Hurricane protection for new home? Garage door?

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[snip>>> How's about sharing which companies will write above the 250K and the

[snip]
For those who obtained federal flood insurance thru USAA, additional flood insurance over and above the federal program's $250K limit is available from Southwest Business Corporation, who can be reached at 866-387-9736. I haven't used it and don't know if other carriers have made the same arrangement. Regards -- JimR
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When the program came out it was announced that it pertains to houses east of I95. The below gives a slight explanation and when you apply, you'll be later told that you are not eligible at this point if you live west of I95. Call the Sun-Sentinel up and ask for the archived news document stating the above.
Congratulations! You are eligible to apply for a free home inspection in the program. Free inspections will first be done in selected (this is where they mean East of I95) hurricane-vulnerable areas where inspectors are available.
Please remember that applying for a free home inspection does not automatically qualify you for a grant.
Once you receive a free home inspection and you live in a high-risk area, you will be able to apply for a matching grant of up to $5,000 to do the recommended improvements outlined in your free inspection report.
In 1999 or 2000 the Feds gave money to Tallahassee to help with the hurricanes. This money was to be distributed to home owners East of I-95 to install hurricane shutters on their houses. Home owners were to get up to 10000 dollars each for this. Your beloved governor, Jeb Bush changed the criteria from East of I-95 to East of A1A. The homes east of A1A run from 1 million to 40 million apiece. They really needed the free 10K. A few blocks away are homes that are worth 70 to 150K and could have used that money for shutters but they were excluded. Why? They were not rich and republicans. When you call the Sun-Sentinel for the stories abovie, ask them for this one too and you'll see what I mean.
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The article as in Sun Sentinal, Aug 16th. Read the whole article. Way down it states "east of I-95 in Broward and Palm Beach counties:
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/legislature/sfl-pfinspect16aug16,0,3753180.story?coll=sfla-news-legislature
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jerryl wrote:

Program is getting a lot of publicity here, far west of I95 - this is first I have seen mention of that limitation. But, gosh, by the time the details are known and the inspectors hired, November elections will have come and gone. Gotta have an inspection done first, and they have no inspectors. And gubernatorial hopeful, Tom Gallagher, just this week sent around an email about the program (passed on to me by local chapter of Red Cross). Living in coastal Florida, I would not be without hurricane shutters - two layers of glass with plastic film doesn't seem strong enough to withstand a roof tile or 4x4 going 100 mph! Of course, a 20 foot storm surge would make it all irrelevant :o)
One storm, whose name I can't recall, was 100 mi offshore. The storm surge put the ocean over our seawall, at least two feet higher than the highest tide I normally see. Another ?six feet would make my condo flood. Twenty feet would drown my upstairs neighbors. Forty foot waves on top of that?
My reasoning is that the largest glassed areas, along with garage doors, are the weakest link in strong exterior protection, so need most reinforcement. A small broken window would let in less wind, rain and debris, so I'm thinking it is a bit less concern. We have triple sliders on two sides - one movable panel and two fixed - so hur. wind would probably take them all out.
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I had enough of the hurricanes and the hypes by the TV news. I had enough of double digit increases in hurricane insurance. I had enough of not having power for a week at a time and I definitely had enough of the politicians in Florida not giving a damn. I was fortunate enough to sell my house on June 5th and I now live in a safe area, Asheville North Carolina.
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Art wrote:

The entrance to my attic is open and in the garage! I am caring more about the garage door protecting the house than the door itself :)
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Art wrote:

gar. door, other than it being the weakest part of the structure. A friend just had a new door put in which has steel braces which are put up for storms - they anchor into the floor and the top frame of the gar. door. You should cover your sliders, as they have greater potential to shatter and leave your home wide open.
On a dollar for dollar basis, I would buy hurricane shutters (which we have). MUCH more protection against flying trash cans and street signs. Under water in a storm surge, not much good :o) Worst storm we got was 70 mph wind, and that is all I ever want to see. Our atrium skylight, probably 500 lb, went flying. Hubby, a very, very strong guy, wrestled a wind-blown trash container (very heavy) and it took all of his strength to get it back and secured. Welcome to Florida. Looks like Ernesto might have me in his sights.
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You're not protecting the garage door. You're protecting the house if the garage door blows out. The resulting wind entering the main house will blow out the windows and possibly the roof. They have available a vertical bar that fits into a socket in the floor and is strapped to the door during a hurricane. If you don't have this, put a piece of plywood between your car bumper and the door and have someone guide you to just touch the door.
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On 27 Aug 2006 13:09:39 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I would be more concerned about the pressure in the house, actually, but yes cut ply for the sliders and store with the other stuff. We took a direct hit in 1960. we had one window partially open on the leeward [sic] side of the house supposedly to even out the inside pressure (kid then). We were lucky to still have a roof and a dozen refugees or so.
If a storm takes your roof and the garage is attached to the house, chances are you will get a new garage door also.
Follow local instructions.
Oren
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On Sun, 27 Aug 2006 13:09:39 -0700, twobearcatz wrote:

http://www.flash.org/resourceCenter.cfm
Might want to bookmark this.
This site has link with tips that will help with Hurricane or other disaster information. Waiting on Ernesto now. Tampa Bay area here.
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Check out http://www.securedoor.com .
Rich http://www.garagedoorsupply.com

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