How to rewire backyard security camera properly?


Hello,
I had a DVR security system installed in my house 2 years ago.One cam is up a tree in the back yard and it stopped working.I climbed up the tree to check the connection, the power connection is okay but the video connection is rusted and ruined and I had to cut it out. Now I have two wires that need connectors and then need to be spliced together. The cable that runs from the house is like a thick cable TV cable. The other one, the one from the camera, is much thinner, and the connector was like a stereo plug. What’s the best way to splice these wires considering they have to survive the rain and cold?
I know I could buy the 2 replacement connectors, splice the wires and wrap them in tape and the plug them into an adapter, but this would be more vulnerable than the connection that just rusted.
Is there a better way? Thanks
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Unused Classified wrote:

Hmm. After you get the connection made - and verify that it works - I'd cover it with some shrink-wrap material. Then I'd slather the whole thing with an inch-thick coathing silicone-based caulk.
Make sure it's routed away from branches and other stuff that could mechanically abrade the wire or connection.
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HeyBub wrote:

Re-thinking the issue, perhaps you might put connectors on each bit of wire, enclosing the connection in a weather-proof box.
That way you can more easily modify, move, or replace whatever part fails in the future.
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If you put it in a box...you may be looking for moisture build-up (condensation). Check with the phone or cable guys...they have encapcillating materials that work!
bob_v
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Stop selling drugs out of your house and you won't need a camera in the tree
Hello,
I had a DVR security system installed in my house 2 years ago.One cam is up a tree in the back yard and it stopped working.I climbed up the tree to check the connection, the power connection is okay but the video connection is rusted and ruined and I had to cut it out. Now I have two wires that need connectors and then need to be spliced together. The cable that runs from the house is like a thick cable TV cable. The other one, the one from the camera, is much thinner, and the connector was like a stereo plug. What’s the best way to splice these wires considering they have to survive the rain and cold?
I know I could buy the 2 replacement connectors, splice the wires and wrap them in tape and the plug them into an adapter, but this would be more vulnerable than the connection that just rusted.
Is there a better way? Thanks
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I couldnt tell you how to splice the wires without being there. Outdoor splices I always wrap with 3m black vinyl tape and then put shrink tubing over that. The shrink tubing should be cut long enough so it extends an inch or so beyond the tape on each end of the splice. As you may have guessed this can take some planning. You may have to put the shrink tube on the wire before you splice it but dont shrink it down until the splice is taped. This should make a very good weather proof splice but it still can be attacked by UV radiation that will cause the shrink tube and tape to deteriorate. Splices like this at work I usually just wrap with more tape because I know I will be inspecting them every year and I can always just replace the tape. At home rubber stretch tape should last 5 to 10 years, probably longer than the camera. All shrink tubing is not created equal. I bought some at the NAPA store that was very good. The center of it melted to form a seal around the wire and the inside to outside thickness of the tubing was quite thick after shrinking.
Jimmie
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On Mon, 26 Oct 2009 18:09:20 -0700, Unused Classified wrote:

If it's a multi-way cable, I'll solder and heatshrink individual wires, then use a big bit of heatshrink over the outer to stop moisture getting between the outer sheathing and the individual wires and potentially causing a problem later.
If the video connection's rusted it sounds like you might want to add some form of shroud to the back of the camera at the same time (seal it with caulking or whatever) just to keep moisture off and avoid the same thing happening in a few years (but as someone says, don't box it all in to avoid condensation issues)
cheers
Jules
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On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 07:21:32 -0500, Jules

different sizes for splicing electrical power cables down to phone wires. You still have to install whatever the appropriate connectors are needed for your cables (unless one of the included connection blocks works for you) but then you lay your finished connection in the thick black goop and close the clamshell around it. The nice thing is you can reopen it later if needed.
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On Oct 27, 8:49 am, snipped-for-privacy@neo.rr.com wrote:

There is a product that consists of about 1 1/2" pieces of shrink tubing that also has a compound on the inside of the tubing. When it's heated with a gun, the compound inside melts surrounding the connection as the tubing shrinks, forming a water tight seal. Either HD or an electrical supply should have it.
Alternatively, HD sells kits for sprinkler lines. It's wire nuts together with tubes filled with grease that you then place over them.
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On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 12:08:01 -0700, Smitty Two wrote:

Interesting. I've only ever bought it from electronics parts suppliers, and just quoted the length I need (usually several feet at a time), so I didn't realise there were a couple of standards (other than some theoretical maximum reel size :-)

now that I didn't know, and might be useful - I've coped with the 'different diameters' problem before by using a couple of bits of overlapped heatshrink (of appropriate diameter) on the smaller part to bring it up to about the same diameter as the larger part, then heatshrinking the whole lot - but it's hardly elegant.
cheers
Jules
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Jules wrote:

has one designed to be mounted up under a soffit, not actually out in the weather. I'm thinking one of those ones in a UV-resistant plastic ball or something?
-- aem sends...
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