I have no water

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About a week ago my water stopped coming into house. This is another fix upper which I shut the water off when I leave. This was at the end the extreme Cold spell average zero, two weeks ago. been looking for water each day inside.
There is no dripping out of inside shutoff ball valve. I listened to pipe, no sounds. No visible outside water accumulation. I'm trying t find the outside shutoff, since some gravel was added, and now iced up. Today I pushed plastic tubing thru ball and feed pipe. I think it went all the way to outside shutoff.
Next week calling water company after I locate shutoff. Mystified. In see a cutout of laid asphalt across street. Blue arrow on top. The gas and water lines were marked by first call in the fall. I had to get new gas lined installed about 15 foot or less.
Greg
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wrote:

Roger. Code 8.
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On 2/7/2014 5:02 PM, gregz wrote:

the deep freeze again, and we should be down to about 5F tonight. I'm planning to leave the hot dripping at my kitchen sink. But, that does not sound like an option for you, if your line is frozen.
Around here, I think water dept uses blue paint, yellow for natural gas lines.
I hope you don't have a burst line, and that things work out for you when it warms up.
--
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Christopher A. Young
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Be a long wait for warmth. Im mentally unstable. I'm tired of cleaning snow and ice off car, cleaning driveway, huddled in living room with space heater. I got cabin fever. Wish I was in a cabin so I could play with fire.
Greg
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On 2/7/2014 10:15 PM, gregz wrote:

Yes, I can understand that. Time to saw a hole in the roof and blow the dust off your old surplus rifle? You know, the one you brought home from Cambodia in your duffel bag?
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On Friday, February 7, 2014 5:02:03 PM UTC-5, Gz wrote:

Most of the time the shutoff is at the meter. Do you have a meter? I think if you can push a snake or wire through then there is equipment that can trace it.
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Not sure how run is installed. I'm guessing everything is ok on my end. I was thinking of pushing camera through, but I would have to take off inside shutoff valve inside next to meter. I could not locate outside shutoff valve today. Going to use metal detector tomorrow.
Greg
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On 2/8/2014 10:25 PM, gregz wrote:

The water company's main valve is not at the meter? Usually they are in the same underground enclosure, but I have seen all sorts of stupid things...
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Not at my house. There's a shutoff just before the meter, both of which are in my basement. There's also a "main shutoff" out in the front yard.
Just the other day, a co-worker was describing a problem he had with the shutoff near the meter in his basement. He called the town's water authority and they closed the "main shutoff" in his yard so he could repair the shut off in his basement.
My dad's house, and my sister's house, which are in a different state than me, are both setup the same way.
I don't think any of those setups are "stupid".
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On 2/8/2014 11:40 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

That's because you are a disagreable sort. :)
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I disagree. :-)
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The gas hookup is similar here. The meter has it's own shutoff, and is now always outside. New installations also have the main shutoff inline with meter, so it's easier to find. On my space, the main shutoff are about 25 feet away. The problem house has shutoffs, not even 15 feet from house.
Greg
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On 2/9/2014 1:34 AM, gregz wrote: ...

That would be typical if meter in house...don't know your jurisdiction rules but generally in locations where I've been on central supply as opposed to own well, the utility considers everything up to the meter "theirs" and from there on "yours". If you don't have water at the meter, I'd think it's their problem.
Then again, all the locations I've been at have had the meter at the branch from the main so the run from there to the house is _not_ the utility's responsibility. Hence the situation I described earlier wherein a rogue self-styled contractor hid the reducing valve inline near the meter. A test similar to what you described earlier would have come to the same conclusion that everything is/was fine to the meter 'cuz there would have been no way to judge that what hit wasn't the meter, not a reducing valve nor _precisely_ where that was, not knowing exactly the path the line took when it was laid.
IOW, don't throw out the possibility of the unexpected...
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I know you said "generally" so I'll just tell you how it works where I live. The meter is in the house with a shut off just before it. In my case, the shutoff is about 6" from the block wall. The water authority considers anything inside the house to be mine. Thus the inside shutoff and the meter are technically my responsibility.
Years ago I wanted to install a shelf just above the meter so I called them and asked if they could come over an twist my meter 90° to make it easier to read once the shelf was in. They told me that's it's mine and all I had to do was close the shut off, loosen the nuts on both sides of the meter and rotate it. I really didn't feel like messing with the old plumbing and the shelf was not that important so I never did it.
If the inside shut off ever went bad, I'd have to call them to shut off the water at the underground shutoff and replace the inside shutoff myself.
To be honest, I'm not sure what would happen if the meter itself ever went bad. Obviously I'd need a current reading reading so they could keep the billing straight, but I don't know if I could just buy my own meter or whether they need to certify it, supply it or what. I'm sure I asked them years ago, but I don't remember the answer.
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On 2/9/2014 10:00 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Try taking it out and replacing it with a straight pipe and see what they think of "responsibility"... :)
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On 2/9/2014 10:59 AM, dpb wrote:

But, the real question is who's responsible for the run from the tap/cutoff from the main to the outside wall, then? If it's visible inside and no issues there and there's no water at that point out of the meter is it your problem or the utility's?
I'd think the more like breakpoint in a case where the meter is inside the house would be at the external shutoff--can't imagine the utility laying claim to the feed line to the house from that point.
But, I've never been anywhere w/ inside meters as outlined above -- they put the meter as close to the main as they can for precisely the reason of minimizing that supply line that's theirs plus, of course, in the olden days before wireless it was quicker/easier for reading to only have to walk the street easement.
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Here in Waterloo Ontario, with the meters in the basement, Inam responsible for the waterline from the shutoff at the street to the meter - including the inside shut-off, but the water utility owns the meter. The inside shut-off on mine was seized when they came to change the meter. I told them to shut it off at the street and a ran out to the hardware store and picked up a new ball valve. When I got back they had just gotten the water shut off. I grabbed my torch and swapped out the valve in about 10 minutes, and the installer was able to install the new meter. H e was impressed at how quickly I had that valve changed. (I stuck a small hose down the pipe and siphoned the water out to below the valve so I didn't have any water to boil out before melting the solder - he'd never seen that done before!!
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Unless the "low spot" is under the floor ----. My pipe comes up through the floor, straight up to the shutoff valve, LB into the meter, and straight up from there to the basement ceiling.
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On 2/9/2014 2:25 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Which is precisely what I would expect and surmise would be OP's case as well...it makes no sense otherwise.
OP just needs to get to it and determine if his supply is frozen at the street or after...or wait 'til the spring thaw since apparently it's no crisis.
--


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We do our own readings and mail in a card once a quarter. In the 25+ years I've lived here they have never come into the house and verified a reading. They do keep some sort of eye on the numbers because they called me a few months ago to ask that I read the meter again and give them a call. It seems that someone else who lives in my house, whose marital relationship to me will go unmentioned, forgot to open the cover to take the reading and instead wrote the meter's serial number on the card.
Used to be that if you didn't pay the water bill they added to your town taxes. I guess enough people did just that and it was causing a cash flow issue with the water authority. Now they charge you a $25 late fee each time you don't pay a quarterly bill. They'll still add the bill to your taxes, but it'll cost you extra, as much as an extra $100 per year.
The "upside" of them adding it to your taxes is that it shows up in the total real estate taxes paid, so a not-so-honest person could claim it on their tax form, thereby not paying income tax on the amount they spent on water.
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