I may attempt to murder a gopher ... I just might stoop to that level (so help me God)

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On Tue, 03 Dec 2013 12:23:00 -0700, SteveB wrote:

Not worried about the "grass" as I haven't watered these lawns since about May when the last good rains came through from the Pacific Ocean! :)
My plan is to get rid of the gopher, and then cover the "lawn" with wood chips. Seems to me that the gopher should go away if I take all the roots from the plants away; but I don't know my enemy all that well yet, so, I can't say that for sure.
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On Sat, 30 Nov 2013 05:10:28 +0000 (UTC), Danny D'Amico

Before you go down this road, you should watch "Caddy Shack". It's only funny because it's true.
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On 11/30/2013 10:26 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I remembered there was a Bil Murray movie. Yep, that's the one. Thanks for reminding me.
--
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Christopher A. Young
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On 11/29/2013 10:10 PM, Danny D'Amico wrote:

One thing any hunter needs to do to be successful is to know their prey. You don't.
Gophers make blockages in their tunnel systems that they can take down or put up. Your gases may not get to the gopher, are dangerous for you and your yard, and just won't work as effectively as trapping.
Once you learn to trap, it is simple, and you will be able to catch one in 12 hours or less.
Of your methods, exhaust gas works best and is the safest, although it may kill grass and plants.
Steve
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On Sat, 30 Nov 2013 10:31:30 -0700, SteveB wrote:

That's why I'm asking here ...

I can't imagine the gases being dangerous for me, outside, in the fresh air, on top of a mountain, nor can I imagine them being bad for the yard (remember, plants 'eat' carbon dioxide, and 'poop' out oxygen).
However, I *can* imagine trapping being more efficient.

The only problem with trapping, at the moment, is, (a) I don't have a trap (so I need to buy one), and (b) I think trapping kills them.

I've never done it, so, maybe there is something to that, but, on cursory inspection, plants *love* carbon dioxide. It's what they live on.
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I tried that once. Shoved the hose in as far as possible (6-8 feet) and let it run. Our soil is sand and all the water did was soak in, burrow never flooded. Went to pull out the hose, no way...the burrow had collapsed around it and I had to dig it out. YMMV
I've learned to live with gophers. They move around quite a bit so wait and he will go next door.
--

dadiOH
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On Sat, 30 Nov 2013 07:03:30 -0500, dadiOH wrote:

I'm giving up on the water flooding gopher solution method!
I don't know if it worked yet, but, after 10,000 gallons was poured into two gopher holes, I noticed *all* the concrete cracks weeping.
For example, here's a shot of the steps below the gopher hole:
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3715/11179226133_86a0c03165_o.jpg
And, here's a shot of the retaining wall at the bottom of the steps:
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5496/11179035805_c4a201a50c_o.jpg
Seems to me the water might be damaging things, so, if it didn't already work on getting rid of my first couple of gophers, I'm giving up on it and moving on to something else!
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On 12/2/2013 3:14 PM, Danny D'Amico wrote:

Very logical and very smart. That would cost a lot to fix or replace.
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On Tue, 03 Dec 2013 12:20:35 -0700, SteveB wrote:

Yea. Flooding them out isn't such a hot idea after all.
Turns out just *buying* the Mcabee trap scared them away! I checked the two 20'x20' "lawns" today (separated by a walkway) and there were *no new gopher holes*.
Wow. All I did was buy a trap, and the gophers went away.
Maybe the water trick *does work*; but still, it's not all that efficient, in that you're risking far more damage, and you're consuming 10,000 gallons of water & electricity to pump it all out of the ground.
Anyway, I have other "lawns" (separated by a driveway), so, I will still get a chance to use that trap after all.
The one good thing about the trap, especially since gophers tend to be solitary creatures (when not breeding), is that it would be concrete when they're caught.
At the moment, I'm *thinking* that the water made them go away, but, I won't know for another couple of days.
Meanwhile, I'll put the trap in use on another "lawn".
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On 12/3/2013 2:14 PM, Danny D'Amico wrote:

I told you they were good.

Seems like I either killed them, or just made it inconvenient for them so they moved. Then I had to fill in all the holes the water made, and found places where it washed out a lot of fill, and that concerned me.
Believe me, if you learn how to use that trap, it works very well. Just make the hole wide enough and tall enough. It has to be wide enough for the springs to extend, and tall enough so you can push it down the tunnel a ways with your finger on the back of the trigger so that you don't set it off setting it. I haven't got caught by one, but by the look of some of the gophers I have caught, it looks like it hurts big time.
Steve
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On 12/3/2013 11:43 PM, SteveB wrote:

Seems to work for moles, too. $20. Probably scared them away...it is a nasty looking machine. ;o)
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On Tue, 03 Dec 2013 21:43:45 -0700, SteveB wrote:

:)
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On Tue, 03 Dec 2013 21:43:45 -0700, SteveB wrote:

Hi Steve, My experience is similar. As I showed in the photos, water was seeping out of everywhere (concrete steps, concrete retaining wall), so, I'm not really keen on gushing them out anymore.
I have plenty of other neglected lawns (the landscaper must have had a big budget because they're scattered all over the place) where I'm sure I have gophers to trap. But first I'm going to put wood chips on the two lawns that I've cleared of the gopher.
Then I'll move on to the lawns across a driveway.

I only bought one trap, but, the illustrations show using two, back to back.
Do you use two? Or just one?
Do you bait with a carrot or something?
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On 12/4/2013 12:19 PM, Danny D. wrote:

No, the trap is trigger activated. They are very sensitive, and tricky. It works when the gopher pushes against the trigger that is standing vertical. The two hooks come together across their chest. No bait at all. I have seen lots of variations, even some that act like a guillotine. The Macabee is simple, lasts forever, and works once you learn how to set it properly. They work best at the end of a tunnel, rather than in the middle of one. Hence, look for the freshest dirt dome, or damp dirt in the middle of a cone that has just been pushed out. That means an active tunnel.
Steve
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On Wed, 04 Dec 2013 21:25:55 -0700, SteveB wrote:

That's interesting!
It makes sense then, that I would face it toward the tunnel and, that there would only need to be one macabee at that location.
Thanks.
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On 12/5/2013 2:57 PM, Danny D. wrote:

gopher going in ONE direction. Hence, you want it where they will be coming head first, and that is at the END of the tunnel. There are some that work in tunnels, but you have to dig down, and clear a lot of dirt, and have them set just right. AND, gophers have been known to nip fingers of intruders.
Steve
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On Thu, 05 Dec 2013 18:06:19 -0700, SteveB wrote:

Wow. That, I'd be surprised to see!
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On Thu, 05 Dec 2013 18:06:19 -0700, SteveB wrote:

OK. It's easier near the gopher mounds anyway. Saves me the trouble of locating a main runway.
Thanks for the advice.
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On 11/29/2013 10:55 PM, Danny D'Amico wrote:

My trailer park has a trap they put out, and they do catch and move and release. Wasted effort. On the roads near me, I see woodchuck / groundhog all the time near the roads. Scampering about. This part of the world has plenty of them. I could trap and kill five a day, and hardly affect the population.
You may be unable to do much about things.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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On 11/30/2013 08:24 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

http://www.wildliferecipes.net/game_recipes/Small_game_recipes/Woodchuck_recipes/index.asp
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