Hurricane protection for new home? Garage door?

Page 1 of 2  
I'm in the process of "protecting" my Florida home against hurricane winds. This is a new home with a wood/stucco construction. I've been able to find anchors to put 3/8inch plywood on all the windows. I'm not sure how much protection this will offer, but it was the best I could do by myself. I've heard that the garage door is also a weak spot on the house. Does anyone know what kind of wind a new garage door can withstand? Mine is a (standard?) metal door with the reinforcing horizontal metal straps going all the way down. I've seen kits, and heard ideas from other on reinforcing the garage doors. Is this only worth it for old or really cheap garage doors? Also, what about the sliding patio doors? I didn't bother to cut boards and get anchors to try to protect it any further. I've been told the home has the standard "hurricane" glass installed on all new homes in Florida. In other words it is rated to withstand wind pressure. It is NOT shatter resistant. TIA for any help on this. Ironically, most people don't seem to know much about it in Florida!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Garage doors are not that expensive and probably not worth trying to protect. I would try to protect the sliding door to protect the inside of the house.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
--WebTV-Mail-15357-7572 Content-Type: Text/Plain; Charset=US-ASCII Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7Bit
The idea of the wood or shutters on windows is to protect the glass from shattering from flying objects. Therefore not lettng wind into the house and lifting your roof. Definetly protect that sliding glass door.Buy 4 x8 sheets of plywood and run them horizontally. Screw a 2 x 4 on each long side of the bottom piece and a 2x4 on the bottom of the top sheet.. Cut the top sheet at least 4 inches above the opening. The wood on the plywood is to preventit from buckling on the long span. Screw them in to the foundation cement block or whatever your house is made of. You might need a hamer drill if it is cement. Rent one. Don't get a Ryobi from the box stores.
They have some new fasteners out now where you screw it into the wall and then you attach a wing nut with washer on it. Home Depot carries them.
Your best bet and easier is the storm panels . You will get tired of putting up those darn panels every year. But it is a little late now for Ernesto. The track is screwed into the sill and top and all you do is remove panels and use them next year. and track stays in place. They even have one for your doors where the track folds down so you don't trip over it.There are a lot of other options too. After this storm is over.
I have doing this for 40 years with the wood. And been trying to get my son to install the storm panels. He is in the business and has been so busy. So I guess it is the wood again this year.
I never think of it on the off season. So I think that is what I want for xmas.
Pat
--WebTV-Mail-15357-7572 Content-Description: signature Content-Disposition: Inline Content-Type: Text/HTML; Charset=US-ASCII Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7Bit
<html><bodybgcolor="white"text="green"></body></html>
--WebTV-Mail-15357-7572--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Actually when the garage door fails the interior is greatly exposed.
Suggest the OP look at >>
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/features/home/sfl-hg03garagejun03,0,4188782.story?coll=sfla-features-homegarden
Also google "florida garage door" for other info
Art wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks all for the quick replies! After further investigation, it seems I *might* have what they call a "wind-loaded" door already installed. In this picture:
http://www.diygaragerepair.com/Hurricane-Proof-Your-Garage-Door-s/302.htm
they show a non-wind loaded door being bolstered by a metal reinforcement post that looks a lot like what I have going horizontally every 2 feet or so down my garage door. The metal and hinging structure on this door looks a lot tougher than some of the doors I used to see up North. My door does not look like the cheap one in the picture. It seems all doors installed in Florida post 2002 are supposed to meet this code? I found the entire owners manual for the door tucked under one of the supports ... but still haven't found a sticker indicating wind rating. Howard wrote:

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/features/home/sfl-hg03garagejun03,0,4188782.story?coll=sfla-features-homegarden
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

[snip]
If this is new construction (you said it was a new house) then it has to meet current codes, which include some level of protection against hurricanes. The level depends upon the county in which you live, with Miami-Dade being the most stringent. The company which built the house (if it's new) should already have given you details about the garage door specifications -- you can also consult with the door installation company or go directly to the manufacturer who can give you specifics.
If it's old construction, its level of protection will depend upon the year it was built, because the codes got stricter after the '91 hurricane and again after more recent events.
If it's old construction, your primary concern may be the roof, because of the unknown status of the roof shingles and structure. In the several hurricanes which have come through our area in the last two years, by far the most serious damage came from roof damage that let in water, or which then compromised the structure of the house.
You should probably IMMEDIATELY sign up for the "Safe Florida Home" initiative. This is $250M program which Gov Bush has signed, providing grants of up to $5,000 to homeowners to upgrade home safety. It's only been in existence for a week, and may already be oversubscribed. However, the very first item in the program is a free home inspection to identify areas where safety can be improved. You can sign up at www.mysafefloridahome.com. Regards --
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
--Also -- Make sure you have a separate flood insurance policy. It's already too late to get a new one and you'll have to wait until after Ernesto is no longer a threat -- Regards

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JimR wrote:

...snip

I live in Florida and recently looked into getting flood insurance because the lake at the back of my house sometimes overflows onto my lot (but not the neighboring lots). My agent told me that flood insurance will only kick in if the houses on both sides of you are affected by the "flood", so the insurance wouldn't benefit me. Bottom line: you need to know or be able to guess the flood pattern for your locale.
Jean
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
[snip]

I don't think that's accurate. Homeowners should look at their survey or check with their county building office, which can tell you precisely what flood zone you are in. You and your next door neighbor may not even be in the same flood zone if one of the two houses is built on a higher pad -- and the amount of your flood insurance premium will depend upon your precise flood zone. My one acre lakefront lot is charged a different premium than my next-door neighbor because of a difference in pad heights which creates a different flood zone designation.
The fact is that if there is a hurricane and you are flooded, your normal insurance will not reimburse for the flood damage -- only your flood insurance pays for that, regardless of what happened to your neighbors. Most mortgage holders will require that the homeowner carry flood insurance at certain levels of flood zones. For most in Florida, even on the Highlands Ridge, it's a good idea. Regards -- JimR
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JimR wrote:

Here's a quote from FloodSmart.gov (the official site of the federal flood insurance program):
Here's how "flood" is defined by the National Flood Insurance Program: "A general and temporary condition of partial or complete inundation of two or more acres of normally dry land area or of two or more properties (at least one of which is the policyholder's property) from:
* Overflow of inland or tidal waters; or * Unusual and rapid accumulation or runoff of surface waters from any source; or * Mudflow; or * Collapse or subsidence of land along the shore of a lake or similar body of water as a result of erosion or undermining caused by waves or currents of water exceeding anticipated cyclical levels that result in a flood as defined above."
Here's another quote from the FAQ's at the above web site:
Does the NFIP cover flood damage caused by hurricanes, rivers or tidal waters? Yes, providing that at least two adjacent properties in the area (or two acres) are flooded.
Bottom line: You won't get any payout from flood insurance unless the conditions mentioned above are met.
Jean
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

[snip]
[snip]
Jean -- the info from your agent may be out-of-date or incorrect. First of all, the "two adjacent properties" or two acres meant just that -- two properties, so that would have meant your property and one other abutting it. Secondly, the "adjacent" has been removed from the insurance contract, so now the only requirement for a flood is that it cover at least two acres or two properties, not necessarily adjacent to each other. The Floodsmart FAQ is out-of-date on that item. This information was confirmed by my flood coverage carrier. -- Regards, JimR
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
.

Only available for homeowneres EAST of I-95 and registered Republicans.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jerryl wrote:

Are you serious? I just applied! Not East of 95 or a registered Republican! :(
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK, that's a good joke.
The sad truth is that the program only applies to the insurance industry's customers, not to those of us who self-insure who are automatically ineligible. It is basically and insurance industry subsidy, not a homeowner program. Bah.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 27 Aug 2006 22:16:13 -0500, Richard J Kinch

Flood insurance is a federal liability.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And the Feds will only cover a maximum of 250K for the house and 100K contents at a current price of $317 per year.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You're not limited to the $250K, though. You can buy additional flood insurance, over and above the federal insurance up to your required limits, from commercial sources. My insurance company recently sent me information on how to purchase the additional flood insurance. Regards --
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How's about sharing which companies will write above the 250K and the premiums?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wish I could -- I threw away the information I received, which was from my insurance company but gave me the name of the commercial flood insurance source. If I get anything I'll post it -- Regards --
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks because I called my broker and he never heard of such coverage. Can you give me the name of your insurance company and I'll ask them direct?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.