I bought a Moto G from Motorola, and it doesn't come with a CHARGER!

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On Tue, 4 Feb 2014, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

More devices are coming this way. My four year old Sansa Fuze just came with a cable, no AC adapter. When I got a Kobo Mini ebook reader last year, it only came with a cable.
But you don't need to spend much. When I got a used TomTom One GPS receiver at a Rotary Club garage sale last June, I immediately picked up a couple of suitable AC adapters at garage sales, one for 25cents, one for fifty cents. The fact that they are now standardizing on a USB type connector does make it simpler. No need to dig through the box of adapters to find one that has the right voltage, and then chances are good the connector is the wrong size and/or the polarity is wrong for the device. I already had some suitable USB type ac adapters from finding in th garbage, but it was easier to buy those that day than dig through the box.
Maybe people won't even need to buy at 50cent level, they can ask family or friends if they have any lying around (and they may).
Michael
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On Tue, 04 Feb 2014 17:28:30 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Hi Jeff, I myself recently purchased the Moto G, so this is useful information.
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5541/12344729295_b954a7ec30_o.gif
In point of fact, I read with interest everything you post, and after reading your reference, one sentence struck me as particularly useful with respect to what comes with the Moto G by default: "A common EPS must include a cable with a Micro USB-B connector for connecting to a mobile phone."
So, *that* explains why the Motorola Google Moto-G, which we know does not come with a charger, at least comes with a USB cable!
PS: I've been clamoring for a common-charge standard since USB was invented! I never bought an earbud, phones, cameras, GPS, etc. that wasn't common (mini-USB in those days). People used to make fun of me, but, now they're reaping the benefits of the idea that we really don't need to have a separate charger format & connector for every device.
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On Thu, 6 Feb 2014 15:15:59 +0000 (UTC), Danny D'Amico

Your nightmare has only just begun. It's not quite a neat as it could have been. <http://blog.curioussystem.com/2010/08/the-dirty-truth-about-usb-device-charging/ <http://www.instructables.com/id/Modify-a-cheap-USB-charger-to-feed-an-iPod-iPhone/ Apple and the rest of the industry have gone separate ways in their methods of negotiating the proper charging current. The result is that you'll find chargers with two USB connectors, labeled Apple, and everyone else. Also note the 3.1A charging current: <http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item31119653295
Since Apple chose to release it's iPhone 5 with a non EU standard connector and charging system, one would have expected a reaction from the standards manufacturers in Brussels. Note that there is no law demanding that standard chargers be used. Well, it took about a year, but it finally arrived: <http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2297365/eu-announces-compulsory-common-charger-standard Yawn.
Apple... think different, very different: <https://www.google.com/search?q=apple+different&tbm=isch
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Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
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On Thu, 06 Feb 2014 07:59:10 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Hi Jeff, You picked an EXCELLENT article to read!
That article was interesting in that it explained the Chinese standard, the EU standard, and the Apple standard of USB charging circuits: http://blog.curioussystem.com/2010/08/the-dirty-truth-about-usb-device-charging/
It was interesting that apple used voltages for their charging circuitry: - low current: 2.8 volts across Data(+) - high current: 2.0 volts across Data(-)
While the Chinese used shorts, and the EU used a resistor.
The five 1/8 watt resistor "hybrid" circuit in that article nicely explains how a charger can work *either* for Apple (voltage) & EU (resistance) & Chinese (short) charge circuits; but not all three at the same time!
:(
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On Thu, 06 Feb 2014 07:59:10 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Hi Jeff,
While I abhor needlessly-multi-page howto articles, I read your reference: http://instructables.com/id/Modify-a-cheap-USB-charger-to-feed-an-iPod-iPhone
What I learned was, for the Apple USB charging standard: a) 2.0 V on D+ and 2.0 V on D- puts out 500 mA on the power pins b) 2.0 V on D+ and 2.8 V on D- puts out 1 A on the power pins
It was also interesting that the author chose 220 Ohm & 330 Ohm resistors because the ratio is what matters, more so than the resistance itself.
What I learned from this is to make sure that I buy a charger that is to the EU or Chinese standard, and not to the Apple standard.
Also, I realized, from this article, that I *probably* could convert my dual port chargers from having one port at 1.0 A and another at 2.1 A, to both ports being at 2.1A, but, that's just a hunch at this point.
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On Thu, 06 Feb 2014 07:59:10 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

I couldn't figure out what the "N/A" meant, versus the "A" on that device, but, I do agree, 3.1 Amps on each port simultaneously is six amps of power (if it really can do that) out of a cigarette lighter socket!
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On Thu, 06 Feb 2014 17:26:56 +0000, Danny D'Amico wrote:

OOps. Six amps of current (not power!).
The power would be 6A x 5V = 30 Watts!
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I find it strange that the power points in my Escape are fused at 15A, and my lighter is on a 40A fuse! I kinda would have thought it would be the opposite.
--
SC Tom



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On Fri, 7 Feb 2014 09:09:15 -0500, SC Tom wrote:

Don't forget that the lighter is a short when you first press it in and the resistance rises as it heats up so it will take a large initial current which drops as it heats.
At 12v 30W is 2.5A and they wouldn't have any problem supplying that Danny. I'd expect them to be able to supply 8 amps depending on the quality of the plug and you can buy sockets rated at 20A.
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Ever seen a cancer stick lighter octopus connector? Something like this: <(Amazon.com product link shortened)> In order for that to work, you would need 3ea 15amp fuses, one in each plug, and a 45A fuse in the cancer stick lighter plug. If you reverse the situation, plugging two devices into the octopus connector will blow the 15a fuse.
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Well yes, but remember the original purpose of that socket. It takes considerable power to heat a coil to the bright orange glow to light a cigarette. And these days people like to plug in mini-fridges and whatnot, also inverters to run their mains voltage stuff in cars so probably the limits on power output have gone up if anything.
Quick googling says typically the fuse for the lighter is 10-20 A, so from the typical 14-ish volts (while engine is running) that's 140-280 watts.
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On Thu, 06 Feb 2014 07:59:10 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Hi Jeff, I read that article with interest: http://theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2297365/eu-announces-compulsory-common-charger-standard
One the one hand, you don't want government to stifle innovation with enforced standards; but on the other hand, are the non-conforming Apple chargers really innovative?
I suspect the "think different" part of the Apple non-standard chargers is merely an attempt to force unsuspecting users to buy specific hardware.
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On Tuesday, February 4, 2014 12:32:44 AM UTC-6, Cordell James wrote:

duh .. use the usb ;
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