I just saw a home improvement tip that might work

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On 8/31/2013 6:54 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

The fix was to replace the OEM open back 4 terminal ballast resistor with the sealed 4 terminal ballast resistor available from NAPA. I've had two problems that affected the engine on my 89 Dodge van and it was a clogged sock on the in tank fuel pump because someone (perhaps on the assembly line) had installed the pump with the sock folded over leaving only a quarter coin sized bit of screen for the pump to draw fuel through and just a little bit of debris clogged it up. The other was a defective Hall Effect sensor in the distributor. Two hard to find yet simple problems that were hard to find. Decoding the computer codes led me to the distributor problem and experience made me suspicious of the fuel pick up in the gas tank, which is a huge plastic tank by the way. The engine in the old critter always runs now no matter how long it sits. I haven't done much driving since I dropped dead or been able to get the 24 foot extension ladder off the ladder rack but the old van is patiently waiting for my return. ^_^
TDD
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CY: Bother, didn't know they were available.
I've

CY: you know, one of my vans had a clogged fuel pickup tube. No sock on the end. A neighbor showed me how to get the fuel tube out, knock the ring to the left, and pull the tube. Had to run the fuel level down, in the tank. That took a couple days. Just a tube, with no sock. I reamed it out with a coat hanger, and it worked much better.
The other was a

CY: Bummer on the distributor. I've seen two instance of defective pickup coil inside the distributor, both on GM. No, make that three. My Chevette had a pickup coil with bad wires, rubbed through.

CY: You named the truck Lassie, I'd guess?

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On 8/31/2013 9:03 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Nope, "Big Red" the hunk of metal is a maroon color. ^_^
TDD
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On Sat, 31 Aug 2013 07:54:37 -0400, Stormin Mormon

The "silver beauty" MSW wires were about $19 at the time and would start with a garden hose running over the engine. I NEVER had damp start problems on ANY of my many Mopars - 53 241 hemi, 57 fargo flathead 6, 63 valiant 170, 69 dart 225, 75 dart 225, 76 ramcharger 318, 85 lebaron 2.6, 88 New Yorker 3.0, 2002 PT Cruiser 2.4

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On Sat, 31 Aug 2013 07:54:37 -0400, Stormin Mormon

Too late. The damage is done.

The frame would have had to be replaced. The garage wouldn't even touch the job. Understandable, the rest of the truck wasn't worth it, anyway. Hope this is the last one I buy.

I thought Nova == no-go. The '70s were bad for all cars.
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On Sat, 31 Aug 2013 16:57:11 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Sure was a bad decade. They had seatbelt interlocks for safety, mandated low pollution and were just getting into the MPG thing making lighter cars. It was a decade of learning experiences.
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The decade the government started serious intrusions into our lives, "to protect us", or "for the children", yes. Bad time and that's been a one-way trip.
As far as the (US) auto manufacturers go, it was a decade of cost reductions and planned obsolescence. Cars were *designed* to last three years. After all, that's what "people wanted". ...until the Japanese showed them the error of their ways. It took another decade or three to actually learn the lesson, though.
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On 8/30/2013 8:14 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Ayup... female type I dated for a while had a '69 Valiant (in the late 90's - early 2000's) and literally all the work that was done to it over a period of about 5 years was that I rebuilt the front suspension (bushings were dry rotted so an inspector failed it for that and tie rod ends) she put new tires on it and once when it sat for a couple weeks I had to replace the carb because dipping the original carb in cleaner to clean it out revealed that the jet block was disintegrating. She never set the valve lash and had a heavy foot so somewhere in there it got a head rebuild. Oh, and the usual ballast resistor replacement. Other than that it basically took gas and oil and just ran, we drove the snot out of it. It was registered as a regular old car and passed safety every year. Wish I knew where that car was today; I'd have bought it off her when she was done with it, but apparently she got offers on it all the time and just took one, and I apparently wasn't near the top of her "favorites" list at the time.
nate
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<...snipped...>

I had several Darts & Valiants years ago too, gave up the last one , a '73 in the late 90's as I recall. They were indeed rugged, easy to work on, and reliable though needing maintenance somewhat more frequently than today's cars. 200,000 miles on the slant 6 was not unusual. The difference was, one of those slant 6's with 200,000 miles would typically need a quart of oil every 500 miles or so. I have a 96 Cherokee today that has 200,000 miles and doesn't need a single quart of oil between oil changes, which I do at 5000 miles. And it sure has a lot less rust on it than a 17 year old Valiant or Dart would.
--
When the game is over, the pawn and the king are returned to the same box.

Larry W. - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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I doubt the rubber is strong enough to do any good.
You might be able to slot the head with a dremel and small cut off wheel. Use slotted screw driver.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 8/27/2013 1:43 PM, Metspitzer wrote:

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On Tue, 27 Aug 2013 14:59:36 -0400, Stormin Mormon

Bad plan. If you have damage the thing, use an EZ-out. Replace.
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You really need to know Jesus, so you have a plan.
Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org

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On Wed, 28 Aug 2013 13:04:06 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Ah, so it doesn't matter if it's a bad plan?
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On 8/28/2013 8:50 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

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On Wed, 28 Aug 2013 23:04:38 -0400, Stormin Mormon

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On 8/27/2013 1:43 PM, Metspitzer wrote:

How will that help stripped threads?
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Very little. Might help stripped screw slot.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 8/27/2013 5:38 PM, Al Borland wrote:

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I think it's about stripped heads. I have no idea what part the rubber band plays.
This site makes a similar claim:
http://lifehacker.com/5462520/remove-a-stripped-screw-with-a-rubber-band
I'm not buying it.
--
Dan Espen

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'Dan Espen[_2_ Wrote: > ;3113262']

> (http://tinyurl.com/ye8qcum )

I'm thinking there might be some science to support it.
The coefficient of _rolling_ friction between iron wheels and steel railway track is very low, which is why trains get surprisingly good fuel economy once they're up to speed.
Now, when you're turning a stripped screw with a screw driver, it's really the friction between the driver tip and the screw head that's preventing the tip from slipping. That's STATIC friction, whereas trains are all about rolling friction, and I understand the two are completely different. But, I also know that friction is one of the least well understood phenomena in this world. So, lets presume that there is low friction at a steel on steel contact.
By putting the rubber between the screw driver tip and the screw, you now have a very much higher co-efficient of friction both between the screw driver tip and the rubber and between the rubber and the screw, and therefore very much more friction preventing the screw driver tip from slipping.
However, it seems to me that what a person would need here is THIN rubber given the small clearance between the driver tip and the screw drive, so I think a better tip would be to use a condom or a latex rubber glove, both of which are made of much thinner rubber than an elastic band.
Anyhow, that's the best I can do.
--
nestork


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On 8/28/2013 11:33 PM, nestork wrote:

I have put a small piece of sandpaper in the screw head before to get a better grip but sometimes the paper is too thick to get in there. ^_^
TDD
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