Hunter ceiling fan supported by canopy?

I am installing a Hunter ceiling fan on a slanting ceiling in my bedroom. Following the instructions to the letter. Hung the fan and am trying to hook the canopy to the ceiling plate. I find that the hanger rod which hooks into the ceiling plate is longer than the depth of the canopy, so it will become unhooked when I secure the canopy.
This seems strange. It seemed to me the load of the fan would be borne by the hook and not by the canopy screws directly. Am I doing something wrong or are parts defective?
Please let me know if this is common with this or other branded fans, and is nothing to worry about.
Regards
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Rajesh Dugar wrote:

The hook is only there to hold it temporarily, while you wire the unit. You need to read the directions more closely! What holds the fan is the piece that that screws to that plate after you slip the triangle black roller unit in it first. You would probably be better off having a handyman or electrician install this unit. If you didnt install a special hanger bracket the fan will probably fall or shake to much to use it.
Rich
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Evodawg wrote:

The triangular roller is in place. And I have a ceiling bracket attached to a brace, to which the ceiling plate is attached. Is that the special hanger bracket you refer to?
The piece that screws onto the ceiling plate is the canopy which I am talking about. If the load is borne by the canopy and triangular roller, why are there particular instructions about the direction of the hook, if its temporary?
Thanks for the help
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Rajesh Dugar wrote:

Yes, special ceiling electrical box mount, which spans from joist to joist or attached directly to joist.

I have installed many Hunter Fans, this has been my experience with them:
You must first make sure the electrical box in the ceiling is sturdy enough to hold the fan, usually a stringer from the box spans the ceiling joists. The heavy plate mounts to the ceiling box, it usually has rubber vibration mounts that rest against the ceiling. The canopy mounts to this plate with three screws and a trim ring installed over the canopy which hides the screws. Before all this is installed you must place all the parts over the triangle shaft first with the fan motor in place. The hook in my experience is there to temporally holds the motor in place so you can wire the unit to the input wires coming from the ceiling box. Once you have it wired you take it off the hook and mount the canopy to the ceiling plate. The triangle mount allows the fan to swing or move a bit when the fan operates. It's basically a motor mount that fits into a pocket in the canopy. If this fan has a remote control then that remote fits under that canopy, which is a real pain in the butt getting it in there. But it will fit with some patience. Once the motor is installed then the light unit is ready to hook up and install with three screws. If remote is installed make sure the fan motor is switched to high speed. Install your light bulbs and test. You won't need to extend the pull chains if remote is used and you don't want to use the pull chains, it can cause problems with the remote.
Now there are some fans that a hook is part of the mount plate which this triangle mount fits into and holds the motor. This is usually another manufacture though. This mount type must be screwed to the ceiling box and secured against the ceiling.
I hope this has answered some of your questions. Its hard to explain without seeing your problem.
Rich
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