I do not like water-saving washers

Page 2 of 3  


Considering that washing soda is an alkali, and vinegar is an acid... no, it won't do "just as good". You'll get sodium acetate, carbon dioxide, and water -- none of which is really worth a hoot as a cleaning agent except water, and you already have plenty of that.
Plain washing soda by itself will do about as well as the detergent. What made you think adding vinegar would be beneficial?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sure there is. Live someplace that doesn't have lizards.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 05 Sep 2014 17:35:15 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

The LG my wife just bought doesn't really latch closed unless it is running. There is also a "half catch" that holds it cracked open a bit to dry. I suppose there is somebody out there who might not look to see if there is a kid in there before they throw in a load but they are too dumb to reproduce anyway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 05 Sep 2014 19:04:43 -0400, Frank

Why would anyone dump a washing machine in their septic tank? This house had a separate dry well for the washer when I moved in but when I relocated it I just started dumping the water on the Banana trees behind the garage They love it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/5/2014 7:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Because I don't live in a trailer park.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Oh, I don't know -- vinegar works better for cleaning mildew off windows, etc. Just guessing.
Various responses.... thanks to all... good info in this thread!
This washer is a top loading water-saving POS. No agitator -- figure that out.... End up having to wash some things twice. Spins so hard it puts wrinkles in some clothes. Hope it never goes out of balance. Has no lint filter so (a) drain needs flushing out more than ever and (2) more lint is carried over into the dryer which means longer drying cycles.
Previous top loader was 1994 GE, plain old regular water. Had a lint filter, mini basket. Drain pump flowrate was slow enough for our small drain pipes. Lasted about 10 years then the transmission started leaking. Quote of $250 to repair would have been the smart thing to do. Instead now I have an extra large paperweight.
Yes, I leave the top open to air out.
I wouldn't recommend using glacial acetic acid. That's nasty stuff. Vinegar is strong enough for household cleaning. 1:4 bleach/water sounds good - I'll give it a try.
Some asian countries promote this type of low water top loading washer. Makes hardly any noise at all. I like the noisy version myself. US & Canadian made stuff (even if now made elsewhere) is always better made and lasts longer. That's my experience, anyway. OT, but I'm seeing "Made in China" printed on food more and more in the chain grocery stores. "Chinese quality control" means it was shipped without falling apart.
Heard more bad things about front loaders than top loaders. But, in my case, I would gladly swap my top loading dirty-in dirty-out model for a decent front loader.
<Begin OT>
On my comment about Calif wackies..... They are really not crazy -- they are in most cases cleverly manipulating the system to favor one company over another.
There's a bill in Sacramento to split Calif into 2 states. The new state would be called Jefferson. What's left of the old state would be named Mind-Numbing Stupidity.
<That's all folks>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Mixing chemicals by "just guessing", without knowing what the results will be, might not be the best idea you've had this week.
My junior high school shop teacher was disfigured for life when he "just guessed" that muriatic acid might be the next thing to try, after lye failed to open a clogged drain in the wood shop. He's lucky to still have his sight.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, September 5, 2014 10:37:55 PM UTC-4, Doug Miller wrote:

Could be worse. A math teacher at my HS got electrocuted. Something about using a shop vac to drain a pool while standing in it.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/6/2014 9:00 AM, trader_4 wrote:

drain a pool while standing in it.....

I thought that was for hair dryers in bath tub? Did he reversely install?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/6/2014 9:00 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Even worser (or should that be worserer?). Shop teacher at local HS cut a finger off. When he came back to school he showed some people how he did it. Yep, cut another one off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 05 Sep 2014 20:01:07 -0400, Frank

+1 on that
--
I kill-file all messages posted through Google Groups.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Why is dumping the washer water on the ground such a bad thing?
... and what the fuck would that have to do with a trailer park?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in

Don't feel bad. Someone has to live in a trailer park.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It was just a stupid comment. A trailer park is the least likely place where you could discharge the washer onto the ground. Trailers are usually less than 10 feet apart. I have about an acre of undeveloped ground around me and it is not an issue at all. In fact, it is water conservation. Why waste the water? Why contaminate your septic tank?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/6/14, 2:09 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

There was a septic tank here when my grandparents moved in, in 1925. My grandfather used it for bathroom water. Kitchen water went to its row of drain tiles. Laundry water went to another row.
Grease from the kitchen can mess up a drain field. So can lint from a washer. Putting that stuff elsewhere meant more air for bacteria in the toilet drain field to work and less to clog it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

My top loader, 35 years old, leaves the cotton/polyester feeling almost dry, and indeed it dries in 5 minutes or less in the dryer. In fact I have to include a towel or some knitted underwear to keep them from drying too fast and getting hotter than I want (which for some reason I think ruins the permanent press permanently. (Maybe the wrinkles are only temporary but so far I'm not taking chances.)
Otoh towels and knitted shirts and underwear certainly arent' dripping and I don't know if a faster spinner would get more water out of them.
I often watch the washer discharge hose in the sink to see how much water is coming out. When it's little enough I turn off the washer. If it's too much when the washer stops, I might put it back in the spin section of the cycle again, but that only happens when I've already fiddled with the times.
You know, you just reminded me. Another poster explained to me how to solve my sink-backing-up problem, for which I'm still grateful, by routing the washer drain straight to the drain pipe but 7 feet above the floor. I've told my 3 neighbors about that, but this is one big reason I don't want to do it myself, because I like to see what is coming out of the washer, how dirty the water is, if the spin section has done all it can.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here in Europe, front-loading washers have been the norm for a very long time already. The stink issues are real, but can greatly be remedied, or in most cases even totally avoided, by doing two things:
1) Always keep the washer's door at least a tiny little bit open when the appliance is not in use.
2) In case you rarely or never use the washer at its maximum temperature (which is 90°C on European washers and thus rarely needed), occasionally (say, once a month) run the washer without any clothes in it at maximum temperature. Use some normal detergent when doing this - special cleaners for that purpose are available, but rarely needed.
Greetings, Nils
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 7 Sep 2014 02:14:54 +0200, snipped-for-privacy@tisys.org (Nils Holland)

They used to be very popular in the U.S. about 60 years ago. I don't know why the fell out of favor. Now there is a resurgence, probably because of less water usage.
--
Web based forums are like subscribing to 10 different newspapers
and having to visit 10 different news stands to pickup each one.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/7/2014 7:40 AM, CRNG wrote:

My mother had an old Bendix front loader. I don't recall all the details, but it used to walk across the floor from vibration. Not sure how well it cleaned the clothes. It replaced an old Maytag wringer washer. That was back about 1950.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/07/14 08:51 am, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Oh yes. Now I remember that neighbors of ours in the UK had a Bendix front-loader 60+ years ago. I don't think I ever saw it in use, so I have no idea whether it went walkabout.
Perce
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.