Hurricane Supply Kit

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If you can't get cell reception, move to high ground and you may be able to reach towers that are in working condition.
https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ui=2&ik=413208963f&view=pt&search=inbox&msg=13a94644a2ce0a93
Both the National Hurricane Center and the American Red Cross have developed specific guidelines for Hurricane supply kits. A hurricane survival kit is merely a specialized version of your disaster supply kit. It should include provisions to carry you through a week or two after a storm or other disaster. Our hurricane preparation page includes additional recommendations based on experiences of real people who have been through similar situations. Remember, the more water, food, and other items you have the better off you will be in the event of an emergency. http://www.hurricane.com / You will be able to assist family and friends if needed. https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ui=2&ik=413208963f&view=pt&search=sent&msg=13a8f0c7db62d312 Some companies include pre-assembled survival kits that include water purification tablets and more. They can be useful in addition to your own kit.
Our own version increases some of their recommendations and includes some additional items that are helpful in our experience.
Remember to print hard copy of any documents you need - instructions, tips or anything in case you have no power.
Water - at least 1 gallon daily per person for 7 to 10 days. Katrina and Wilma should have emphasized the importance of having sufficient water on hand. Don't forget some for your pets. Food - at least enough for 3 to 7 days non-perishable packaged or canned food / juices foods for infants or the elderly snack foods (Peanut butter; mixed PBJ; breakfast bars; crackers; canned fruit; raisins; chips; non-electric can opener cooking tools / fuel paper plates / plastic utensils / paper cups trash bags and duct tape - useful for clean-up, or patching leaks in an emergency An ax to use if you stay and need to escape from your house - or other uses Blankets / Pillows, etc. Clothing - seasonal / rain gear/ sturdy shoes First Aid Kit / Medicines / Prescription Drugs Special Items - for babies and the elderly Toiletries / Hygiene items / Moisture wipes Bug spray, Cortisone for bug bites Sunscreen & Lotion Tarp to cover holes if needed. Bleach Water purification tablets Waterless soap saves water for drinking Flashlight / Batteries Radio - Battery operated and NOAA weather radio Battery operated television, with extra batteries. Cash - Banks and ATMs may not be open or available for extended periods. Make sure you have small bills because it will often be difficult to get change, I you only have a $100 and water is $10 for a case and you are limited to one case, you do not want to have the choice of paying $100 or having no water. Keys to house, cars, boats etc Toys, Books and Games Important documents - in a waterproof container or watertight resealable plastic bag insurance, medical records, bank account numbers, Social Security card, etc. Don't forget your re-entry documents (e.g. stickers or passes). Many barrier islands require some documentation in order to return. Keep important phone number here. You may know them, but a loved one may not. Tools - keep a set with you during the storm. A pocket knife, nails, a hammer and rope are important elements. Towels and buckets are useful too if you develop a leak. Vehicle fuel tanks filled Pet care items proper identification / immunization records / medications ample supply of food and water a carrier or cage muzzle and leash Hurricane Tips If you can't get cell reception, move to high ground and you may be able to reach towers that are in working condition. Have a non-cordless plug in phone (a no-frills, phone that only plugs into the phone outlet and does not need its own power supply). Often phone lines will work, but without power, corldess phones will not work.
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Very good information. Hurricane kit tips, can be found on the web. With the one off the east coast, we may be in for one in a couple days. Government lists always neglect self defense weapons as an item. After Katrena, we saw violence, and illegal government gun confiscation. Citizens were endangered, both by criminals, and government. Citizens were also loaded onto cattle cars (busses), and shipped to concentration camps (Super Dome).
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
If you can't get cell reception, move to high ground and you may be able to reach towers that are in working condition.
https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ui=2&ikA3208963f&view=pt&search=inbox&msg a94644a2ce0a93
Both the National Hurricane Center and the American Red Cross have developed specific guidelines for Hurricane supply kits. A hurricane survival kit is merely a specialized version of your disaster supply kit. It should include provisions to carry you through a week or two after a storm or other disaster. Our hurricane preparation page includes additional recommendations based on experiences of real people who have been through similar situations. Remember, the more water, food, and other items you have the better off you will be in the event of an emergency. http://www.hurricane.com / You will be able to assist family and friends if needed. https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ui=2&ikA3208963f&view=pt&search=sent&msg a8f0c7db62d312Some companies include pre-assembled survival kits that include waterpurification tablets and more. They can be useful in addition to yourown kit.Our own version increases some of their recommendations and includessome additional items that are helpful in our experience.Remember to print hard copy of any documents you need - instructions,tips or anything in case you have no power.Water - at least 1 gallon daily per person for 7 to 10 days. Katrinaand Wilma should have emphasized the importance of having sufficientwater on hand. Don't forget some for your pets.Food - at least enough for 3 to 7 days non-perishable packaged or canned food / juices foods for infants or the elderly snack foods (Peanut butter; mixed PBJ; breakfast bars; crackers;canned fruit; raisins; chips; non-electric can opener cooking tools / fuel paper plates / plastic utensils / paper cups trash bags and duct tape - useful for clean-up, or patching leaks inan emergencyAn ax to use if you stay and need to escape from your house - or otherusesBlankets / Pillows, etc.Clothing - seasonal / rain gear/ sturdy shoesFirst Aid Kit / Medicines / Prescription DrugsSpecial Items - for babies and the elderlyToiletries / Hygiene items / Moisture wipesBug spray, Cortisone for bug bitesSunscreen & LotionTarp to cover holes if needed.BleachWater purification tabletsWaterless soap saves water for drinkingFlashlight / BatteriesRadio - Battery operated and NOAA weather radioBattery operated television, with extra batteries.Cash - Banks and ATMs may not be open or available for extendedperiods. Make sure you have small bills because it will often bedifficult to get change, I you only have a $100 and water is $10 for acase and you are limited to one case, you do not want to have thechoice of paying $100 or having no water.Keys to house, cars, boats etcToys, Books and GamesImportant documents - in a waterproof container or watertightresealable plastic bag insurance, medical records, bank account numbers, Social Securitycard, etc. Don't forget your re-entry documents (e.g. stickers orpasses). Many barrier islands require some documentation in order toreturn. Keep important phone number here. You may know them, but aloved one may not.Tools - keep a set with you during the storm. A pocket knife, nails, ahammer and rope are important elements. Towels and buckets are usefultoo if you develop a leak.Vehicle fuel tanks filledPet care items proper identification / immunization records / medications ample supply of food and water a carrier or cage muzzle and leashHurricane TipsIf you can't get cell reception, move to high ground and you may beable to reach towers that are in working condition.Have a non-cordless plug in phone (a no-frills, phone that only plugsinto the phone outlet and does not need its own power supply). Oftenphone lines will work, but without power, corldess phones will notwork.
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CRAIG ORAL SOMERFORD wrote:

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ui=2&ikA3208963f&view=pt&search=inbox&msg a94644a2ce0a93
https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ui=2&ikA3208963f&view=pt&search=sent&msg a8f0c7db62d312
Why, oh why, do virtually NONE of these disaster supply lists recommend a functioning firearm and ample ammunition? What the hell good is all that stuff if the goblins can simply take it away from you?
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On 10/24/2012 8:52 PM, HeyBub wrote:

Probably because the reality is that human beings have evolved to be cooperative with each other, and there have been very little instances of mob actions after a major disaster. It's the people who think they have to defend themselves from everyone else who are out of touch with reality. The rest of us pitch in and lend a hand, instead of curling up in fear hugging a gun.
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On 10/25/2012 2:57 PM, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

Here in Alabamastan we have tornadoes tear the place up every now and then. Last year after a devastating episode of TORNADO, folks started calling in to the local Conservative radio talk shows offering to help anyone who needed it. The good neighbors were all over it before FEMA even woke up. There were instances of looters stopped in their tracks by armed property owners. I suppose there are a few who haven't evolved enough to know right from wrong, like Liberal gun cootie fearing Democrats. ^_^
TDD
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NoLa after Katrina. LA '92 riots. NYC 2003 blackout.
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Yep. What I saw in our very diverse urban neighborhood after hurricane Ike a few years ago was friendly help, cooperation and neighborhood meals organized to make do while the power and water were off. How sad to live in fear from those around you when disaster strikes when help is more likely than violence.
Tomsic
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Glad to hear you have good neighbors. Me, well, I'm not sure.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Yep. What I saw in our very diverse urban neighborhood after hurricane Ike a few years ago was friendly help, cooperation and neighborhood meals organized to make do while the power and water were off. How sad to live in fear from those around you when disaster strikes when help is more likely than violence.
Tomsic
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Moe DeLoughan wrote:

Human beings have also evolved to do desperate things when they get hungry.
We gun owners do not curl up in fear hugging a gun. We set up defensive positions with overlapping fields of fire. Once that is done, we form reconnaissance teams, hunt down the marauding evil-doers, and establish cordon sanitaires around our communities.
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Oren wrote:

I'm in Houston and have been in at least six.
When our northern visitors hear of a hurricane entering the Gulf, they look down and say: "Feet! Make tracks!"
Most of us long-termers stock up on beer and strawberry Pop-Tarts.
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Blizzard parties here in the northeast. Love it.
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What does one stock for blizzard parties?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote:

Blizzard parties here in the northeast. Love it.
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On Thu, 25 Oct 2012 12:02:39 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Your-Own-Blizzard-or-McFlurry-at-Home
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Thomas wrote the following on 10/25/2012 11:51 AM (ET):

Might get both hurricane and blizzard next week.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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Lots of them, 3 where the eye was less than 20 miles away. (Charley more like 10 and we were on the Northeast side)
If you want to test your hurricane preparedness, turn off the main breaker in your house, the city water and gas if you have it. See how long you last before you really can't stand it any more and when you break down and turn it all back on, think about what would happen if it didn't come back on ... for a couple weeks. We had friends in Punta Gorda who were living in the 19th century for 2 months. That is what happens after a hurricane. The storm itself is a whole nother thing. Think, roofs flying off, stuff hitting your house at 90 MPH, trees falling, a foot or more of rain in a few hours and water coming up 10 feet higher than it normally is with white caps on top. If you are near the coast, that is a rolling surf on top of a 15-20 foot tide surge.
The only good thing is, in a few hours, the worst of that is over. Then the real survival exercise starts.
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We can learn from your experience, if you wish to share.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Lots of them, 3 where the eye was less than 20 miles away. (Charley more like 10 and we were on the Northeast side)
If you want to test your hurricane preparedness, turn off the main breaker in your house, the city water and gas if you have it. See how long you last before you really can't stand it any more and when you break down and turn it all back on, think about what would happen if it didn't come back on ... for a couple weeks. We had friends in Punta Gorda who were living in the 19th century for 2 months. That is what happens after a hurricane. The storm itself is a whole nother thing. Think, roofs flying off, stuff hitting your house at 90 MPH, trees falling, a foot or more of rain in a few hours and water coming up 10 feet higher than it normally is with white caps on top. If you are near the coast, that is a rolling surf on top of a 15-20 foot tide surge.
The only good thing is, in a few hours, the worst of that is over. Then the real survival exercise starts.
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On Thu, 25 Oct 2012 18:57:29 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
You know what you miss first, the washer/dryer. (assuming you have a decent survival kit)
If you can get the pool blue quickly, it certainly takes a lot of urgency out of the power failure. I ran my pool pump on the genny pretty early in our recovery, I am really looking at the solar pool pump as my first PV solar project.
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I remember one woman who posted about hurricane preps. She did mention laundry, get that all caught up. And make sure the kids are bathed, showered, and hair washed.
At least, generator will run for a while as long as you have fuel. Solar is good, if the sun shines.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
You know what you miss first, the washer/dryer. (assuming you have a decent survival kit)
If you can get the pool blue quickly, it certainly takes a lot of urgency out of the power failure. I ran my pool pump on the genny pretty early in our recovery, I am really looking at the solar pool pump as my first PV solar project.
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Keep up, Stormin. The solar panels these days will generate substantial power with just cloudy daylight. That's a good thing because that's what I have, mostly.
Tomsic
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Must be the technology is improving? That's good to hear.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Keep up, Stormin. The solar panels these days will generate substantial power with just cloudy daylight. That's a good thing because that's what I have, mostly.
Tomsic
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