How to remove outdoor faucet?

Have a 20 year old house. There are two faucets sticking out of the sidings of the house (one front, one back). I want to replace them with better ones (freeze resistance).
Is there a standard code on how these were installed? I mean, do these faucets twist off, or do I have to cut the dry wall and cut the pipe?
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peter wrote:

If the current ones are not freeze proof sill cocks, then they may be just screwed on with threads at the outside of the house. But, to install freeze proof ones, you're gonna have to get 12" of so inside the house, because freeze proof ones are that long. That;s how they are freeze proof, because the valve is actually at the far end of the assemby and water drains out. Usually that is not a problem, because you have access to that area in the basement. What did you do with the ones u have now? There should be a shut off inside somewhere nearby for winterization. Frequently that area gives you access to the pipe coming in through the wall.
The fp sill cocks can either be soldered onto copper pipe or threaded on. They have male threads outside and will accept copper inside.
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Why not ask RT?
http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/print/0,17071,480863,00.html
This is not a 'cut & dry' project. If you don't have any plumbing experience you may want to skip it or call a plumber. Since your house is fairly new you should have shutoff valves in the heated portion of the house to prevent freezing.
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For the front faucet, there is a shutoff inside the garage.
For the backyard faucet, I'm not sure if there is a shutoff. Perhaps it shares the same shutoff as the one inside the garage, but it never occured to me until now. The only other place that may have the shutoff for the back faucet I could think of would be in the crawl space.
I'll have to check, although I'm afraid to touch that back faucet because it is difficult to shut off completely, and when turning it off it makes squeaking sound as if something is about to break (it has a plastic knob).
The pipe that leads to the back faucet is inside a wall between kitchen and living room. On the kitchen side the wall is inside a cabinet. I guess I'd have to cut the wall in the cabinet if I want to replace that faucet. Soldering while inside a cabinet corner may be hard.
The one in front is easier because it is inside the garage wall.
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See http://www.easy2diy.com/cm/easy/diy_ht_index.asp?page_id5720531

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If the existing faucets havent been a freeze problem in 20 years why replace them?
basically every fall you with regular faucets you must turn them off at shutoff inside, open outsde valve, and disconnect hose/.
with the freeze proof you must still disconnect hose if any....
so you save little:(
Are your faucets leaking or something?
I have a friend who wanted new outside faucets since the existing ones leaked, at the handle.... the stem is the proper term.......
I grapped pliars, tightened the packing nut a quarter turn and she thought I was a miracle worker:)
They had leaked for 7 years and her hubby is clueless.....
I used one of those faucets recently, no leak.
perhaps you can save a lot of work?
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