I just saw a home improvement tip that might work

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I never tried this, but the tip says if you have a stripped Phillips screw, you can put a rubber band between the tip and the screw to help remove it.
Good idea?
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On 8/27/2013 1:43 PM, Metspitzer wrote:

Coarse valve grinding compound works better, if you have some handy.
nate
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On 8/27/2013 1:12 PM, Nate Nagel wrote:

The supply houses were selling a squeeze tube of a grease like compound that had grit in it and was meant to allow a damaged Phillips head screw to be removed easily without the driver slipping. ^_^
TDD
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On 8/27/2013 4:58 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

That sounds like... exactly the same stuff :)
Can't blame them though, as your typical FLAPS probably doesn't sell valve grinding compound anymore as hand-lapping valves is pretty much an obsolete procedure. I think I picked up a little tin at an automotive swap meet ages ago and still have most of it.
nate
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On 8/27/2013 6:39 PM, Nate Nagel wrote:

I believe modern engines have hardened valve seat inserts in the heads to resist wear since the lead additive, which would lubricate the valve seats, has been taken out of gasoline. Of course you must have valve seat inserts in aluminum heads but I think even iron heads need them with today's unleaded fuels containing ethanol. I don't think good old valve lapping compound with the rubber stoppered hand lapping tool would work on the newfangled hardened valve seats. ^_^
TDD
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Really, the best solution is for more Americans to ask for Robertson or Torx drive screws so that your hardware stores start carrying them.
I've been doing DIY work for well over 20 years now, and I don't even keep any Phillips or slot screws in stock. Everything I have in stock and use now is either Robertson or hex drive.
Once you guys start using Robertson screws, you'll never want to go back to Phillips drive.
So far as the stripped Phillips head screw goes, I'd try jamming a small slot screw driver into the drive diagonally and try turning it that way. Drilling the head off and twisting out what's left with a pair of vice grips would be my next move. I agree that trying to grind a slot in it with a Dremel usually doesn't work. That's because often the slot isn't in the middle, and when you twist with the slot screw driver, you only end up breaking off the smaller part of the head.
If you have good access to the head, another thing to try would be to grab onto the head with a pair of side cutters and try to twist the screw out that way.
--
nestork


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On 8/27/2013 11:07 PM, nestork wrote:

All of the newer circuit breaker panels I've serviced or installed have Robertson screws on the breakers, the neutral and the ground bars. The large connections are the traditional Allen socket lugs. I've seen the Robertson screws showing up more often plus the Torx, both standard and tamper resistant, have been around for a while in vehicles and all sorts of equipment I work on. ^_^
TDD
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'The Daring Dufas[_8_ Wrote: > ;3113354']

> sorts

Do you notice that you can put a lot more torque on a Roberston screw without getting that queezy feeling that the screw driver tip is about to slip out of the drive?
Robertson screw drivers almost never slip out of the drive on the screw.
--
nestork


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On 8/28/2013 10:55 PM, nestork wrote:

I like them because I can tighten the lugs on breakers and the connections in panels by feel a lot easier than Phillips head screws because I don't have to push down hard on the driver. There is one thing about Phillips head screws, folks rarely use the correct bit, blaming their screw up on the screw. ^_^
TDD
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On Thu, 29 Aug 2013 01:25:31 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Yup. With the right bit on a new screw you can hold it almost sideways and it won't fall off the bit. Too big, too small, forget it.
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The new LOX screw drive:
http://tinyurl.com/oaq3kot
Or, Robertson rethunk.
--
nestork

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On 8/29/2013 2:51 AM, nestork wrote:

It only works in bagel materials or as an oxidizer when used with rocket fuel. ^_^
TDD
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On Thu, 29 Aug 2013 06:24:55 -0500, The Daring Dufas

LOX makes bagels too crunchy.
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On 8/29/2013 4:24 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Hum, there's something fishy about that. O_o
TDD
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On 08/29/2013 03:03 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

This thread is sure spawning some interesting replies....
Jon
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On 8/29/2013 6:34 PM, Jon Danniken wrote:

It is showing some fertile thinking. Of course someone may chum in and ruin it all by laying an egg. ^_^
TDD
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On Thu, 29 Aug 2013 05:55:46 +0200, nestork

Square drive is all I use for wood, unless it's something that comes with it's own screws. People argue about drive types. But they all work for me. And bits are dirt cheap, so you can have them all.
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On Thu, 29 Aug 2013 01:40:23 -0500, Vic Smith

If I'm buying the screws I prefer Torx but I agree that I'll use whatever. Philips does have the advantage of camming out rather than breaking. Drywall screws, of course, are Philips.
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On Thursday, August 29, 2013 5:33:45 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Yes. Phillips screws are intended to cam out to prevent putting on too much torque. If you need more torque, like on an electrical connection, Phillips is the wrong choice.
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wrote:

Which is why Phillips are so common in electrical wiring, right? ;-)
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