how to remove the old blade from a used circular saw?

Page 2 of 2  
I put the saw blade in my bench vise and then loosen the bolt and bevel. I find an adjustable wrench is easier than the spanner that comes with the saw. (Longer handle=more torque.) .

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
that's a good idea, I might use a couple pieces of wood to pad it. Tony D

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to Sam Kaan, Vegsteve wrote:

Re: try and unbolt that bolt and the whole blade just keeps spining.
I just had this problem with my Skil Saw. The problem ended up being that I had a blade that was too thick in it. This caused the washer to spin because it could not engage the square nut that just protrudes past the blade. The solution was to use a chisel to pry the washer a bit and keep it from spinning. Bolt came off easily after. btw: I find that using a large vicegrip works well to hold the blade from turning.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 12 Jan 2016 03:44:01 +0000, Vegsteve

Are you saying you stop the blade but the arbor keeps spinning?
There is usually a pair of flat spots on the arbor on the back of the blade that a skinny wrench engages. Then you spin off the nut.
You do need that skinny wrench tho.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/11/2016 10:30 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

7¼" CIRCULAR saw. He's talking about a 'D' washer (I believe is the correct nomenclature) and an arbor BOLT.
Believe that you're thinking of a table saw. Maybe I lead a sheltered life but I've never seen a second wrench for a circular saw. Owned B&D, Monkey Wards, Craftsman and Crapsman, Skil and Milwaukee. Some circular saws have a locking pin that locks the arbor. I usually just let the teeth grab onto a piece of scrap 2 by and there's no problem.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 11 Jan 2016 22:39:45 -0600, Unquestionably Confused

Yup you are right.
Clare has the right idea. Use an impact wrench. If you don't have one, take it to an auto mechanic or someone who does.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 12 Jan 2016 00:50:55 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Just remeber if it is a left hand saw (opposite normal - blade on the left instead of the right) the bolt will be a "lefty"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 12 Jan 2016 00:50:55 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

An impact wrench to remove a circ saw arbor bolt? Please. I expect the OP jacks his car up before he breaks the lugs too. Just lock the blade. I've done it hundreds of times, using different methods. A locking arbor, screwdriver though a hole in the blade, screwdriver between teeth, visegrips, even between scraps of wood in a vise. Etc, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 12 Jan 2016 05:57:35 -0600, Vic Smith

If the bolt is bound up in the shaft, the blade can be stopped and the shaft may still turn after the bolt backs out a little.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 12 Jan 2016 11:34:23 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Yeah, that can happen. But the OP said the blade was spinning. He just didn't know how to stop it from turning.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/12/2016 1:21 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

Vise grips do a nice job. Or C-clamp. Toe of your boot (make sure saw is unplugged).
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 12 Jan 2016 12:21:22 -0600, Vic Smith

I read it to mean the blade was spinning on the (arbor) shaft.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/12/2016 8:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Seeing things? I sure didn't read that.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 12 Jan 2016 05:57:35 -0600, Vic Smith

Read the original post.The blade was turning on the arbor because the blade was too thick and the "d" washer didn't catch. No way to lock the arbor, so impact is the tool of choice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 12 Jan 2016 20:25:44 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Just use a cutting torch to cut off the bolt. Then toss the saw and the blade in the garbage and go buy a new one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 12 Jan 2016 03:44:01 +0000, Vegsteve

An impact will do it pretty well every time if you get a "spinner"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.