I invented a 2-phase DC battery pack

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Here's what my genius mind came up with.
First I obtained a standard D-cell battery pack that holds 2 batteries in series.
Next I installed a center tap between the two batteries in the battery pack.
So now I have a series battery pack with three terminals:
L1 is the (-) negative terminal on battery A N is the center or neutral tap between battery A and B L2 is the (+) positive terminal on battery B
So to prove I have 2-phase DC, I connected a dual-trace oscilloscope as follows:
The reference leads from both probes were connected to the center neutral tap. Probe A was connected to L1 Probe B was connected to L2
As I expected, the scope showed a 1.5 volt positive phase trace and a 1.5 volt negative phase trace.
Clearly I have 3 volt 2 phase DC.
The only thing left to do is submit my paper to IEEE.
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Next on your to do list is Fire or the Wheel?
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On 12/01/2013 10:43 AM, NotMe wrote:

I may try to patent the idea though I'll admit my 2-phase DC has a lot of similarities with trader4's 2-phase AC.
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A perfect analogy. DC is simply AC with a frequency of zero!
Fred
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wrote:

Depending on how you look at it, DC doesn't exist in the real world. It's just a very low frequency AC. ;-)
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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Hi, If I measure battery output with 'scope, I don't see any slightest sign of wave form. Not even a noise. How come? We have distinctively separate DC and AC thpory. Ever heard of impedance in DC circuit? It is resistance only. If that is not the cae, we have to redo all the theories.
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The theories are good, you just need education on them.
One simple thing is the old teletype machines. They work by turning DC and on off in period of around 22 miliseconds to select the leters to be printed. The coils have an inductance of around 1 henry. While they will pull in the levers with as little as 10 volts, it will be too slow for correct printing. It takes so long for the DC to make its way through the coil and the maximum magnetic field to be generated. One way around it is to use around 150 volts and a series resistance of 2500 ohms. This keeps the overall current down but lets the levers pull in faster.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Hi, Are you talking to me? I worked on TTY too B4 I changed my career path. Then you counter EMF or fly wheel effect, things like that, Eh? Educated... I was in a p[osition to educate, Many times I was an instructor in many different gears and subject,
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Hmm, To increase voltage but not the current and also to minimize counter EMF. As well you know fly wheel effect..... Education is to teach the theory by understanding the math behind it and through experiment to confirm it in the lab. Theory without real life experience is useless. First thing I learned after leaving school, on the first job site.
Today's young engineers hardly do manual calculations. They just tap the keys on computer. When I showed my son old slide ruler i used to use, the look on his face....He is a consulting engineer in civil.
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On 12/01/2013 09:57 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:
[snip]

I remember the first class I had in trigonometry. Most of the time, the teacher was going around helping students find the (sin / cos / tan) keys on their calculators. There was nothing said about what trigonometry is, or why you'd want to use it (other than passing that test).
--
23 days until The winter celebration (Wednesday December 25, 2013 12:00
AM for 1 day).
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On Mon, 02 Dec 2013 15:27:10 -0600, Mark Lloyd

You do sin/cos/tan functions by hand? ;-)
I've only taken one trig class - 8 weeks (half a semester) in high school. They used the "unit circle" method, which was quite a good method of teaching. Understanding is much easier then mindless memorization and lasts longer.
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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz;3159500 Wrote:

I can't remember whether my old Hughes Owens slide rule had trig functions on it or not. It seems to me that it didn't.
Back before there were calculators, engineers would carry around a book called the CRC Handbook, published by the Chemical Rubber Company, whoever that was. That book had tables for squares, square roots, cubes, cube roots, trig functions, hyperbolic trig fuctions, etc. You would use those tables to find the values of trig functions if you knew the angle expressed in degrees or radians.
No one ever worked out trig functions by hand, although you could do it. There were Taylor series solutions developed for all the trig functions, and the computers of the time used those series approximations to generate sine, cosine, and tangent. For example, the Taylor series for exponential of x, sine of x and cosine of x are:
exp(x) = 1 + x + x2/2! + x3/3! + x4/4! + ...
sin(x) = x - x3/3! + x5/5! - x7/7! + x9/9! - ...
cos(x) = 1 - x2/2! + x4/4! - x6/6! + x8/8! - ...
where x3 means x cubed, or X times X times X, and the exclamation mark means "factorial". for example: 8! = 8 X 7 X 6 X 5 X 4 X 3 X 2 X 1 40320
So, you can do trig functions by hand, but the way you do them lends itself better to computer calculation.
--
nestork

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On Tue, 3 Dec 2013 07:03:58 +0100, nestork

My Versalog did. My HP45 did, too. ;-)

The Chemical Rubber Company, of course. ;-)

No, most people who needed such things carried a slipstick. The tables were needed only in the *very* few cases where extreme accuracy was needed. The damned CRC Handbook must have weighed 5 pounds. No one "carried it around".

No shit?
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A cheap slide rule I have has the sin and tangant trig functions on it. The wider the rule, usually the more functions on it.
I had a CRC book but it was not a 5 pounder. Just small text book size. Not sure if it was the whole book or just a book with part of the CRC book in it.
I remember seeing some films with a room full of engineeers with slide rules that were shown as desiging the SR71 Blackbird.
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Ralph Mowery;3159840 Wrote:

Did you know that the SR71 Blackbird was originally intended to be called the RS71 Blackbird. But, when President Johnson (I think it was) held a briefing to explain the project to some Senators that controlled the purse strings on black projects, he repeatedly called it the SR71 instead of the RS71.
So, they quickly changed the name of the plane from RS71 to SR71.
--
nestork

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Did not know that.
I was thinking it started out to be a fighter but there was a sudden need for the spy plane when the U2 was shot down.
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On Tue, 3 Dec 2013 17:00:31 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

Right you are. It came from a design for an interceptor, the YF12. The original plane was intended to shoot down Soviet bombers. Ballistic missiles shot those plans down.
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On Tue, 3 Dec 2013 14:11:13 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

The only scales a slide rule needs are the 'C' and 'D' scales. The rest are optional and included based on the target market. ...sorta like calculators.

That must have been an abridged version. The full handbook is about the size of three encyclopedia volumes.

Sure. Three significant digits is good enough for 99% of the engineering tasks out there. Two probably covers it.
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On 12/01/2013 09:57 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:
[snip]

I remember the first class I had in trigonometry. Most of the time, the teacher was going around helping students find the (sin / cos / tan) keys on their calculators. There was nothing said about what trigonometry is, or why you'd want to use it (other than passing that test).
--
23 days until The winter celebration (Wednesday December 25, 2013 12:00
AM for 1 day).
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<stuff snipped>
I have a great old Pickett circular slide rule that had two plastic index arms that would set to the numbers you were working with. IIRC, it was more accurate than a twelve inch slide rule but only on the outermost scales. I have a number of those - plastic, bamboo and aluminum -as well as beautifully chromed K&E drafting sets that are all pretty much obsolete. I still use vernier calipers and the B&S micrometer that I bought way back then, but all the protracters, triangles, french curves, lettering guides and Rapidographs are lying in a box somewhere, mouldering.
There's something that a slide rule teaches you about the elements of mathematical relationships that you just can't get from a computer.
--
Bobby G.




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