How would you set up two 50 gallon hot water heaters in series?

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On 3/21/2011 10:46 PM, Aaron FIsher wrote:

Long time since you were a teenager, huh? A long hot shower can feel real friendly sometimes.
--
aem sends...

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On Mon, 14 Mar 2011 18:49:47 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Even with series connection you can run kids shower off the first one and dishwasher off the second, etc. The first one heats to a preset safe temperature, and the second heats to a higher temperature, using only as much power as is required to raise the temperature that amount - and can deliver a whole lot of hot water without any significant drop in temperature.
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On Mon, 14 Mar 2011 20:45:22 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

What temp do you all keep your hot water at.
I like that mine is not hot enough to burn me, but it would probably wash the dishes better if it were hotter, and it would be easier to get the bathtub warm when it cooled off or I made it too cold.
So what temp do you all use?????????
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On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 00:25:28 -0700, Smitty Two

I missed it, I think. I think 140 is what the seller of the house told me. I have to find my thermometer.
Thanks.
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wrote:

I like mine at 145 minimum.
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On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 17:25:01 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Thanks. I'll try that too.
Old electric water heater had a hole in it to adjust the temp. New one has a solid metal plate and underneath that a biece of styrofoam filling the space. Have to remove both. A real pain, but I guess it saves heat.
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On 3/15/2011 1:23 AM, mm wrote:

Mine's about 145. Use less hot water the hotter it is. duh.
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Steve Barker
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On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 09:54:19 -0500, Steve Barker

I thought I posted alreay. I'll try 145 also. Thanks.
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On 15 mar, 09:05, "Stormin Mormon"

Wrong answer, it is not 1331 it is 1333. You forgot about you whining about it and me replying to you. ;oP
VD
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On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 02:23:08 -0400, mm wrote:

I have it set to 130 degrees for both tanks.
When it comes out in the kitchen, it's a bit too hot to touch, but, the upstairs bedroom and jacuzzi are just right (which from experience means it's about 100 to 105 degrees if I remember rightly).
There is also a recirculating system which runs frequently (about once an hour or so) to allow the water to be hot quickly.
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On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 09:05:00 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I had thoroughly searched and did not see the prior hot water heater in series question.
Did I miss it?
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On Mar 14, 8:45pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I fail to see how too in parallel are going to allow for a higher GPM. The GPM is going to be largely determined by the incoming pipe size and water pressure. After the water leaves the water heaters, it flow through the same pipes, so again the flow rate is going to be determined by those pipes, faucets, etc. Following that logic, I could just cut out a small section of 1" pipe in a water system, replace it with too parallel sections, and voila I'd have a higher flow rate. This would only be true if the eqpt being paralleled offered signficant flow restriction. Not the case with a water heater.

Not without replumbing the house he bought, which didn't seem to be the objective.

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There are different options. In series if you set them the same you will have lots of hot water. Downside is that the 2nd one won't actually run a lot and you will have the maximum costs to maintain the water at the set temp. Set the first one a little lower than the second. This gives you really rapid recovery if you use the entire first tank. Also evens out the running time and reduces the maintain temp costs. But this will redcue the amount of hw you can draw in a single go. Parallel doesn't really work well as you can not even the draw. Parallel works better if you dedicate each tank to specific fixtures and appliances. The most common is to have a second tank dedicated to a master bath that has a large tub or spa. Also insures that you (the master) have hw when the kids use all theirs up.
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I've never seen water heaters plumbed in series except for solar, where the first tank is hooked to the solar panels and preheats the water going into the second tank.
If somebody does plumb two regular heaters in series, is it best to have the first tank set at a lower temperature so it won't leak as much heat?
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On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 06:09:16 -0700, jamesgangnc wrote:

This seems reasonable.
I have both set around 130 degrees at the moment.
I'm not sure which you mean by the 'first' and 'second'. I'll assume the first is the closest to the cold water supply and the second is next in line.
Are you suggesting something like 100 degrees for the first tank and 130 for the second tank?
Bear in mind there is a little black hot-water recirculating pump, which I don't quite understand but it runs a lot (I can hear the humming).
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One will be more efficient if its Ng since the main heat loss is up the chimney, the uninsulated center. Research EF ratings, Energy Factor is the accepted rating for a water heaters efficency , Most ng WH are only 65% efficent. They range from 55- about 86 EF for tanks. 82-96 for tankless.
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On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 09:23:12 -0700, ransley wrote:

They both are fired off the same propane tank (not natural gas).
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On Tue, 22 Mar 2011 02:36:28 +0000 (UTC), Aaron FIsher

WH's in series are a standard for geothermal systems. The 1st WH gets the pump circulation from the geo unit and recovers the heat to raise the water temp. The temp is increased by about 25-40 degrees and the water goes to the 2nd WH where it is heated by elec, gas, propane, or solar to the final temp. There is no other heating elements energized on heater #1. My system utilizes this and has been quite effective and economical for 16 years.
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Aaron FIsher wrote:

One heater has less radiation loss than two. Volume goes up faster than surface area. If, by parallel, you mean split load, that's more about rationing hot water. Serial has more hot pipe to lose heat. If you tap off in the center, it gets more complicated. For long runs, you're still heating the water in the middle. Closer spigot means you get it faster, but for serial you're depleting both reservoirs. Typical electric water heater has two elements, but only one on at a time. No reason you couldn't run both elements if you had enough electricity available. BTUs are BTUs. The amount of water you can heat is independent of how many heating elements or tanks you have. It's all about the total electrical input. How much hot water you can have NOW is a function of total tank size.
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The most common application of series connected water heaters is a 5 gallon unit at point of use to provide hot water instantly, connected after the 40 gallon or whatever "main" heater which might be at the other end of the house. This saves water as you do not need to run the water through the pipes to get hot water, and you don't need a high powered heater at point of use, like the useless tankless systems.
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