How to space blocks under trailer house


I'm levelling a used trailer house that I bought for storage. I know how to put the blocks under it, which means using solid 4x8x16 blocks against the soil, and stacking concrete blocks under the steel frame. The 4 corners are double stacked, the center ones are single. What I am not sure about is the spacing. What is the recommended spacing between block piles going the length of the trailer? This is a smaller trailer, about 45ft long and 12 wide. I only bought it for storage on my farm. Yes, I do plan to install screw in anchors. Dont worry about building codes, they dont check on storage buildings around here. I just want to be sure there are enough block piles to support it properly.
Thanks
jw
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

I think you'll want the solid concrete for ground contact, and have the metal in contact with the wood.
Jon
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On Jun 25, 6:39 am, "Jon Danniken"

If it was my trailer, I would use 4 piles on each side, spaced approx. 15 feet apart Of course, it depends on what you're planning on storing in there. Unless it's extremely heavy items, I think the four piles per side would suffice.
Robin
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On Fri, 25 Jun 2010 05:04:18 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

I don't know the answer for spacing. Me, I would look under the trailer and guesstimate where the previous blocks were positioned (closely look at the frame for marking/scratches?). I would also consider the distance between cross-members in the frame.
Cedar shims (wide), between the blocks and frame will help you get the frame level.
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Oren wrote:

Storage of what? Weight load makes a difference. Most trailer floors are flimsy even when new. Your feet will tell you when you start loading it up. May want to lay down a layer of plywood while it is empty.
For storage, I woulda been more inclined to go with retired semi trailer or shipping container. Unless maybe you are gonna put utilities to the thing, and make it into the guest house for family come the holidays.
--
aem sends....


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only bought it for

If constructed for highway use, the trailer is not designed to distribute the weight evenly along the chassis: it is designed so that the wheel axles support the weight. Trailers are blocked not to support the weight but to prevent their tipping, so that weight falls elsewhere than onto the axles.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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