How to unshrink all-leather work gloves (deerskin, goatskin, no cowhide)?

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I buy deerskin and goatskin leather gloves from the arc-welding shops to pull poison oak vines so I'm forced to wash the gloves after use.
Even though I buy XL (the largest size they have in the non-cowhide gloves), once it's washed (even in just cold water with air drying), they shrink so much, that I can barely fit them on my hands.
I actually doubt there is a solution - but - just in case, may I ask ...
Is there a way to un-shrink leather work gloves?
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Mel Knight wrote:

While still moist, tightly stuff with shredded newspaper or toilet paper, starting with the fingers. When dry, remove that.
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On Wed, 06 Apr 2011 23:58:14 +0200, Sjouke Burry wrote:

That, I think, is the best suggestion so far.
Of course, it's too late for this set of gloves - but in the future it will be tried.
Of course, given these arc-welding gloves are mid-wrist in length (far longer than your typical garden leather gloves), it will be a bear to get shredded newspaper into or out of the finger holes.
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Mel, I would consider getting some diameter of PEX type plastic pipe. This stuff is firm but flexible. Get one that works for your finger size (may require a larger size for the thumb). Just to try it out, shove the pieces of pipe into the fingers when sopping wet. This may not keep the fingers long enough, but should sure maintain the finger diameters.
If the thought works out, you could develop a hand form mounted on a board to stick the gloves on. This would allow hanging a weight on the cuffs to prevent the fingers from shortening.
--
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DanG
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On 4/10/2011 1:53 PM, DanG wrote:

Lordy. Go to HF, buy some of the gauntleted rubberized fabric gloves rated for HazMat cleanup, and get on with your life. Six months after OP passes away, or is too feeble to cut brush, that back 40 of his will be impassable again anyway.
Most of us have enough PITA outdoor chores to suck up more than our available time, without assigning ourselves Augean stables to clean like that. Toxic plants are Ma Nature's way of saying 'humans keep out'.
--
aem sends...

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Plan A.....I would start by wetting them, put dowels in the fingers approx. the same size as your fingers and a block in the palm until they dry.
Plan B.......go visit OJ Simpson for advise.
Hank
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On Wed, 06 Apr 2011 15:00:58 -0700, Hank wrote:

This is (in a way) what I'm trying.
I soaked them in motor oil and wore them for about a half hour, flexing like a muscle builder the whole time.
They're currently drying.
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An industrial supply house should have gloves more suitable to what you are doing. There are plastic coated types with metal reinforcements and many other unusual designs. Check McMaster and Grainger for possibilities.
Joe
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I soak mine in water for about an hour, then wear them until they are dry. Werks fer me.
Steve
Heart surgery pending? www.cabgbypasssurgery.com
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On 4/6/2011 5:31 PM, Mel Knight wrote:

I buy cheap $0.67 cotton gloves and throw them out when I'm done using them or they are dirty, not for poison ivy, but other stuff.
Poison ivy I just wash well with dishwashing detergent (the soap of choice has to cut oil/grease) *within* an hour or two and never have a problem.
Do a combination of the two and you may have a solution to getting poison ivy.
I offer this advice because I never had any good luck with unshrinking leather. Or I suppose you could take the leather gloves to a dry cleaner?
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On 4/7/2011 12:58 PM, Tony Miklos wrote:

Cotton gloves over single-use nitrile sounds like a good compromise for pulling poisonous weeds. I wouldn't throw them out after every use, but I would mark them with a sharpie and store them in a dedicated sealed container between uses. Only open the container when wearing the fresh nitrile, and seal the container before taking them off. That way, bare skin never touches the contaminated gloves. Note for casual readers- you never wash anything with poison or irritating plant oils in a washing machine used for regular clothing. Plastic bucket and garden hose, while wearing rubber gloves.
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On 4/7/2011 10:18 PM, aemeijers wrote:

I always wash clothing that contacted poison ivy in the washing machine and never had a problem. I think in my case the detergent washes the oily poison away.
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On Thu, 07 Apr 2011 23:09:19 -0400, Tony Miklos wrote:

I always wash my clothes right after working with this poison oak. The clothes come out splotched with black oils from the poison oak. It looks like I've been in a grease-gun fight. The gloves are stained black as if the kids put markers all over them. That's all the poison oak oils after they've oxidized in the wash.
This isn't little stuff. These vines are as thick as your wrist. Little cotton gloves are NOT going to cut it. I was hoping the leather would hold up. Gas welding gloves were nice and long but the cowhide was too thick. The arc welding gloves fit and worked perfectly.
The main problem is they shrink. I like the idea of 'dry cleaning' them. I wonder if I can buy dry-cleaning solvent at the hardware store.
What dry-cleaning solvent can I buy at the hardware store that will clean leather gloves of urushiol?
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Mel Knight wrote:

Tetrachloroethylene, AKA brake cleaner (Brakleen - red can). Unless you live in California, of course.
Otherwise, a good detergent removes the oil.
Jon
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On Fri, 08 Apr 2011 16:51:28 -0700, Jon Danniken wrote:

I would have to live in the Republik of Kalifornia!
There are no chlorocarbons on the shelves, I think.
Is there something else I can use (perhaps from the auto parts store or the hardware store)?
Here, for example, is a picture of all my experiments (all of which failed)!
http://www.ephotobay.com/image/poison-oak-gloves-shrunk.jpg
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On 4/8/2011 8:09 PM, Mel Knight wrote:

Holy crap, you really have a big project going on don't you?
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Mel Knight wrote:

I wonder if you could get it shipped....
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Jon
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On 04/08/11 17:09, Mel Knight wrote:

I've never heard of actually washing work gloves. If I were you I'd use the cheap leather-palm ones and just throw them away when they wear out -- and NEVER touch the outside with your fingers. My work gloves get big holes in the fingers (repairable with duct tape, of course) long before I'd consider washing them, but I'm not dealing with poison oak/ivy, either.
I've got some nice goatskin gardening gloves, but they're too good to use :-) I used to turn them inside out (like the rest of the dirtbags) and use them for motorcycle gloves.
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Cheers, Bev
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On Sat, 09 Apr 2011 19:59:10 -0700, The Real Bev wrote:

My motorcycle gloves are kangaroo.
What does turning goatskin gloves inside out actually do for you?
I'm curious.
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On 04/10/11 20:19, Mel Knight wrote:

Puts the seams on the outside and the smooth side on the indside. What you don't want in gloves for dirtriding is skin-abrading seams.
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