humidity in the house?

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I sort-of beat you to it in my previous post. I agree with you, but anything that cools the air, also increases the relative humidity, because it has less capacity to hold moisture.
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as I understand it, when the "seal" blows, you get condensation BETWEEN the panes of glass. I had this condition on a single pane downstairs. My condensation is on the INSIDE of the unit, not between the panes. I know that the windows are due for a change, but I'm in no hurry.... :) :)
b

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Does your humidistat read anything other than 60%, ever.
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The only way you can have 60% humidity in winter is with some very heavy humidification.
You have condensation on your windows because your windows are bad and so the insides of the windows are very cold, and this is acting like a dehumidifier and sucking out the last few drops of moisture. A dehumidifier on top of that? That's funny.
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I think not. A very tight house or a damp basement will do it.

Not necessarily.

Sounds natural, on a cold day.

Might be a good idea in wintertime. About 60% more efficient than electric resistance heat, as a latent heat pump...
Nick
Page 2 of
http://www.odpm.gov.uk/stellent/groups/odpm_buildreg/documents/page/odpm_breg_600356.pdf
mentions that a 1981 Canadian housing development holds the world record for low air leakage...
Page 5 says the voluntary Canadian IDEAS standard calls for less than 0.15 m^3/h of air leakage per square meter of house envelope with a 50 pascal blower door test, which is equivalent to about 0.15/20 = 0.0075 m^3/h or 0.0127 cfm/m^2 or 4 cfm of natural air leakage for a 2400 ft^2 two-story house :-)
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I agree that it's very hard to believe a std older home as the OP described would have 60% humidity with outside temps of 0 during the winter with forced air heat. Some small amount of condensation around windows is normal. I'd check the windows, as leaking drafts, etc will cause condensation. Further proof is that the dehumidifier didn't remove much water.
BTW, if you think a heat exchanger is too expensive, how expensive do you think it would be to implement the idea of just hooking an outside air intake up to the return air duct? The operating energy wasted will be huge.
Like just about everyone else, I have the opposite problem and have a humidifier installed on my forced air furnace. And it does a great job.
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I'm guessing this is a very tight house....definitely NO moisture issues in the basement, we use it as living space everyday.

Again, agreed.

goes to show you that not all older homes are bad :) actually its interesting. this house is approx 1300 sq. feet (for a total of 2600 sq feet of heated living space). I have the IDENTICAL furnace as I did in the previous home of 800 sq feet (total of 1600). My heating bills are LOWER here :) Same town, same gas company, same weather. Larger house, less bills = less leakage.
b
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On Wed, 02 Jun 2004 01:07:18 GMT, "Hamilton Audio"

Just in case, make sure the furnace is venting properly -- ie, make sure the chimney draws correctly and is not partly blocked. This can create a high moisture situation in a closed-up home (water is a by-product of combustion), not to mention a dangerous carbon monoxide hazard. It's probably not your problem, but worth a check.
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