I broke the handle off a ball valve. How to attach it???

I broke the handle off a ball valve. Darn hose got stuck on it, and broke off the threaded part. It's not a bolt, but rather the brass shaft had threads on it, and a nut above the handle. That threaded brass part broke off.
Normally I'd just replace it, it's just a $10 valve, but it's in galvanized steel pipe with no union nearby, so either I rip apart a lot of pipes, or saw it and thread or replace pipes. A job I'd rather avoid since the valve still works fine, the handle just wont stay on it.
The shaft has 2 flat spots, so the handle works fine. But I'd like to find a way to keep the handle on it.
I thought about drilling into that brass, and threading the hole, but there is not much material there, so I might end up drilling into the inside ball, and ruining the whole thing. My only other thought is to glue it on with JB Weld. But first I have to buy some, since I used up what I had before. That will probably be the way I do it, but thought I'd post this and see if anyone else has any suggestions. Sometimes there are some good suggestions on here!
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On Thursday, March 10, 2016 at 8:17:10 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

Determine the manufacturer and order a new stem. e.g.
http://www.cranecpe.com/images/dmImage/SourceImage/jenkins-ball-valves-features.jpg
I like JB Weld but I'm not sure it will work in this case.
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In wrote:

A side question:
I am just curious..., when I look at the exploded diagram of the ball valve (cool link, thanks), it doesn't look like the valve stem would come out through the top valve. I would assume that it must come out that way, but it looks too large in the diagram for that to work.
So, my question is, on a ball valve, if I take off the handle, packing nut, packing, etc., will the valve stem come out?
Again, I assume it will, but I am just wondering if that is correct.
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On 3/10/2016 8:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

I'd slip the handle on. Hit the shaft end in several places with a prick punch and hammer. Try to widen the shaft so it grabs inside the handle.
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How about using a small pair of Vise Grips for a handle? Sharkbite fittings and some sort of telescope instead of cutting and threading?
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On Fri, 11 Mar 2016 20:39:31 -0600, "Dean Hoffman"

Thanks, The vice grips is a possible solution.
I dont think they make Sharkbites for galvanized pipe, but I may be wrong. However, I wont use any of them. Not only are they over priced, but they can fail, and I know that for fact, after seeing it happen.
I'm not sure what you mean by "some sort of telescope" ????
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On Saturday, March 12, 2016 at 7:19:46 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

Is buying a new stem not an option?
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On Sat, 12 Mar 2016 04:30:39 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

I'm going to try to buy an identical valve, take it apart, and see if I can change the stem. I'm a bit puzzled whether the stem just sits on top of the ball, or is directly attached to it. Because if the ball has to come out, that means I have to take the plumbing apart anyhow, in which case I may as well just change the whole valve. Looking at that URL for a ball valve diagram, it sort of looks like the ball can stay, in which case I'll just change the stem. I wont even bother to try to find a replacement stem. It's only a $10 valve. But I have to wait till I get to the big city to see if they have one like it. The local (rural) small hardware store only has one (cheap looking) ball valve that is built differently, and is way over priced.
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On Sat, 12 Mar 2016 06:19:31 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

You are already usig something that "can fail" - it already has.
If you have galvanized pipe in your house, now might be a good time to start replacing it. It will in all likelihood need to be changed when the time comes to sell the house, or if you decide to change insurers.
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On Sat, 12 Mar 2016 14:40:04 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

You gotta be kidding..... Galvanized pipe is some of the most durable pipe made. I dont plan to sell the house, and if some insurer told me I'd have to replace my steel pipes, I'd quickly tell him he needs to change his job.... (and show him the door).
And this pipe is not in the house, it's in an underground concrete pit, where my well storage tank is located. I would not even consider any other type of pipe in that location. My entire farm is fed from this pipe.
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On Saturday, March 12, 2016 at 3:45:49 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrot e:

water flow decreases over time because of rusting from the inside..
till you have no flow, about that time it will begin leaking at all fitting s.
if your current homeowners insurance company is sold, gets too expensive or finds out you have this plumbing, bad sidewalks, a fire, or other loss the y will require these lines be replaced, bad sidewalks replaced, porches be repaired, new roof, upgrade to circuit breakers, replace all knob and tube wiring. etc etc. heck someone visting trips and you will be getting a visit by the homeowners insurance company inspection service
PEX is so easy to work with, and cheap,
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On Sat, 12 Mar 2016 14:45:31 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

In your application you are ok - but virtually all home insurers will give you a REAL hard time about any galvanized water pipe inside a home - as well as cast iron sewer stacks.
Why? because water damage claims constitute a very large majority of damage clains to houses - MUCH higher than fire damage - and contrary to what you may believe, insurance companies are not in the "risk taking" business. They are in the "risk controlling" business - and one of the easiest ways to control the risk of water damage in a home is to refuse to insure homes with what have proven to be the highest risk features. Among those - high on the list - are galvanized water pipe and cast iron sewer pipes.
Most will not stop covering you if you are already insured with them, but most will also either not take you on as a new customer or will add a significant surcharge to your premium to insure you.
Same if your roof is older than so old, you have knob and tube wiring, you heat primarilly with wood, or you have aluminum wiring that has not recently had an inspection assuring it is in good condition and has not been "butchered" when modifications.additions have been made.
Up here (ontario Canada) you won't get insutance on a house with a 60 amp service either. 100amp os the minimum required - and whether you have aluminum or knob and tube or not, many companies are requiring an electrical inspection as a condition of insurance on any building over a certain age (I believe most with this condition put the limit around 40 years) and if circuits are found to be overloaded, or panels undersized, you will be required to replace the panel and rewire the overloaded circuits. You will also be required to install GFCI protection where required by current code.
I just went through all this with my 44 year old house to change insurers. What I save on insurance from the change will pay for the (expensive) panel replacement and inspections required in as little as 5 years.
from the canadian underwriters.ca website :
Water damage accounts for approximately 40% of all home insurance claims, according to data released Tuesday from Aviva Canada Inc.
Water
The average cost of water damage claims rose 117% over 10 years, from $71,92 in 2002 to more than $15,500 in 2012, the insurer says. Aviva Canada paid out more than $111 million in property water damage claims in 2012 alone.
British Columbia has seen the highest increase in average cost of water damage claims at 154%, followed closely by Ontario at 136%, Alberta at 109% and Newfoundland and Labrador at 107%.
Rounding out the provincial breakdown for the 10-year period, is Quebec with an 84% increase, Nova Scotia with 61% and New Brunswick at 50%. Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Prince Edward Island and the territories saw only a small number of claims and therefore were not broken out in the data provided by Aviva Canada.
In the USA: National statistics for Insurance Claims relating to water damage claims – show that the average amount needed to repair water leaks can be over $20,000.
According to The American Insurance Association water leaks in homes results in property loss amounting to over $10 billion.
Water Damage Claims account for approximately 23% of ALL Home Owners Insurance property losses suffered by homeowners.
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Something like this: <(Amazon.com product link shortened)> or http://alturl.com/597kg Maybe a slip coupling would save some work also. It's a coupler that slides over the pipe. It slides over the two pieces then is tightened. There are compression fittings at each end of the coupler.
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On 03/11/2016 08:39 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
[snip]

I had a similar situation. That's what I did. It was supposed to be temporary, but it worked so well it's been that way for about 8 years now.
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On Saturday, March 12, 2016 at 5:36:51 PM UTC-5, Mark Lloyd wrote:

I tend to live by the famous saying:
"It's only temporary...unless it works."
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In typed:

Just guessing here, but I think that many types of glue will probably work for what you want to do. If the flat parts in the handle slot fit fairly snugly on the remaining stem, then I think many types of glue would just hold it in place. The actual force or torque on the parts would be between the two metal pieces and not on the glue itself, and I think the glue would just keep the handle in place. So, maybe JB Weld, Super Glue, Duco Cement, etc. would work and would be worth a try.
Or, for the few times that you would need to operate the valve, maybe just tie a string around the handle and hang it on the pipe or valve so it will always be there when you need it to open or close the valve.
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