08363dba2e_o.gif
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On 12/2/2013 3:25 PM, Danny D'Amico wrote:

Google pocket gopher. That is what you got, and you got more than one.
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On Sat, 30 Nov 2013 21:57:21 -0800, bob haller wrote:

I give up on trying to flood them out! I noticed today, that the hole I flooded was filled in with chips. I'm not sure if the wind did that, or if animals did.
I didn't see any new gopher holes, but, silly me, I didn't tramp down all the gopher mounds, so, I can't really tell.
So, today, I bought some poison and traps:
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3698/11179223833_f7d60e1e57_o.gif
And, I raked over all the gopher mounds on part of the lawn:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7452/11179223143_98d3de1280_o.gif
If any new mounds show up, the poison & traps will go in next!
*BTW, do gophers cross a driveway?*
I have been treating one side of the driveway only; but I have gophers on both sides.
Do they cross the driveway? Or, are those separate burrows?
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On Mon, 02 Dec 2013 16:00:13 -0800, Oren wrote:

Let's hope it's not a fish because I was shocked that the two little 20x20 foot areas that I flooded each absorbed about 5,000 gallons of water without even showing a drop at the surface!
The ground has an amazing capacity to soak up water! (Of course, it has only rained once since about May.)
In California, when it rains, it pours; so I wonder how the gopher keeps dry when it rains for a week?
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