How to truck 1,000 gallons of potable water to a residence

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trader_4 wrote, on Fri, 27 Jun 2014 18:01:32 -0700:

The problem with the Hertz water tank trucks is that they only have 2,000 gallons, which (a) requires a class A license, and (b) they say they would never recommend you drink out of it because they're mostly used as sprayers at construction sites.
Hertz Equipment Rental 408-451-9320
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On Saturday, June 28, 2014 12:51:27 AM UTC-4, DannyD. wrote:

No one other than Hertz? I would think someone would rent potable water trucks. People do have to occasionally haul it around.
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trader_4 wrote, on Fri, 27 Jun 2014 18:01:32 -0700:

Everyone has 10,000 to 15,000 gallons of water storage on their property. It's the code (grandfathered and changed over time).
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trader_4 wrote, on Fri, 27 Jun 2014 18:01:32 -0700:

That's an interesting idea!
I will ask them tomorrow (or maybe Monday).
That's the kind of innovative suggestions I was hoping to find from the collective mind!
Thanks!
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On Saturday, June 28, 2014 12:52:56 AM UTC-4, DannyD. wrote:

Why do you take one of my replies and turn it into three when you reply? Going for the record # or posts this month?
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Which brings up another question: So how long before even the deeper wells run dry? I've read this is not just a drought-induced issue but that the water table in that area has been receding for decades due to groundwater pumping. There are also some interesting geological questions relating to whether an ever-smaller water table might have an effect on future earthquakes.
<<"When humans deplete groundwater," said Benoit, "the amount of mass or material in Earth's crust is reduced. That disrupts Earth's force balances, causing uplift of nearby mountains and reducing a force that helps keep the San Andreas fault from slipping." >>
http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id 1393
We've seen that fracking induces earthquakes, albeit small ones, but I think the jury's still out on what effect all the water-shifting that goes on in that part of the country will have in the long run.
It's important to remember that areas of lush vegetation have become deserts in very short geological timespans because of volcanic eruptions or other major events. You don't have to go very far inland in California to find plenty of deserts.
It won't be long before we start strapping huge engines on icebergs and steering them toward Califonia to keep the nation's agriculture center afloat. (-;
--
Bobby G.



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Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds wrote, on Fri, 27 Jun 2014 21:39:22 -0700:

The way it works here is that each homeowner has their own well, so, there wouldn't be any sharing of drilling costs.
I have two wells, for example. Neither one puts out more than a few gallons before shutting off lately.
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On Fri, 27 Jun 2014 19:18:56 -0400, Stormin Mormon

Note that it's not just the distance, it's the height. Danny is talking about 5 miles at 9% grade. Maybe the 5 miles isn't all on the grade, but it sounds like his 'hood may be 2000' above that closest muni water. It takes 1000 psi to raise water 2000'. Therefore it would not just be a matter of running pipe, it would also require new pumps -- either pipe to handle 1000 psi and a very hefty pump, or normal pipe and several stages of pumps.
Edward
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On 6/28/2014 2:05 AM, Edward Reid wrote:

does cause all kinds of problems, trying to get up hill.
Ideally if each HO brought home 10 gal of water with each trip to town. But, back to my experience with the family with bad well water. Few people have that mental capacity, even when she goes out and puts the jugs on their car seats.
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Oh, and if you use that 1000 gallon tank ... remember that unless it has internal baffles, it must be FULL while you are driving. Otherwise, the sloshing will turn your truck over or drag the tank off the truck. And this is a big problem since you are planning to empty it in several stages. You could try driving very slowly when it's not full, but given the kind of terrain you are talking about, I suspect that won't be enough.
Perhaps you can get a tank with baffles. I suspect that $500 won't buy it, but I could be wrong.
Or you could simply deliver each full load to just one resident. With the size tanks you are talking about, you'd have to do some planning, but it sounds feasible.
Edward
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On 6/28/2014 2:11 AM, Edward Reid wrote:

so delivery of complete load doesn't sound like a problem. Sloshing is a major problem when turning corners. Every now and again, a fire department flips a tanker, cause of the slosh baffle problem.
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Edward Reid wrote, on Sat, 28 Jun 2014 02:05:26 -0400:

This is an astute calculation. The municipal water supply is at about 300 to 600 feet elevation. The houses are all well above 2000 feet elevation.
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On 6/28/2014 2:43 AM, DannyD. wrote:

protection courses, I remember lift takes 0.434 PSI per foot of rise. Sounds like you're better off driving than pumping.
I paid 3.69 for cheap nolead yesterday, and it's more like 3.89 in some places, here (western NY), IIRC. I think California with the botique designer low smog fuels cost a pile more than NYS.
So, you'd best to budget a LOT for motor fuel on your project. Driving water uphill is not going to be the same as one frail gramma in a Prius. Might get dual 1,000 gal tanks, one white for potable water, other red for gasoline.
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Edward Reid wrote, on Sat, 28 Jun 2014 02:11:19 -0400:

This is interesting! And thought provoking!
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On Sat, 28 Jun 2014 05:47:33 +0000 (UTC), "DannyD."

After reading the (IMO many good) suggestions in this thread, it's beginning to look like a pretty complex problem.
I wonder how it affects property values?
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Why on earth would you need that much capacity?
If you have a well system that *normally* doesn't run dry, then why would you need so much storage capacity for potable water?
And how would you keep the tanks clean enough (and the water clean enough) to drink or cook with so much stored water?
What exactly is this water used for? Household stuff?

I thought the point of this whole thing was to rent a single water meter and an inexpensive transportation system to convey the water to multiple people. If a large truck + tank would cost 10 times as much as a smaller tank on a trailer pulled by your own PU, then maybe a few round trips to each person with the smaller tank would still end up costing less than dragging around the 5k gallon truck.
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wrote:

the only guy I knew who actually had to do this had a water tank in his pickup truck, not too large, and filled it up at work. No mileage costs. I assume he paid back his employer, or maybe the employer suggested it as a low cost fringe benefit.
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On 6/28/2014 9:40 AM, Pico Rico wrote:

And that sounds like excellent idea. I have a gut sense this is more of a retirement community. Danny,anyone in your area going to work every day like PR's friend?
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Any chance for a used fire department truck. Fair amount of water, already baffled for a little easier carry, you know they are built to go places and already have the pump on board.
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On Friday, June 27, 2014 2:16:36 PM UTC-7, DannyD. wrote:
<snip>

From the description of the problem (which apparently will be on-going and not getting better, it is time for that community to get together for a LID (local Improvement District) and run a pipeline those 5 miles for a permanent connection.
Cost of the 5 miles in equipment and pipe would soon amortize over the hauling, rental, etc. Right Of Way acquisition would be the deal breaker probably.
Harry K
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