How to test electric water heater?

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George,
I believe the water heater also has some improve such as the insulator so it may reduce energy cost if you live in the cold area.
Hai

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Certainly true for older water heaters, but a 15 year old water heater was made in 1989. I think most decent electric water heaters in 1989 had good insulation. In any case, the amount and quality of the insulation in a 15 year old water heater is mostly a quality/cost factor not related to development. Also, retrofit insulation kits for about $15 are available that consist of a fiberglass blanket. I did this in the early 80s on my own and due to conservation efforts by the electric utility which provided the kits for free, I was actually refunded more than I spent on my homemade retrofit. However, not many old things can be retrofit, and certainly not cheaply retrofit, to bring their effieciency up the most current standard.
Hai Pham wrote:

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On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 22:09:26 -0500, Cheryl

A device that has an encased coil of resistive wire that gets hot when electricity is applied is pretty basic. If it takes 1500 watts to heat your water, that means you are using 1500 watts of electricity. You CAN NOT make heating coils more efficient. If you cut down to (example), 1000 watts, all you are doing is making the heater run longer, and create hot water slower. In other words, there is NO SUCH THING as "more efficient" when it comes to devices that heat using electric. Of course the advertisers do a great job of marketing to make you BELIEVE that the new devices are saving power. It's advertising, and that's all it is. The only way to make a water heater more efficient, is to make the insulation better surrounding the tank. If you think your insulation is poor, why replace the tank when a $10 water heater blanket can be purchased and installed in minutes using a scissors and duct tape.
It's different with motorized appliances, and cooling appliances. There are ways to make them more efficient (not that they really do it). For example, My 1990's refrigerator died last year. I acquired an old 1940's refrigerator for free. It still runs, is quieter, and my electric bill dropped about 10%. I was going to buy a newer fridge, but why..... I got a new door gasket for a few bucks and other than the fact that I have to manually defrost the freezer, I have no complaints.
The bottom line. Most of the "more efficient" advertising, is nothing more than marketing to make sales.
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I hope you know unless you have subsidised Hydro Gas is 50 % cheaper. thats a BIG savings. Piss on the waste
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On Mon, 7 Jun 2004 21:17:18 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

Yes, but there is no natural gas line here. I guess I could put in a tank and change appliances, but it would probably take a long time to pay off.
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