I invented a 2-phase DC battery pack

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On Sun, 01 Dec 2013 10:31:09 -0500, Emma Genius

LOL! Best post of the year!
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On 12/01/2013 12:49 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Thank you! :-)
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On 12/1/2013 9:31 AM, Emma Genius wrote:

Connect a vibrator from an old tube type car radio and with the proper transformer and circuitry, you can make AC voltage. There was a time when the word "vibrator" described an integral component of vehicle mounted tube type electronic equipment. ^_^
TDD
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On Sun, 01 Dec 2013 16:03:56 -0600, The Daring Dufas

over 40,000 volts, 115cps power on the leading edge of a hood for a very effective "burglar alarm"
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On 12/01/2013 05:25 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Maybe Elon Musk will put them on his new cars?
A 2 phase 40kV peak-to-peak 115 cps DC alarm system sounds impressive. ;-)
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On 12/01/2013 05:03 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

There was a time when the word "vibrator" described an integral component of vehicle mounted tube type electronic equipment. ^_^

Would that be single or 2 phase AC?
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On Sun, 01 Dec 2013 16:03:56 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Well, it's now an optional add-on but it's still a type of tube that gets mounted.
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On Sunday, December 1, 2013 10:31:09 AM UTC-5, Emma Genius wrote:

Since you're a genius, perhaps you can do what no one else here except myself has been able to do and that is give a definition of the electricl engineeing term "phase". You have 10 people pontificating on it, yet not one of them can define it. I gave the defintion a week ago.
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On 12/1/13 9:31 AM, Emma Genius wrote:

Suppose you wanted to run an irrigation system that requires three phase, 480 to operate. Suppose the local rural power company could only supply you with single phase 480. Suppose Emma Genius then built a rotary phase converter to make that three phase load run from single phase. Suppose that rotary phase converter created only the third leg of the three phase to operate the three phase load. Where did the other two necessary phases originate to operate that three phase load?
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On Monday, December 2, 2013 6:05:15 PM UTC-5, Dean Hoffman wrote:

I'm still waiting for one of the "experts" to give us their definition of phase. They've been talking about it for a week now, but not one will define it.
I'm also waiting for a response to the two phase student excercise I posted earlier. They all seem to agree that two phase existed 100 years ago. They have no problem with it being called two phase, that was the only legitimat two phase according to them. So, that system had two phases, let's call them A and B and a neutral. Phase B was 90 deg off from phase A. Everyone OK so far?
Now, instead of having phase B be off by 90 degrees, let's make it off by 120 deg. How many phases are there now? I say two. Let's change it again, so phase B is off by 220 degrees. How many phases do we have now? I say two. Let's change it to being off by 170 deg, how many phases do we have now? I say two. And now, let's change it to be off by 180 deg. How many phases do we have now? I say two. And if it they agree that it is indeed still two, then it is in fact electrically identical to split-phase 240/120V service, so you have two phases there too.
QED
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On Mon, 02 Dec 2013 15:50:47 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

All you are doing is reversing the leads on your scope to get a fake second phase. Your cheap trick will only fool an imbecile.
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On Monday, December 2, 2013 8:29:20 PM UTC-5, Edwin wrote:

Complete inability to address the simple and carefully outlined learning excercise I gave, noted. Inability to even define the term "phase", as requested noted. As is the name calling which is what you're left with when you don't have engineering or the facts on your side. And for the record, a scope wasn't even involved.
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On 12/03/2013 01:03 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I need a new furnace. Are two phase furnaces more efficient and where can I get one?
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On Tuesday, December 3, 2013 5:04:51 AM UTC-5, ralph wrote:

Again, complete avoidance of the intellectual excercise on phase I outlined above noted. No answer to the simple question of giving a definition of the engineering term "phase" noted. Smart remarks don't build a case.
I can define it. And I'm still waiting for an answer why a system with two phases that differ by 90 deg is acknowledged by everyone to have two phases. If they differ by 240 deg, that's two phase right? If they differ by 170 deg, that must be two phases, right? So, what magically happens when they differ by 180 deg that suddenly there are no longer two phases? And how do the electrons know?
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On 12/3/2013 8:25 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

For a garden variety split-phase supply (240/120V from a transformer with a centertap) are there 2 "phases"?
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On Tuesday, December 3, 2013 12:07:05 PM UTC-5, bud-- wrote:

Non-response to the simple thought excercise on phase, going from what everyone agrees is two phase, to what is electrically identical to the 240/120V split-phase service. Non-response to repeated requests for anyone on the other side of this to define the term "phase". How can you talk about it, yet not one of you can define it?
As to your question, IDK why you're asking. My answer is clear and has been discused at length. The answer is Yes. The author of the engineering paper presented at the IEEE conference of power engineers agrees. As do the several white papers/app notes from electrical eqpt manufacturers, etc. that I've cited as well.
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On 12/3/2013 11:27 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

As previously posted, in the second half of the abstract the author suggests a _change_ from the standard practice and wants to call split-phase 2 phase. No vote on his suggestion is recorded. In the first half the author says the standard practice is to call split-phase single-phase.
The abstract does not agree with you.
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In maths/physics, you have two phases with a mathematical relationship of -x (or a 180 deg phase shift).
In electrical distribution, two-phase is a specific jargon term which means something else.
There's no one right answer - it depends on the context of the discussion.
--
Andrew Gabriel
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On 12/3/2013 11:58 AM, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

The context is, specifically, in US power distribution is a split-phase supply called 2 phase with a phase A and phase B.
(Not "2-phase", which as you say is rather different.)
I don't think you have much split-phase over the pond. If I remember right, construction sites may have 120/60V circuits.
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No. 240/480V was only used on farms in very remote areas, and there were probably no new installations of this type since WWII (and there maybe none left by now, having all been upgraded to 3-phase).
It's not necessary elsewhere here because we run 230V 3-phase down each street, so houses which need more than 1 phase get a 3-phase 230/400V supply. (In reality, it's 240/415V for historical reasons.)
That doesn't work with the US 120/240V, because, to a first approximation, you can only carry it a quarter of the distance before the voltage regulation goes too bad (and the low power pole mount transformers actually make this much worse). This means you have to carry the high voltage supply down each street and use regularly spaced pole transformers to generate the 120/240V supplies. To keep costs down, there's usually only 1 of the 3 phases from the HV supply carried down each street, so you don't generally have access to a 3-phase supply in any one residential street.

Construction sites here use a safety supply of 110V with earthed centre-tap, i.e. 55-0-55 for single phase and 65/110V for 3-phase, but the 0V connection is only grounded at the transformer and carried to tools as a protective ground conductor, and never used as a power conductor, so these are never described as 55-0-55 or 65/110V supplies, because there's no neutral connection. This is designed to prevent electrocution of construction workers if a tool gets dropped into a puddle or the cord is damaged or something similar, as the highest voltage to ground is only 55 or 65V.
This safety supply used to be mandatory on UK construction sites. It's no longer mandatory (that would be contrary to EU rules on movement of workers and products), but it's what you'll still find on all UK construction sites.
--
Andrew Gabriel
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