How to replace torsion springs?

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How?
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snipped-for-privacy@inmail24.com wrote:

If you are thinking garage door, the answer is the yellow pages. This job is dangerous for someone who does not know what they are doing.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Why is it that people are so damn afraid of springs. Are you afraid to change the shocks on your car? Damn
you need: 2 bars maybe 30 inches long, not too long not too short. Probably 3/8 or 1/2 inch diameter
wrench to fit the bolts in the outboard spring mount[square head on my doors]
There are 4 holes in the outboard ends of the springs. The bars need to just fit in them.
standing on a very sturdy ladder, you will need to first take the weight of the spring with your shoulder. Stick the bar in the hole that is closest to horizontal.If you let the bar loose it will go flying, break your collar bone or somehting similarly ugly. So you are standing on the ladder, door down, facing the door, bar resting firmly on your shoulder. when you lift the bar you will see the cable slack.
loosen the bolts clamping the spring retainer to the bar. the bar should be weighing on your shoulder, not any space in between you and it.
The force will now be on your shoulder and not on the door. Take the second bar and place it in one of the holes above the one you are using and push it up, away, towards the door/wall.
This will allow you to remove the bar resting on your shoulder.
carefully lower the second bar till it rests on your shoulder
repeat.
When there is no force left on the bar, you can do the other side.
tightening is the reverse process
Note that there is always a bar in the hole, so that the spring can only spin less than half a turn and is not very dangerous unless you put your head in there or use some old rotten piece of tubing instead of a proper solid steel bar.
Completely replacing a spring is a little more complicated than just adjusting, but not rocket science. Note exactly how the cable is wound on the pulley.
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Try this..... http://truetex.com/garage.htm I used the above as a guide. Take a few digital photos so you can tell how everything should look when finished. It took me a full day, but I saved $800. Best of luck.
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Access might be an issue, but wouldn't this be much easier with the door *open* ?
Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Suggest that you go out and look at your garage door when it is open and closed. The best access will immediately be obvious.
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Best access when open, yes. But most stored energy- the spring is under a LOT less tension when the door is open.
Hopefully, I will not have to mess with mine.
-D
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On 18 Jan 2006 05:42:56 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Which one of those "open"s means "closed"? I guess the first one.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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D'oh!

-D
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

In many installations there is NO access when closed. It would be nice to unwind it when the door is open, but that just isn't possible in many cases. Still, there is no problem if you work slowly and carefully.
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George E. Cawthon wrote:

How on earth can there be no access when closed? Would not the door have to be below the spring? I have never seen any such install, and can't immediately picture it
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yourname wrote:

oops, should be "no access when the door is open." I can't picture it either. Good catch.
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yourname wrote:

## See below

Follow the above instructions exactly. If you don't, you may die. No joke.
These springs have as much as 47,000 ft lbs of energy stored within them. This is enough energy to raise a Volkswagen higher than a two-story house (or fling you a city block), or bake 15,000 pizzas.
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HeyBub wrote:

Yeah, right. They can't even lift my door up 7 feet. I have to lift up at least 50 pounds to get the door up. I think the door weighs a lot less than a Volkswagen.
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yourname wrote:

Because people who are not sure how to do it tend to get injured and sometimes seriously.
I have changed shocks in my car, but then I have some knowledge of what I was doing. I did not have to ask in a news group how to do it.
There are things that not everyone should attempt.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Evidently you're not familiar with changing shocks on a car, or you would not imagine that the two situations are even remotely similar.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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yourname wrote:

well, this is good for someone like you and me
BUT...
i seen a dude climb a ladder with the tools you describe
one tool slips...the other tool is fixed on the overhead bar. the bar is loaded from the spring...it spins around and goes into his wrist...it rips out his wrist basically
don't encourage this sort of thing
you should say...
"I am experienced with this sort of thing"
it is not for average homeowner
sure, if they had the right knowledge it could be painless and easy but it's a once in a lifetime matter for most and they should hire a professional
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abRokeNegRo wrote:

sorry, I agree and disagree.
I believe in giving people appropriate information. I think my description is accurate. Including the door being down. Neither of the doors I deal with can be adjusted with the door up, the door is in the way. PLUS, the door can't fall when it is already down. Anyway, I warned the guy he could break his collarbone, the most likely injury IMO, other than getting scared and falling off the ladder.
Is this guy capable?
I dunno, that is for him to figure out.
I learned by asking and figuring it out myself.
Maybe he learns the same way
If he does, all the 'call a door guy' comments are pretty useless.
You will. On occasion see me tell people to call someone, but this is the one topic that irks me.
A spring compessor in changing a shock is MUCH more dangerous than a stupid garage door. Why? Because it is removed compressed, energy stored. A garage door spring is removed slack, when it is wound, it is restrained by the shaft. If it breaks, it will scare the crap out of you, but it cannot travel anywhere, unlike the 120 lb/in spring on the back of my car
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yourname wrote:

no apologies needed
in general, it is the square holes where you put your bars that become very dangerous..
even if it looks simple it is not
i know this because, i know the torque behind it... i also know if one does not have strong hands, quick reflexes etc...and are just generally soft handed...they don't wanna fornicate with it...
you end up with 2 bars in your hands with enough pressure to snap dey wrist or break a finger etc...
so get real this is not everyday changing ac filters in the house
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my holes are all round.......I'll just leave that one hanging

twas simple fer me

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