Huge wasp nest - help!

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most garden hoses will carry very hot water as long as the pressure is low.
like spraying water OK, using garden hose to replace a section of PEX as guaranteed mess
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On 7/13/2011 3:19 PM, Dennis M wrote:

everyone has a water heater and everywater heater has a hose connection on it.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
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But there is only about a gallon of *hot* water there on the bottom before it runs pretty cool because that's the end that the water is replenished in. [BTDT- trying to melt some ice dams]
Jim
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sounds pretty bold to me. Suppose you're nervous while doing it, and screw up, and the nest falls into the room, or something.
I think for $125 or a bit more you can buy a professional anti-bee suit. Maybe even $200.
Also consider that these Africanized bees keep moving further north. Suppose you get a nest of those sometime?
Not that I'm about to try this, but my father, out in West Texas, when there was a yellow-jacket nest up under the eves of the house, would get a long pole, wire some newspapers around the end, light 'em, and with big flame going would quickly stick it up under the next -- all the yellow-jackets would fall down to the ground, and he'd stomp them dead.
And he'd do that in the middle of the day -- no waiting til night or early morning.
David
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David Combs wrote the following:

How long did it take for the fire department to get there to put out the house fire? And you said my idea was bold. Maybe so, but at least it was not stupid. BTW, the message you responded to is a month old.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Jul 10, 7:22pm, snipped-for-privacy@dennism3.invalid (Dennis M) wrote:

That looks easy, they are sitting ducks all exposed like that. (When it is hard is when they make the hive under a mushroom vent or behind something). I'd use the raid wasp spray, take aim, shoot, soak the hell out of it until they start flying out then just run into the house. Then come back in an hour for another application. Then come back in an hour with the garden hose and a nozzle that will give a needle pressue stream (the cone type for cleaning driveways) to knock down the whole hive.
Contrary to another poster they DO come back to the same location, but maybe not the same actual nest. They re-use my Weber Grill every year to start nesting, every spring I have to evict them, but there I do it by simply grilling them with the cover closed :)
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A huge wasp nest has suddenly sprang up on the side of my house I don't regularly walk by...
http://web.blomand.net/~dennmac/waspnest.jpg
I did some poking around on the Web and most people recommend after dressing accordingly by covering as much of your body as possible, wait until very late in the evening when they're all in there and feeling sluggish, spray the nest with a 25' foaming jet spray, then retreat until the next day to scrape it off.
Alternatively, one fellow says if you can wait until October after the first frost the nest will be vacant and then you can remove it with no problem. I have no small kids running around but I do mow directly underneath it and I don't know if that would provoke them or not.
Any other tips on how to deal with these unwelcome houseguests?
Is that a hornets nest?
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Wait until after dark when it cools down. They'll be asleep. Then spray the heck out of it. And run! They may be sleepy but they are probably going to be pissed off. Alternatively, you could smoke them out. Hmmm, wait, that might be for honey bees and honey combs. Anyway, good luck and don't get stung!
Jill
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On 7/10/2011 8:22 PM, Dennis M wrote:

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Did any of you hear of a professional bug guy?
Oh my, yes it costs a couple of bucks.
But they guarantee their work...save yere ass some nasty stings. But then....
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On Mon, 18 Jul 2011 13:20:29 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Papa Pat) wrote:

You have a different idea of a "couple of bucks" than I do. They charged us around $200 to get rid of some carpenter bees a couple of years ago. They were pretty bad and I paid the Franklins because I had no time to mess with it.

You're afraid of a carpenter bee? Sheesh!
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