HVAC DIY

Page 2 of 2  

On Dec 17, 3:05pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I understand this. Ideally you would have lower registers for heating and upper registers for cooling. I will talk to HVAC pro but I still want to see what generally accepted solution to locating register is. From space perspective I want them all to be high close to ceiling. Right now several of my existing registers are blocked by furniture.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Commonly these days they are located where it makes it easiest to connect them. Ceiling for attic systems and floor for garage/basement systems.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 17 Dec 2009 11:25:14 -0800, jamesgangnc wrote:

I'm always surprised that even works - it means really long runs, going through cold attic space, only to have warm air come out at ceiling level, right where it's least useful for heating the room.
cheers
Jules
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 17 Dec 2009 11:02:20 -0800, ls02 wrote:

Yes, that's the problem I have in our place - no upstairs ducted heat (just electric baseboard), and it'd be hard to get anything up there due to the layout and wall thickness. All the upstairs rooms have two windows, too, so I'd really need two registers per room.
I'm thinking water-filled rads would be a *lot* easier - I should be able to run plastic pipe without disturbing the floors too much Only downside is that I need quite a few pipe runs at right-angles to the floor joists, and I don't like drilling holes in critical structures :-)
cheers
Jules
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One possibility is to do the plumbing runs on the wall surfaces, and hide them behind a kind of cove or crown molding -- basically just a 45 deg slat of wood at the baseboard, or ceiling, or where two walls meet vertically. Aesthetically, cosmetically, these 45 deg ditties could actually be a plus, if done right.
And, it would make the runs easier to do.
That still leaves the A/C, tho -- unless someone figgers out how to do a hot water/chilled water system economically. If I went through the trouble to run hot water (which doesn't seem like all that much trouble, compared to ducting,esp. considering the results), I'd proly go the whole way, and avoid A/C ducting, via mini-splits.
Another idea, if going the ducting route, is to install both high AND low registers, that are switchable, for heat, A/C. TOH or hgtv showed this pneumatic ditty, where full zoning is achieved via pneumatic air bags in each register -- which can also be retrofitted, btw. I posted a link to the company that did this a while ago, don't have it offhand. Very inneresting, tho, to see them snake bitty plastic pneumatic lines thru the ductwork, registers..
Imo, however, ducting is inherently "sloppy", energy-wise, unless one goes through phenomenal effort to make sure everything is air-tight, insulated, etc.
--
EA

>
> cheers
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 19 Dec 2009 10:33:02 -0500, Existential Angst wrote:

interesting idea... in fact I've seen a lot of houses back in the UK where they just run the pipes on the walls and don't cover them at all. Looks a bit messy, though.
Last place I had in England had 10mm microbore for the radiator pipework (which is what, 3/8"-ish) and that worked just fine - but I've not investigated in the US yet to see if I can get fittings to do something like that here. That'd mean trim for the rooms would only stand about 1/2" from the wall, which could easily work (subject to something interesting having to happen at the corners)

Yeah, thankfully that's not a problem I've got up here in MN; even in mid-summer heat, just opening the windows and/or using a fan gets enough airflow, so I don't need to worry about fitting AC.

That's a really neat idea. I was (idly, not seriously considering doing it) wondering a while ago how I could motorise registers, but that approach is far more sensible...

Yeah, seems that way to me. I'm not sure why the US still uses so much of it, except maybe just industry inertia. Maybe it'll change and we'll see more and more hot water systems around in the next few years...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes I bet it is messy but only that poor efficiency and is OK if don't get to cold in the area where they use that system, but? I guess it is lot cheaper. Now if that is embedded into floor that would be different story.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Heh, exposed plumbing is a bit of a retro-rage in some high-end bathrooms, NYC/Greewich Village/SoHo type stuff.. Chromed, of course.

So 1/2 copper (do they make a 3/8 copper?? I think they do -- I've got oddball smallish fitting) would do just fine, then.
And think Wire-Mold for office-type surface wiring -- in that office beige/brown. Not really my style, but perhaps something analogous could be done with the whole baseboard system, a very slight tasteful "boxing out". Or, a bottom cove.

Well, check out http://www.cleanairsystemsinc.net/dampers.html?pmc=Y&ysmwa=p-_NzE6mtkmjrp50Dmn9L_fECUyHMTaM-z2O2ApJ2ONSoe2MKuOrbQFrS4vlkqWm , about 2/3 down, "parallel blade zone damper" and http://www.cinemabuilder.com/products/HVAC/hvac.asp . Grainger's has motorized dampers, but larger area, larger price.
I'm looking into one of the above for a drafty kitchen vent.

Proly cuz it half-assedly kills two birds with one stone -- heat and A/C. I'm hoping someone figgers out a nifty residential hot water/chilled water system, altho that would proly be only for new construction. The condensate handling would be a bear for retrofitting. But mebbe someone can figger that out as well.
--
EA

>
>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, flex has more resistance. Yes, you can insulate metal ducts. I've done it.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 16 Dec 2009 12:18:03 -0800, ls02 wrote:

Yeah, they are - but I bought a couple of runs of 6" duct from HD once (the rest I needed came from my local Restore place) and of the whole pile there I got the only good two that weren't badly damaged (and even then one of those was a real pain in the butt to snap together)
I think I prefer rectangular duct - it's a lot easier to work with, particularly if doing anything custom, and takes up less space (because for a given cross-sectional area a round duct takes up more useful space)
cheers
Jules
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 16 Dec 2009 08:57:27 -0800 (PST), jamesgangnc

Mini splits are expensive to install but the ability to zone the cooling may make your payback period pretty short. If you only run the rooms you use. I have a central system but we only run the mini in the bedroom when we go to bed. That way my wife can have the 70 she likes to sleep without cooling the whole house. I also have a mini in a new addition we only cool when people are sleeping over. It is open to the screen cage most of the time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depending on the length of the cooling season. But indeed, the zoning is Da Bomb. I don't know how much heat pumps save over oil or gas, but whatever savings there are would help as well during the heating season..
They are also easier on the wiring than a central air compressor, and would lower demand charges, if such exist for residences.
What brand/type did you install? Did you measure the power consumption?
I was going to do two 12K btu units, but the mitsubishi/fujitsu price came in at $5K for the pair, and it turned out that installation in these two particular locations was not quite the slam-dunk I thought it would be. So I passed on it for this year, will look at cheaper units, maybe that Amcoraire unit. I'm wary of internet stuff, tho.
--
EA



> If you only run the rooms you use. I have a central system but we only
> run the mini in the bedroom when we go to bed.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 16 Dec 2009 13:08:52 -0500, "Existential Angst"

One is an LG the other a no name clone of the LG (labeled Allstyle). They look pretty much the same to me. They are both 1 ton and seem to draw about 10-12a @ 120v. The thing I like is they will run on a garden variety 120v circuit so if your panel is getting filled up you only need one slot and that could be a piggyback breaker, so really zero new slots.
We are pretty much A/C only here so I didn't buy the heat pump option.
One I bought installed. I put in the other, no big deal but I have done some HVAC before. The bedroom machine is on the christmas light circuit, since they both ended up in the same place and are usually non-coincidental loads.. If I really see the need I can run another circuit out there pretty easily.,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Please be sure to consult with the HVAC installer. Some of them get very upset with home owners who are trying to save a buck. They like to do the whole package. Yours may not be as easily upsettable.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.