How to stop blacktop deterioraton at a cut edge

How to stop blacktop deterioraton at a cut edge?
If a strip 2" thick, 7 feet long, 4" wide at the top, and 1" wide at the bottom, is cut off the edge of a blacktopped road or parking lot, that was paved 3 year ago for the top layer and longer for the other, are there steps that should be taken to keep the remaining blacktop from crumbling, chipping, washing away?
What terms would you use for the kind of deterioration that will occur?
How likely is it, from very unlikely to certain within a year.
Back to the first question, what should be done to prevent any sort of deterioration? Will it work or will the edge still crumble much faster than it would have?
If the contractor is already here to do patching, can you guess how much time the cut wiil take? How much time will the prevention steps take?
Should 3 or 6" more be cut off and a new strip put down? This would double the price, wouldn't it. The Board is in a cheap mode but I might pay for all or part of it if need be. (I only got conclusive evidence this is needed on Saturday night.)
Thanks.
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On Thursday, August 4, 2016 at 1:28:06 AM UTC-4, Micky wrote:

What was happening at the edge of what was there now? It's the same stuff, on the same base, as what will be there after it's cut. If that edge held up OK, then I'd say the new edge will be OK too. If it's laid on a crappy base, then all bets are off. You could put a 6x6 or belgian block up against it, but doubt it's worth it. IDK see the point to cutting 3" or 6" off, how that changes anything. Cutting it with a saw should only take a matter of minutes.
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On Thursday, August 4, 2016 at 8:34:29 AM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

It's not clear to me (or us) what the current edge is like. If it is currently tamped at an angle, like this...
http://hiltonasphaltpaving.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/tamped-on-a-45-degree-angle.jpg
...the edge will not be the same once cut.
I'm considering cutting a tamped edge off of the side of my driveway similar to the "7 feet long, 4" wide at the top and 1" wide at the bottom" that Micky is asking about. If I do that, I will be replacing the material that was removed with cold patch. The new outer edge will be supported by stamped-concrete patio blocks, so I'm not concerned about a raw edge like Micky is.
It's merely a question of whether or not I decide to replace the dirt between the driveway and the patio blocks with a nice rectangular patch or just take the easy way out and fill in the "wedge" as it exists now. No cutting, just remove the dirt and fill.

Tru dat. In my case, the time it takes to rent/borrow a saw will far, far exceed the time it will take to make the cut.
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On Thu, 4 Aug 2016 08:10:28 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Sorry it took so long to answer.
I gave some background, but as usual with many posters, I didn't give enough.

That was hot when it was put down, and it was rolled by a little heavy powered roller, and somehow it is smooth. But I think if someone cuts into it, it will be more ... I don't know how to describe it -- bumpy, sponge-like looking (though not porous a sponge) with pieces that have been almost dislodged by the saw, which will fall out in a little while, leaving holes for water and ice.

The increased thickness of the pavement is obstructing the water drain that is there, and in heavy rains it backs up. (Once it got in someone's car and apparently ruined it, (somehow? I can't quite imagine why vacuuming out the water and shampooing if necessary wouldn't fix it.))
None of this happened until the second time this section was repaved with blacktop. Now the drain, which is 7 feet wide, is only about 2/3rd of it's previous height, 4" instead of 6", and in heavy rain you can see the water backing up at the opening, sloshing up 6 more inches like a wave hitting a wall.

Not as uniform as that, partly because it's only an inch for each layer, and maybe partly because they don't want to hit the cement, which is edged with angle iron, "lid" to the catch basin. It's a typical side-of-street drain, 7 feet long of course (since that's the width of the opening and the catch basin, 3 or 4 feet wide (away from the road), and 4" high (used to be 6")

My work would be done by a paving company who are coming to patch chuckholes, including at another part of the road, cutting out a whole 8 foot section that has 60% of all the chuckholes (It's right at the entrance, for some reason.)
So they should be able to use hot patch, or whatever the opposite of cold patch is. Would that work to keep the edge from crumbling? How thick would they have to apply it? I assume they would know how to do it, but it would help me figure out, with them, how much has to be cut out.

If I wanted to put anything beside the edge, like blocks, I'd have to have cut out that much more of the blacktop, and have to have a good way for to worry about the blocks coming loose. If it can be made to stay in place without blocks, like your picture above, that would be much better.

I thought about doing it myself**, but I'm afraid I'll cut into the original, lowest layer, which is no higher than the entrance to the drain, or that the saw will get away from me and I'll cut down a tree, and I still would need to do something to keep the edge from crumbling.
**Or hiring someone in coveralls and a hardhat.
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On Thu, 4 Aug 2016 05:34:24 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

It's good, but that edge was tamped down, each of the two times the road was repaved. Not sure how to describe it in detail, but it's not like a saw cut will be.

That would mean cutting out 6 more inches and making sure the blocks didn't move.

The increased thickness of the pavement is obstructing the water drain that is there, and in heavy rains it backs up. Once it got in through the door of a car and it came close to reaching the door sill of my car.
None of this happened until after the second time the road was repaved.

I figured that professionals woudl still charge 100 to 150, plus 50 to 100 to do whatever it is they might do to finish the edge so it doesn't crumble. Does that sound about right???
Or they might do it cheaper or for free becuase they're being paid several thousand dollars for what they originally bid on.
Actually the biggest problem is getting the HOA president to believe me. They had the drain pipe vacuumed 2 years ago when this first happened, and indeed, a lot of stuff came out. Couldn't tell exactly what because the 12" vacuum hose was translucent, but there was a lot including any blacktop that comes off the surface of the entire road and parking (I'm at the lowest part of the n'hood, 105 houses.). And they wouldn't go up the hose but I think they were retrieved by vacuum, stuck to the end of the hose, two thin scooters that little kis pedal. One of the kids still visits but she's 25 now. As much as it was, I didn' think it was enough to cause flooding, and sure enough it flooded again.
So then, the people at the property management company, who it seems don't know nothin', claimed it needed vacuuming twice a year. This is a drain that went 30 years without backing up, and yet it supposed to get clogged in 6 or 12 months. I think they are getting a kickback from the vacuum company.
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Any border will help. Cobble stones are often used. I have some piled up rock that was removed before paving then moved back. The edge is hidden under the rock.
--
Dan Espen

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wrote:

Besides what else I've said, this drain gets a tremendous amount of water, because it drains about 4 acres. There are a few other drains along the way, but some are on the uphill side of the road. (I've only checked the problem drain and 3 others. I'll have to go check all the others in the next rain.)
The roofs lead to gutters that lead to downspouts that for 95%** of the houses lead to pipes under the ground that come out through the curb, into the road again. **My house is too far from the road to drain like that.
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