I already had electrical outlets installed prior to sheetrock...

Page 1 of 2  
I have a major renovation going on and during framing, plumbing and electrical rough in I got sick of dragging a 100' extension cord everywhere and have to use those dim work lights after dark so I went ahead and install most of the outlets.
Now I am ready to do sheet rock I am wondering if I should remove the outlets so they don't get damaged during sheet rock installation or get rolled on later when I paint the walls...or should I just tape over them and peel the tape off later?
It will be some work to remove these outlets from the boxes and install them back later, we are talking about 72 outlets. I also wonder if I can just unscrew the outlets and stick them into the electrical box.
I will be hiring out for the sheet rock work, do they typically precut the wall board for the electrical cutouts? I think they have to since I already have the mud rings on, right?
Thanks,
MC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

'Round here, they put up the wallboard, then use a router to cut around the boxes. Ask the wallboard contractor whether there will be a problem before you do anything else. Be prepared to remove the outlets.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You should remove all the outlets except for a couple for the sheetrockers and other subs to use..Usually the one behind the fridg and one in a bedroom or laundry room on the other side of the house that isn't conspicuos is the norm..A PITA for you to remove them but you'll be glad you did..They shouldn't have been installed in the first place...Believe me....Saves a ton of time for the rocker , mudders and painters which will save you money cuz time IS money and they WILL charge extra...We do as most are paid by the sheet...Plus the safety factor for the workers...You will have a much better job as well...As for sheetrockers being the biggest slobs..You try to mud ceilings without getting mud on the floor or mud in the boxes and get it done in a timely manner...That said , most all around here scrape and sweep the floor and clean out the boxes after sanding is done...We have a guy who drives the one ton rack truck around that picks up the scrap sheetrock and hauls it to the dump for the rockers and scrapes and sweeps the floor behind us tapers as well as delivering supplies..The tapers clean out the boxes....I'm sure there are hacks that don't but you get what you pay for as in all things....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Feb 22, 12:20�am, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

They can router around the box. Shouldn't be a problem. My only advice is to mark the location of each outlet on the floor because sometimes they'll sheetrock over them and forget to rout them out.
Hank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How can they sheet rock over them and not notice if I already have the mud ring on them? The mud ring takes them to finished floor surface so the sheet rock would protrude out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mud ring on them? The mud ring takes them to finished floor surface so the sheet rock would protrude out.
********************************************************
Ever watch some of these guys work?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Some of the rock teams I've seen are the biggest slobs in any of the trades. Huge gobs of mud all over the floors. Boxes completely filled with mud. Breaker boxes splattered to the point that wires have to be dug out with a screwdriver. Floors not even swept when they leave. Rock scraps thrown out windows and doors into rain and puddles. The list goes on...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1D1OT wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Barker wrote:

In boom times, when the GC has to scramble for crews to meet a schedule, they can maybe get away with that. In leaner times, a GC can afford to be picky. If a sub does slob work and doesn't clean up after themselves, they don't get invited back. In smaller towns, word-of-mouth spreads fast. Better to pay a little more for quality work, and not have to do a lot of rework and cleanup before the next trade can get in there.
-- aem, who as a kid was the one sent in to do cleanup, sends...
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I replaced the carpet in my house I couldnt believe how much drywall crud was underneath the carpet. This explained some of the lumps I felt.
On the other hand when we pulled up the carpet in my in laws home not only was the concrete floor clean, it was sealed. It looked like a newly painted garage floor.
Jimmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JIMMIE wrote:

half-moon-on-a-stick scraper things those 2-3 summers in high school....
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Seriously, a good crew that is used to working together is awesome to watch. They make it look so damn easy. Then, when a tiny job comes up and you think, 'Oh, I can knock that out myself in no time', and it ends up taking all day and still looks like crap, you feel all the stupider.
I have lots of skills and talents. Hanging (and especially mudding) rock is not among them. I have the knowledge in my head, but the hands Just Don't Get It.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you don't believe me, take them all out. I was just telling you that it CAN be done by people who KNOW what they are doing.
Hank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Please disregard any of my previous posts on this subject. I was confusing the mud ring with something else.
I apologize.
Hank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 22 Feb 2009 02:03:42 -0800 (PST), "Hustlin' Hank"

The first owner of my house sheetrocked over the phone jack, and I've never been able to find it. He was from New Orleans and cold all the time in Baltimore, and he put another layer of walls on both outside walls of the big bedroom, as well as the back of the closet that abuts the townhouse next door. One two walls, I think, he used sheetrock, and on the rearwall cork and then sheetrock.
I even called the builder and bought a set of blueprints. He was very cooperative, and the prints weren't expensive imo.) That was before I knew that the blueprints didn't show phone lines, and weren't even guaranteed to be exactly right on electrical outlets or other small things. But I"m happy I have them. still worth the money.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It'll be a pita for them to install the rock with the outlets there, and they won't fit completely into the boxes. I'd remove them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

*Many years ago I would put the outlets on and tucked them inside of the box when I roughed-in a room and it was okay because the drywallers measured and precut the drywall before hanging. Now they slam the drywall up against the box and use a RotoZip to cut out the hole using the box as a guide. The last time I put a switch on so the crew could have lights on while working they removed it. Now I leave everything off until the walls are painted. I suggest that you remove the outlets and tuck the wires into the box to reduce the possibility of them getting cut by the RotoZip.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Grabowski wrote:

i agree, there's no way they're gonna be able to rotozip them with the outlets in place. And i can't imagine a company precutting by measurement. even if they did, you'd still have to unscrew the outlets and stuff them in the box, and they'd still stick out a bit. Just remove them.
s
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Feb 21, 9:20pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

1. Normally, mud rings are not used for new work, the box is installed either 1/2" or 5/8" protruding - they even have 'dimples' on them for 1/2" out spacing.
2. The 'rockers cannot rotozip with either mud rings or outlets in place.
3. You will be paying extra if you do not remove at least the outlets and probably anyhow due to themudrings.
Harry K
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

1. Normally, mud rings are not used for new work, the box is installed either 1/2" or 5/8" protruding - they even have 'dimples' on them for 1/2" out spacing.
When would they be used? It sure isn't for old work. They're used anytime you want or need a large box. I routinely use them for any outlet location that has more than two cables and all kitchen outlet wiring
2. The 'rockers cannot rotozip with either mud rings or outlets in place.
3. You will be paying extra if you do not remove at least the outlets and probably anyhow due to themudrings.
Harry K
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.