Humidifier and vapor question

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In my three bedroom trailer, I've got a floor model humidifier. I have to feed it at least two gal of water d ay, to keep the indoor air comfortable. Maybe even more than that.
From my old fire science days, I remember that water vaporizes, and increases 1800 times volume.
That means I'm putting 3600 gal a day of vapor into my trailer. Some condenses on the inside of windows, but not two gal per day worth. I wonder where the rest of that vapor goes? I don't have any windows cranked open, and I'm not holding the door open all day.
Makes me wonder what I can do, to reduce the air and heat loss?
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Christopher A. Young
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On Wednesday, January 22, 2014 9:11:55 AM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I would think a lot of it is lost via air leakage. Cold, dry outside air makes it's way inside, replacing warm moist air. Where does combustion air for furnace, WH, etc come from? New furnaces typically use a vent pipe going outside, while old furnaces use the building air around the furnace. If it's condensing on the windows, the humidity is too high. The indoor humidity should be adjusted down as the outside temps drop. My furnace humidifier has an outside temp sensor to do that automatically.
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On 1/22/2014 6:11 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Think about all the air vents you have. Our triple-wide mfg. home, built 1981, has quite a few vents. Kitchen hood vent, two bathroom vents, cloths dryer vent. All the sinks have vents that suck air from behind the wall when the water is drained.
Then there are all the openings when plumbing is through the floor. I am sure there are others. Just look and think.
Paul
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On 1/22/2014 10:20 AM, Paul Drahn wrote:

Thank you, that gave me a bunch of ideas. I do have a clothes dryer hole in the floor, wonder if it's still there. The vent over the range, has cardboard stapled over it. Though, it could use some sheet plastic in addition, I'm sure. Plumbing poke throughs, I'd not even thought of that. There is still a "stack" flue pipe for the old furnace, I've got that blocked since I put in a 90 percenter. And the 90 percenter draws combustion air from under the trailer.
Plenty to think on.
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wrote:

On a calm day, no wind. Fill your trailer with helium. Walk around the outside with a helium detector. You'll be surprised at all the 'vents'.
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On 1/22/2014 11:40 AM, RobertMacy wrote:

Not sure about the helium detector. But, I do have a combustible gas detector, for my HVAC work. would natural gas be better, or propane?
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wrote:

Great idea! That way you can launch pieces out for everyone to examine. The 'physical' corrolary to posting.
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On Wed, 22 Jan 2014 11:56:44 -0500, Stormin Mormon

Either one, if lit, will solve your humidity problems and your frozen pipe worries - guaranteed!!
What you want is a smoke generator - then stand out side and watch where the smoke comes out. Coloured smoke would be more visible - red or yellow.
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On 1/22/2014 7:14 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Much like my hero Robin Williams, in the movie RV, chasing a couple racoons out with smoke bombs. Take that, you rascals!
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On 1/22/2014 10:56 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Keep dumbass cigaret smokers away and you will be safe as long as no pilot lights are lit. ^_^
TDD
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On 1/22/2014 10:56 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Rent an infrared camera so you can see all the heat links. ^_^
TDD
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On Wed, 22 Jan 2014 09:11:55 -0500, Stormin Mormon

It's your drafty redneck bungalow - the vapour and the heat both escape the same way. The cold extremely dry air that blows in through the cracks pushes the warm moist air out the other side.
You gotta get a couple of those "quebec garages" I mentioned the other day to seal the trailer into.
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On 1/22/2014 4:09 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That may be the least of your problems. I'm most comfortable with a dewpoint around 45F inside. If it's colder than 45F outside, that means that somewhere inside your walls, it's 45F. And a bunch of that 2 gallons a day is condensing there. I'd worry a lot about mold. Perhaps run an exhaust fan so that the leakage is coming in. Water won't condense out of air that's warming up.

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Get one of those infrared thermometers.
I'll bet you'll see a lot of leakage without adding gases to your environme nt.
The fact that you are adding moisture constantly proves you have a huge amo unt of infiltration (outside air coming in through gaps).
You'd be better off finding and sealing them, then you can add much less wa ter, maybe none.
When we lived in Germany, our house was so tight that with just normal wate r from breathing, cooking, and the occasional shower, the house would fill with mold if we didn't open windows twice a day. There is plenty of intern al humidity generation if you don't lose it all to a leaky house.
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On 1/22/2014 10:42 PM, TimR wrote:

I tried walking around with IR thermometer, and check various points. I probably don't have the technique right. What I found was that the outside skin of the trailer was all the same temp, and I couldn't find much variation indoors. Some power companies offer infrared thermographs, but I've not gone that far to call em out.
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On Thursday, January 23, 2014 7:37:08 AM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

onment.

amount of infiltration (outside air coming in through gaps).

s water, maybe none.

water from breathing, cooking, and the occasional shower, the house would f ill with mold if we didn't open windows twice a day. There is plenty of in ternal humidity generation if you don't lose it all to a leaky house.

In the old days you would get a roll of 35mm infrared film and shoot some p ics of the outside of your house on a cold day. I suppose there are infrar ed digital cameras these days.
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On 1/23/2014 10:21 AM, jamesgang wrote:

I didn't know that about the film. Neat idea. Yes, IR cameras exist, but serious expensive. I've heard some fire departments have them for finding hot spots in walls, and victims in situations. I doubt they would loan it to me.
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On Thu, 23 Jan 2014 16:26:03 -0500, Stormin Mormon

Any home inspector worth his spit has one.
If a home ispector does not have one he's a fraud.
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On 1/23/2014 5:37 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Judgemental, yet? Let he who hath not misspelled a word cast the first flame.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Thu, 23 Jan 2014 18:24:48 -0500, Stormin Mormon

A home inspector without an IR camera cannot tell you if there is moisture problems in a wall, settled or missing insulation, and a host of other problems that you are paying him to find - that YOU cannot find with the naked eye. And he cannot either.
Call it judgemental if you want - a home inspector without an IR camera can NOT do the job you are hiring him for, and calling himself a "home inspector" is stretching the truth. Definition of fraud.
I rest my case.
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