I'm Back - New Question About Grass


I posted here about two weeks ago concerning the problem I had in my lawn about Johnson Grass (a weed). I applied Roundup on the patches, just like the lawn service company told me to do.
So far it is going OK. I reseeded my lawn where the bad patches were, and am already getting a little bit of new grass. I reseeded last Weds. and the temps were perfect - 75 - 85. Now, we are back into the mid 90's so I have been lightly watering a lot.
Now I am wondering what is the best way to mow this new grass. Should I mulch it or bag it?
I won't be ready to mow until 3 - 4 weeks (my best guess), so I thought I would ask this question ahead of time.
I am having my mower tuned up right now, and the blade will be sharpened.
Thanks again. Everyone's help is much appreciated.
Kate
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Mow it however you mow the rest of the lawn, it doesn't matter.
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My neighbor used to fuss over his lawn. He's now dead. The new neighbor takes care like a normal person. Go do something more important.
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On Tue, 05 Aug 2008 12:24:23 +0000, Stephen King wrote:

My kind of thinking.
Leave it grow until it goes to seed. Then cut it as high as the mower allows and leave clippings to mulch. The tall grass provides shade for seedlings and retains water. Recut again when it goes to seed. Repeat as required but no sooner.
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keeping the grass taller also chokes out and prevents weeds. They can't get started. Short lawns invite weeds.
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Grin, I wish! Naw the city gives tickets if not cut often enough here. Long before it gets to seeding level.
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I didn't write the above, but it's good advice. Even in olaces wher it is frowned upon, keeping the grass an extra inch or two tall makes a huge difference in keeping weeds down, and reducing the need for watering. You don't have tto let it grow 6 inches of more to get a worthwhile benefit. Just set your mower to the highest setting, and the lawn will still look very neat and manicured.
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I hope you did not use the roundup that states no planting for 6 months, mulch it
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No I did not.
ransley wrote:

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On 8/5/2008 12:30 AM Kate spake thus:

Not the answer you were looking for: get rid of the lawn. Manicured, well-watered lawns will soon be a thing of the past, along with leaded gasoline, gas-guzzling automobiles and carefree consumption. Get used to (and ready for) the new world of water shortages.
--
"Wikipedia ... it reminds me ... of dogs barking idiotically through
endless nights. It is so bad that a sort of grandeur creeps into it.
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I agree with you. That is one reason I moved out of my large home three years ago, and into this smaller one. Yardwise, it is a cinch. I have mostly rock which is used alot in WA State.
This patch of grass is very small.
David Nebenzahl wrote:

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It depends on where you live -- after two years of drought here, if you poke a stick in the ground, water comes gushing out. All the houses in this area have artesian wells and some leave them running 24/7, in order to have fountains and running streams in their landscaping. I had to dig a wide hole and pump from it in order to drain an new 18" trench that an electrician needed to use for outside wiring. None of our trees have tap roots because of the high water table, and the predominant species is cypress swamp. Although the government has a two-day-a-week watering restriction because of the drought, no one pays any attention to it, including the local government.
Actually, I've turned off my irrigation system because the daily afternoon storms keep everything well watered. I think the point of your comment ought not to be that someone is going to start controlling yet another aspect of our lives, it is that homeowners ought to be intelligent enough to have a landscape that fits into the local climate, and the local government ought to be smart enough to allow the landscaping to suite the local needs. That's particularly a problem in retirement areas, in which people come from other areas and try to impose their old standards on the new area, just because they're used to the look of turfgrass, or plantless lakes, and don't understand how their new home differs.
It may be that in your area gravel and cactus are the preferred landscape and 55 mph the self-imposed speed limit. A yard lacking vegetation here would look silly and quickly be overtaken by weeds and mildew -- it's not a suitable climate for that austerity. Similarly, with few people, lots of wide open spaces and long distances to drive, someone trying to hold to 55 mph is going to be blown off the road by 99% of the other vehicles.
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