How to remove self-leveling underlayment??

A long story short..
I'm putting down laminate flooring across a living and dining room. The transition from the living room to the dining room there is a difference in height from about 1/8" in some areas to 1/4" in others.
I decided after talking to several people that using Portland-based cement self-leveling underlayment may be the best approach to this. However after starting I realized my skills were not the greatest at this and now I am regretting this as the end results aren't the greatest.
After thinking some more, I think the best corse of action for someone of my skill level would be to attempt to remove the underlayment, run the laminate to the transition and then place a transition piece down, thus seperating the living from the dining room. While not the most aesthetically appealing, it'd be able to do the purpose.
So now I'm asking, if there is even a way to remove the cement based self-leveling underlayment without damaging the plywood that is my base.
Thank you in advance.
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What skill was that, not mixing enough water so it did not self level. You should not have had to trowel it.
In any case, it won't be easy to get it up, its going to want to rip off the face of the plywood if you try to chip it.. Your best bet is make what you did work. What is the problem? Maybe a little hand grinding with a concrete brick will smooth it enough for your needs, a brick can be used like sandpaper on cement surfaces.
If I had to remove all or most of it, I might try a drum sander with a very corse grit (60 or corser). If it were thick, you can rent a concrete grinder but that sounds to be overkill for what you describe. A belt sander with similarly corse and strong belt can be used to touch up an otherwise uneven trowling job. An orbital pad sander (large used for refinishing floors) might pass depending on the condition you have and need.
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I followed the directions to a T... 2 parts cement, 1 part water. A colleague who suggested this to begin with stated not to make a lot at one time as it will harden up rather quickly. I followed his directions by doing just that, taking a roughly 20 oz. can and put in a bucket, two of those and one of water.
I spoke with him this morning and he noted that I may be able to use a brick to sand it down smooth and perhaps use another mix that is premade to even out other areas.
We shall see.
Thank you all for your suggestions so far.
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I had the same problem. Smart ass comments aside, that stuff's a pain to put down. I mixed it as the bag stated, spread it out as the bag stated, etc... what I got was a total mess. The stuff sets up so darn fast that it doesn't allow itself time to "self level". Now, I live in a very dry part of the country so maybe that was my problem. In any case, I was able to apply it again in a different room with a little better results but I added more water than they recommended. Anyway, there's really no easy way to remove it. Can you float another coat over it to give you what you want? If not, I ended up chipping it out using an air scraper (http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber7073). It worked pretty well but created a ton of dust. I was taking it off concrete so you may have better luck given it's over ply. If it's still pretty green, you can even go at it with a hand scraper. It took awhile but ultimately I got it all off. Good luck with it!
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I saw a TV contractor who recommended painting the subfloor with acrylic latex admixture before pouring self levelling underlayment. His comments were that it reduces the floors absorption of the water out of the underlayment which would cause problems when trying to get it to self level particularly at thin edges.

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