How to remove paint from PVC pipe?

I have a section of PVC pipe I need to put a ball valve in. The pipe was previously painted (I believe water based paint) and I need to clean that paint off so I can apply PVC primer and glue. What is the best way to clean the paint off? I tried sandpaper and that did not go very far,
Thanks,
MC
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MiamiCuse wrote:

Coarser sandpaper... OR if the pipe was just painted over without prep, you might have luck with hot water (as hot as you can stand) and a soft scraper (think bondo spreader)
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MiamiCuse wrote:

I would just use a little coarser open coat sandpaper initially to break through the paint and then follow up with finer paper.
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alcohol will soften latex, even booze. Cover it with a rag and soak it for an hr or two
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wrote:

Mechanical suggestions are better but as far as chemicals, xylene is what's in Goof-off. Then, there's regular old paint stripper.
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On Sat, 18 Apr 2009 16:10:18 -0400, "MiamiCuse"

Acetone?
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Oren wrote:

Not good with PVC from recollection. T'was many years ago,1970s, when re plumbing a 1920s house with PVC waste pipes.
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Oren wrote:

Acetone will definately disolve the PVC.
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Have you tried the primer yet. I would think that the primer by itself might do the trick. It's job is to clean the pipe.

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Bob F wrote:

Correct. Solvents that remove paint will attack PVC.
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Not alcohol, alcohol will make it just peel off .
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On Sat, 18 Apr 2009 16:10:18 -0400, "MiamiCuse"

There are 80, 100, 150 and 220 grit sandpapers. I'd try the 100 grit first.
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MiamiCuse wrote:

Paint remover will soften paint almost instantaneously. If removed as soon as the paint wrinkles up, it probably won't soften the PVC. Fine steel wool for final clean-up.
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MiamiCuse wrote:

Brake fluid eats paint, leaves most plastics alone, even styrofoam. I used some to remove the paint from my Ford wheel covers made of an ABS-lexan blend.
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Makes sense since many brake fluid parts are plastic. There are so many plastics though. Can be impervious to one plastic and liquify another.
If OP does try this, wear safety glasses. This is one time you really need them! I'm told it's one of the most damaging fluids you can get in your eyes. It sucks the water out of what it comes in contact with, aka brake fluid is hydroscopic (absorbs water).

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Correction: 'hygroscopic'. You're welcome. <G>
Joe
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Well, either way, it still sucks. :-)
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