I dont want insulation in home

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I want to build a cabin on my property. Actually a small house. The problems is that I dont want insulation. I love the rough look of studs and the exterior plywood sheathing. Not only that, but I'm allergic to fiberglass and dont want plastics such as foam which are very environmentally bad, as well as flammable. I have no intention of using sheetrock or other interior wall coverings. I want the inside to look just like a hunting lodge, but for full time use year around.
This leaves me wondering how to build it. I now have a shed built from 2x4s and covered with treated plywood on the exterior. When I built it, I put silicone caulk on every plywood joint, then applied 1x4's over the joints. I later painted the whole shed and it looks great on the outside. I've grown to really like that rough look on the inside. Everyone has plaster or sheetrock in their house, and it's monotonous.
Actually with all the joints caulked, that shed is relatively easy to heat, but I'm sure with some sort of insulation it would be better in the extreme cold weather we get in winter.
What can I do to insulate ot from the outside? Presently I've thought of covering the exterior walls with 1/4" plywood, then applying some sort of insulation (not sure what), then covering that with 1/2" plywood and painting it. I intend to use steel on the roof, so there again, the insulation needs to be under the steel on top of the plywood roof.
Note: I dont want ugly plastic siding, or for that matter, anything plastic, including the windows. Windows will be either wood or aluminum. I also dont want any particle board in the building. Plywood costs more, but it's far more long lived.
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snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Ever heard about log home? I think you ae BS'ing.

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Yep, I lived in one years ago that I rented.
Building from actual logs is way too much work at my age, and they are not as air tight as other construction. Those real wood manufactured logs as well as the tongue and groove half logs are way too expensive, and still leave an interior in need of insulation. Plywood with caulking in the joints is about as air tight as on can build, as long as the sheets are tight together. Besides I already have most of the wall studs, which I recycled.
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On Fri, 23 Nov 2012 22:02:14 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

sheathing between the outer studs.
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And, if you don't like rock wool, blow in cellulose insulation (shredded newspaper treated with borax). It's got a high "R" value, relatively cheap and better than fiberglass for retarding flame spread. Bugs/other critters don't like it for bedding or eating.
Tomsic
Tomsic
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The borax content is not usually enough to keep rodents away. They sell cellulose with an extra high borax content for that purpose.
We usually rent out a summer cottage with bare interior. I think it was stained. Looks cool, but you can see some air gaps.
Greg
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wrote:

I'll definately look for the extra high stuff in that case, if this insulation is what I use. Mice are a big problem in my area, and I cant stand hearing them in the walls.

At least someone understands why I like that look. It all started when I built my tool shed, and I loved the look. There wont be any air gaps when I build it. There are none in my tool shed. Every joint gets a bead of silicone caulk. I mostly did it to keep water and insects out, but it also keeps the outdoor air out. I have thought about using a stain on the wood too.
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On Nov 24, 4:03am, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

You can get/use insulation made from wood wool/chip,. sheep's wool or shredded paper, recycled plastic, cork, hemp and a host of other stuff
Or you can in the UK anyway.
http://www.naturalinsulations.co.uk/?gclid=CPOYs4yI57MCFerItAodCHMAzg
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On Fri, 23 Nov 2012 23:20:10 -0800 (PST), harry

It does not matter. Unless the OP is building in a very moderate climate, he is nuts to even think about building with no insulation. He is also very misinformed about the properties of it.
If he is in a colder climate and a place where building permits are needed, he'd never get a certificate of occupancy anyway.
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I know how insulation works, but I also know that I dont want fiberglass since it's very irritating to my skin. Fiberglass also draws rodents. That is why I abandoned the trailer house I once lived in. I also do not want foam, which releases airborne chemicals and is deadly in a fire. This is a colder climate. In fact it's below freezing right now. This is a rural farm, the building I currently live in is actually a workshop with no insulation or plumbing. I'm not worried about inspections and permits. It's just another work shed as far as they are concerned. It's my land, I own it, and I dont let the government dictate where I lay my head at night.
So far the double studs seem to be the best idea, with the air space in between being the insulation space. But I'm open to other suggestions.
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On Nov 24, 12:44pm, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:
SNIP

Useful suggestions would depend on having some semblance of an understandable performance spec and the local climate...
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wrote:

I'm in the upper midwest of the USA, where it gets very cold in winter. If I was in the south, I would not even bother considering insulation. We have some hot days in summer, and this past summer had many, but I always cope with the heat, it's the cold that is a problem in winter.
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I'd want something in the walls. What did you think of my couple ideas?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I'm in the upper midwest of the USA, where it gets very cold in winter. If I was in the south, I would not even bother considering insulation. We have some hot days in summer, and this past summer had many, but I always cope with the heat, it's the cold that is a problem in winter.
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On Nov 24, 4:10pm, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Well...
you're halfway to half of "some semblance of an understandable performance spec and the local climate".. keep trying.
Hint: The better you describe the situation & your desired outcome, the better suggestions you'll get.
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I've had good results with blown in cellulose. I've used it a couple times, and it hasn't made me itch.
I used corrugated cardboard one time (free, and does have insullation value) in a friend's attic. He could tell the difference immediately, in the furnace run time. Might help in walls, also.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I know how insulation works, but I also know that I dont want fiberglass since it's very irritating to my skin. Fiberglass also draws rodents. That is why I abandoned the trailer house I once lived in. I also do not want foam, which releases airborne chemicals and is deadly in a fire. This is a colder climate. In fact it's below freezing right now. This is a rural farm, the building I currently live in is actually a workshop with no insulation or plumbing. I'm not worried about inspections and permits. It's just another work shed as far as they are concerned. It's my land, I own it, and I dont let the government dictate where I lay my head at night.
So far the double studs seem to be the best idea, with the air space in between being the insulation space. But I'm open to other suggestions.
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snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Do you not have sheeps wool available? Similar thermal values to glass wool, environmentally friendly and whilst it will burn, it will not sustain flame by itself.
--
Tim Watts Personal Blog: http://www.dionic.net/tim /

"It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent
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On 11/23/2012 10:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

I don't know if anyone has mentioned compressed straw. I seem to recall homes and such being built with the stuff. I find it very interesting. ^_^
http://www.structure1.com/html/strawbale.htm
http://www.toolbase.org/Technology-Inventory/Whole-House-Systems/strawboard-panels
http://tinyurl.com/c2f9cj
TDD
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On Sat, 24 Nov 2012 04:05:11 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Someone suggested that shreaded mewspaper soaked in borax. I know what it is, but isn't that only made for existing homes were a hole needs to be drilled in the wall between each stud? Also, dont mice still crawl in there? This will be new construction that I plan to do.
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It's not just for existing walls. A vapor barrier can form a wall for blowing. I think I've seen some self sticking form ? Cellulose is a bit better for limiting air movement compared to fiberglass.
I suppose mice could go through rigid foam too.
Greg
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On 11/24/2012 9:05 PM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

If I understand correctly from what I've read about compressed straw over the years, it has very good insulating properties and I doubt any critters can get through it. ^_^
TDD
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