how to repair pop-corn acoustic ceiling?

My house is built in 1977 in Silicon Valley Northern California. The white ceiling is what they so call pop-corn acoustic ceiling. I need to replace a area of 16" x 22" ceiling dry sheet rocks.
Can you tell me how to re-paint this pop-corn ceiling to match the rest ceiling?
What is this material and how to apply it?
Thank you.
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If you want the repair to be anywhere close to invisible then call a drywall repair company.
cm

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It has to be sprayed on, not a simple DIY job. There are people that do it for a living but I imagine they'd want a nice buck to come out and set up.
I hate the stuff and scraped my ceiling clean and painted them. IMO, much better looking.
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How much work need to scrap the ceiling of a 15' x 15' size room?

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29 square feet more than that needed to scrape a 14' x 14' ceiling.
--
Jim McLaughlin

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Move out furniture. Cover floors with visqueen. Spray water on ceiling. Work with about three foot sections at a time. Try to get just wet enough to get off, let the water soak in so it comes off easy. You will know when it has soaked enough by how easy it scrapes off.
No easy clean way to do it. It goes fast and comes off easy. Don't make more work by scraping hard. Light scraping yields no marks so you can just sand and retexture.
STeve
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On Sun, 13 Aug 2006 22:41:46 -0700, "Steve B"

Yes it comes off easy. _IF_ it's never been painted.
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You might want to send off a sample for asbestos testing. It was used in sprayed ceilings up to a point. If you worry about such things that is.
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Steve Barker



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Other than an experienced person doing it with a hopper, no. You're gonna see it.
They make spray cans of adjustable popcorn. It anly does a VERY small area. I've never used it but I just know you're gonna see it.
They make 2 gal buckets of popcorn you roll on but you're gonna see it. Even if you got it to match it's gonna be visable where the old meets the new unless you scraped and feathered it in and got very lucky.
You can buy a bag of popcorn and mix it with ceiling paint. Good luck getting the right amount of popcorn that is your particular ceiling. Did I mention, you're gonna see it?

Gee, 22". Sure you don't mean 22.5...the distance between two trusses edge to edge? 16"???...about the depth of a trim person. Auguuuuust, don't tell me you were up in the attic and stepped off the truss cord???? Silly you!
When you do put that patch up, sister some wood pcs on to the sides of the truss chords/joist and screw in on two ends so it won't move later. On the other two sides put a board perpendicular connecting two truss chords/joists. Screw both other two patch edges and the old ceiling edge to it. If you don't do this, a crack will develop at the seams over time. THen of course tape and mud as you had planned.
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Use this opportunity to trash it all. It scrapes off easily, and putting up some texture is easy.
Popcorn ceilings suck. Dust and cobweb magnets. Discolored. Hard to paint. etc etc etc.
It will probably cost the same either way.
STeve
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If you do remove it, get an asbestos test first. Many popcorn ceilings have asbestos in them (ours do) and have to be professionally removed. They are safe so long as they are intact, but if you remove them the asbestos will be released.
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No, it really won't be released. It comes down in globs, just like it is on the ceiling. You wet it first with a spray bottle or sponge so it scrapes easily and you have no dust problems and no professionals needed. The tiny bit of asbestos that may be in there is safely disposed of.
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HamNCheese wrote:

Why test, just remove it, and no, in many places you the homeowner can remove it himself, with no problem. If you wet the stuff to remove it, there won't be anything released.
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This house was built in 1997 in Silicon Valley by Shappell, major builder here. I think they stopped using asbestos since? Or, am I wrong?

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2006 August wrote:

different size particles, most ceilings I have seen and my own are the large type particles. It is rather difficult to use because the stuff comes out at high pressure and you need to overlap on to the old part. You might have to get two cans and go from different directions to make the repair essentially invisible.
I removed a stove pipe, filled in the hole and then sprayed with the stuff. First shot was a bit of a mess but the second resulted in a repair I can see but most people wouldn't notice. You will most likely have to paint the ceiling after you complete the repair. I would not try painting the ceiling with a roller although you will get many people who have said they did. The best way and the way that uses the least paint is to spray it, but that means covering everything; not hard if you simply tape vinyl ceiling to floor and cover the floor before you begin. Did all of my rooms that way.
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2006 August wrote:

Two words: KITTY LITTER.
I tried the spray on stuff and it was a horrendous mess that didn't match at all so I quickly wiped it off.
I got a hot tip to apply a skim coat and smash kitty litter into the skim coat. After it dries, carefully prime and paint to match.
Practice this on cardboard first to see if you can match your texture. I found that applying primer or paint heavily on a second coat made some drops that helped blend things by making the kitty litter less angular/sharp/rocky looking.
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On Mon, 14 Aug 2006 02:22:02 GMT, "2006 August"

That's a huge area to patch. Phone a local drywall company, get them to spray it on ... then paint the entire ceiling.
Ken
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