How to truck 1,000 gallons of potable water to a residence

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Stormin Mormon wrote, on Fri, 08 Aug 2014 20:28:06 -0400:

I will tell her. Do you think it's only the INSIDE two that are double breakers? Or, do you think the OUTSIDE two were also tied together at one time?
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Stormin Mormon wrote, on Sat, 09 Aug 2014 16:08:22 -0400:

In addition to 120 volts still going through the motor, I would think that it would kind of get stuck since it only has half the voltage it wants, which, can't be good for the motor, right?
PS: The lady texted me she will be home tomorrow, so I won't be able to look at it until them. I'll also see if the next-door neighbor to her is still pumping gray turbid water out of the brand new 520 foot well (it was pumping onto the ground for a week).
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On 8/9/2014 7:30 PM, Danny D. wrote:

CY: With one breaker open, the motor "sees" zero volts, as the circuit is open. But a worker touching the wire feels 120 to ground.

CY: Bother, that would have been nice to have at least one good well in your area.
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How did this turn out for you Danny? I live on Clayton Road at 1000 foot e levation, rent a home with 2 wells. One, the original is 150 ft deep. The second added in the last drought is 350 feet deep. We have one 5000 gallon tank which over the past 3 years I have lived here has maintained 4500 gal lon fill (presume there is a float shut-off so the well does not overfill t he tank). Noticed 3 months ago that the water level had dropped to 1500 g allons and instituted drastic water conservation lifestyle changes. This mo rning awoke to dry taps in the house. (with no water down 350 feet its a w onder any trees survive... already lost and taken out 3 redwoods with their shallow root system did not make it). There apparently are only 2 licensed companies in Santa Clara Valley to deliver drinking quality water. Left m essages with both this morning and no call back yet (now 1PM). I have an F -350 and have hauled an 8000 lb trailer up and down clayton road (with trai ler brakes) and know it can haul 18000 pounds up this grade. Hence I like the idea of renting a 10,000 lb capacity dual axle trailer with brakes, buy ing a water tank (assuming it costs close to the est. $400, getting a meter from SJWC and a water pump to transfer from trailer to home storage tank. Five trips every 1-3 months in a trailer rented for the day sounds pretty cost effective, and self sufficient. Do you think others would need it up here? How to reach besides door to door? Not looking to make bank, just defray the cost of trailer rental and tank purchase, and do some good for t he neighbors.
As mentioned, have not heard back from the water delivery services, but rea d on another board that it might cost $1000 for 5000 gallons of drinking wa ter delivered. (did you find that to be the rate?). If so, it makes the trailer pulled by my own truck sound viable, and might offer a great deal t o a few neighbors.
So I have a few questions you might have some insights into...
What price per 1000 gallons of drinking water did you find for delivery ser vice?
Thoughts on attaching a tank to a rental trailer (8000 lb of water has huge momentum in any sudden maneuver, deer in the road kind of thing would make me a wary driver even with secure attachment... and would never transport less than topped off tank otherwise the sloshing on acceleration or braking would be problematic, the tank would not have baffles).
In the month(s) between fill-up what is the best way(s) to fight algae grow th in the tank without making water thereafter unpotable in that tank?
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Mark,
How will you clean the trailer so that the water remains potable in transport? It would be naive to assume that the trailer will be clean. Look into Ozone generators to keep bacteria down in your storage tank. There will be some leaching of chemicals from the tank's walls so you may want to test for that. Your local Ag Ext. agent may have advice on water tanks.
Dave M.
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On 09/11/2015 7:42 AM, David L. Martel wrote:

The trailer is simply to set a potable water tank upon for transport...
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dpb,
He's got a 5K tank and wants to trailer 1K at a time. He's intends to buy the 1K tank. He'll need to clean it before each use of the tank. If he used it twice in a day I think it would be ok to not clean between loads. He needs to buy the necessary cleaning gear and be sure that the tanks are easy to clean .
Dave M.
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On 09/11/2015 6:06 PM, David L. Martel wrote:

The point was the dirty "trailer"...the trailer is immaterial; only the tank.
What's to contaminate it as long as it's closed and used only for potable water...it'll be just fine.
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On Saturday, September 12, 2015 at 12:48:51 AM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

One other thing that might be worth considering is that El Nino is brewing in the Pacific at this very moment and it's a big one. That will almost certainly put an end to the CA drought in the next few months, so in the range of solutions, he might want to factor that in. Or maybe secure the tanks so they don't slide away with the mud....
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On 09/12/2015 7:30 AM, trader_4 wrote: ...

Can only hope but while it's possible to replenish some of the surface water, it'll take years rather than months for groundwater to recover and likely some areas have been so depleted they never will; at least in practical time spans of just a few years.
The areas in the Central Valley that have subsided (some places by feet, not just inches) are now more compacted such that renewal will be limited even if rains/snowmelts do return such that regeneration will be slower if not permanently lost...it's not a pretty thought.
It'd been one thing to have had the drought in the area 1000 yr ago when it wasn't populated; it's something else again now that it has been so thoroughly pumped out of ground reservoirs to boot...
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If only the know-it-alls would have added to the water storage, which has not been increased over a period of time the population has doubled or tripled. No matter how many times they have been told . . .
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On 09/12/2015 8:25 AM, taxed and spent wrote: ...

Only would be successful in delaying the inevitable; their current water usage patterns aren't sustainable in that they're outstripping groundwater reservoir longterm regeneration rates...without significant changes in usage efficiencies and patterns it's only a matter of time...
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need to do it all.
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On 9/12/2015 6:17 AM, dpb wrote:

I can't understand the california mindset -- still watering lawns, etc. I recall talking with a friend (from CA) decades ago in school wrt the water issue, there (water had never been a problem in any of the places I'd lived: "God waters the grass -- and, too often, at that!").
I recall her mentioning "yellow is mellow but brown goes down" as the "manual conservation mechanism". Did this attitude change sometime in the recent past? Or, are folks willing to reduce *flushes* but still intent on lush greenscapes?

Yup. People tend to think all natural resources are infinite. Then, when there's a shortage, it's "How did this happen??"
Some years ago, I read an article (that I have frequently sought in the years since) that addressed "mineral" resources. The author went through a list of estimated planet-wide quantities of each. Then, tried to estimate the resources *remaining*.
The only item that stuck in my mind was copper. He claimed that of all the copper there ever is and ever *will* be (until a new planet is formed), 1/4 of it is in current use (in our homes, cell phones, computers, power lines, etc.); another 1/4 of it is buried in land fills (because we never thought it important enough to "rescue", until recently); another 1/4 remains relatively easily harvestable in the mantle; and the final 1/4 is too widely distributed to make harvesting (mining) practical.
When you consider how the "in use" and "in land fills" resources represent such a small, recent portion of human activity, you have to wonder how long the remaining 1/4 will last!
Imagine what this must be like for some of the scarcer resources.

It's always easier to consume than it is to create!
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